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Nendo Reimagines Boring Office Supplies Like Rubber Bands, Paperclips And Rulers Into Inspiring Works Of Design





In one of those rare meetings of form and function, Nendo’s stationery and office supplies looks great and works well. The cubic rubber bands are one example. According to the company, “The geometrical shapes make the bands easy to find in a drawer and easy to pick up.” The Tokyo and Milan-based design firm created the blue, charcoal, and white three-dimensions bands for their brand ‘by | n’. They’re a part of the eleven item collection, which also includes a flip pen, contrast ruler, circle tags, paper clips, outline tray, cross pen-stand, peel pen-case, hard cover memo-pad, edge note, and dot envelope.

The contrast ruler is another success. Simple, but considered, the design has the ruler markings fade from white to black on either edge, making the ruler easy to read against all color backgrounds. Smart, too, are the paper clips that are made out of recyclable paper.

The minimalist collection sells itself, but the clever illustrations explaining the functionality of the various pieces are a whimsical touch, adding a softer element to the crisp, clean-lined, designs.

Nendo’s philosophy is clearly evident with this collection. The website states:

Giving people a small ” ! ” moment.
There are so many small ” ! ” moments hidden in our everyday.

But we don’t recognize them.
and even when we do recognize them, we tend to unconsciously reset our
minds and forget what we’ve seen.

But we believe these small ” ! ” moments are what make our days so
interesting, so rich.

That’s why we want to reconstitute the everyday by collecting and
reshaping them into something that’s easy to understand.

We’d like the people who’ve encountered nendo’s designs to feel these
small ” ! ” moments intuitively.

That’s nendo’s job.

Photos by Akihiro Yoshida. via Spoon & Tamago

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Studio Visit: Michael Anderson

michael anderson topOne of the highlights for me during the last couple months was hearing Michael Anderson shut down a pessimistic discussion about “no new types of painting.” His booming voice broke the ennui in the room with: “The future is really enormous and there must be at least 9 million new kinds of painting to be made.”  Michael is optimistic, and his art is too.  He was cool enough to let us into his studio, the Harlem Collage Shop, to check out what he is up to.  Using street posters and billboards gathered in NYC and other major cities around the world, Anderson makes super-sized collages, commonly 8 x 8 feet and up.  He collects the posters at night, which seems like a dangerous thing to do, but he’s a big guy and didn’t seem to give a shit, just citing his birthplace as the Bronx.

Advertise here !!!

Estelle Hanania

French born and Paris based photographer Estelle Hanania is obviously interested in ritualistic worship and folklore culture. Find more of her work at FAT Galerie.


Clarissa Bonet’s Somber Reconstructions Of The Urban Landscape

Clarissa Bonet

Clarissa Bonet Photography

Clarissa Bonet Photography 1

Everyone has a different perception of the city, to some it might feel luxurious and culturally rich, to others it might appear to be dirty and smelly, and to many natives, including Chicago based artist Clarissa Bonet, the city is this somber, anonymous, and emotionally charged space.

Bonet’s acclaimed on-going series, City Space, captures her personal perception of the urban landscape and its relationship to the ones that inhabit it.

“The Urban space is striking. Its tall and mysterious building, crowds of anonymous people, and endless seas of concrete constantly intrigue me,” the artist says.  

Her images are reconstructions of her perceptions/past experiences in the cityscape. Some may seem overly dramatic- as her play with lights and darks and muted colors, as she mentions in her artist statement on her website, are both visual strategies she is interested in working with.

On her artist statement, she also mentions that she reconstructs “the city as a stage to transform the physical space into a psychological one. The images […] do not represent a commonality of experience but instead prove a personal interpretation of the urban landscape.”

One of the most interesting elements in this body of work is her ability to transfer what would seem to be a mundane act on the streets to a scene that speaks of the human psyche, and emotion in general. Her subjects, most with their head down or covered, seem to purposely appear anonymous, giving the viewer a sense of them not being there, as they blend with the rest of the composition. Could this be cultural commentary/criticism on behalf of the artist? That is not out of the question, as these powerful and somber, yet beautiful images do make the viewer question contemporary living in the cityscape.

Beautiful/Decay & Insight Sample Sale Wrap Up!

Thanks to everyone that came out to the Beautiful/Decay & Insight 51 sample sale on Friday and Saturday. Both days were filled with eager shoppers who were anxious to get  a good deal and hang with us for two sun drenched california days. Here are some highlights …



Everyone loves a good sample sale where one can find those rare one off samples that you can’t get in stores. Apparently Cousin It got wind of it and came through to find the perfect surfin safari outfit.


Barry McGee

A nice short video of Barry McGee installing in São Paulo Brazil. Not often that you see a street artist filmed in such a delicate, dreamy, and romantic style.

Yujean Park’s “Every Day Life”


I found Yujean Park’s images on our Creative Pic Pool. Her work caught my eye for their haunting stillness. Many feature tableauxs of seemingly vacant, or recently vacated domestic spaces that seem subtly concerned with their own transience…Even when there is a figure in the frame, they seem ghostlike….or is it just me?

Alex Schubert’s Blobby Boys

I like to think of Alex Schubert’s Blobby Boys as a mid 90’s live action sitcom that never happened.  They smoke (and deal) weed, romp around the city on motorcycles, slime people, and steal your milk money all before they’ve had band practice.