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Hallucination: Martin Eder’s Menacing, Black Sculptural Installation Challenges Our Perception

Martin Eder - Installation Martin Eder - Installation Martin Eder - Installation Martin Eder - Installation

We’ve featured the paintings of German artist Martin Eder before, such as his portraits of female warriors and erotic kitsch. Another notable work of his is an installation known as “Hallucination,” which was shown in the Dimensions Variable exhibition at Berlin’s Galerie Eigen + Art in May 2013. The installation features a massive sculpture (6m x 10m x 10m) made of twisted black metal that appears to hover above the ground prior to impact. Like an ominous void, the object resonates with stillness and terror, unsettling the psyche with its violent yet silent presence.

The press release for “Hallucination” likens the object to Plato’s Cave, an allegory in Western philosophy that centers around the development of cognition and one’s sense of reality. Eder’s structure resembles a cave, a negative cavity that produces tension between abstraction and reality. Its liminal status (not falling, not making contact) makes it an object of infinite reflection; it becomes a symbol of a distant threat while also operating as a source of knowledge. Our physical relationship to the object—standing in a room or a hallway with it, for example—shapes how it manifests itself in our imaginations.

Visit Eder’s website and Galerie Eigen + Art to learn more. (Via Sweet Station)

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Chrissie Abbott

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Chrissie Abbott’s work reminds me of something you’d see while rummaging through psychedelic album covers at a record store.  I dig it! I love the mixture of black and white photography and colorful elements. She has done work for Little Boots, Nylon, and New York magazine.

 

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BEAUTIFUL/DECAY X ROYAL TALENS Amsterdam Trip PT. 1

I’m happy to present second installment of photographs from our amazing European trip with our friends over at Royal Talens And Canson. If you remember we started our trip in Paris and made our way over to Amsterdam, stopping along the way to check out all the museums, galleries, and sights that each city offered.

We started our first day in Amsterdam with a boat tour of the canals to get acquainted with the many tiny streets and canals that zig zag throughout the city. Along the way we saw many amazing examples of dutch architecture, design, street art and of course Houseboats!

Peter Kogler’s Intricate Installations Transform Spaces Into A Vortex Of Warped, Optical Illusions

Peter Kogler - Installation/Paint

Peter Kogler - Installation/Paint

optical  Installation

Artist Peter Kogler takes ordinary spaces and converts them into optical illusions with little more than paint and projections. His installations completely encompass the gallery room or public space in which they inhabit and cause it to appear warped, stretched, distorted and twisted. These eye-tricking spaces devour the viewer in their endless lines and pattern while they creates a disorienting effect. Each strategically placed line is created by paint, but also sometimes by a projection onto the walls. Because Kogler’s patterns and lines are often on every side of the space, including the ceiling and floor, they create a powerful and overwhelming environment. The wall-to-wall spaces are completely taken over by lined grids, tubes weaving around each other, and swirling scribbles that create funhouse walls.

The settings for Kogler’s elaborate and impressive installations vary from gallery rooms to subway tunnels. One can truly get lost in these complex compositions trailing all over each wall. Each installation is like a beautiful labyrinth that entraps and engulfs the viewer. Kogler’s work uses mostly bold colors like white and black, and sometimes red. This creates a harsh, stark contrast that allows the optical illusion to be more apparent with a highly dramatic feel. The artist’s talent does not only lie in his incredible installations, but also his sculpture and two-dimensional work. His use of geometrics and line is similar in his other work, which makes them look absolutely stunning when they are exhibited within his installations. Kogler’s multifaceted style compliments whichever medium he desires.(via Illusion.scene360)

Jota Castro

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Jota Castro is an artist concerned with security. His pieces show you everything and forget to beg for forgiveness. They seem to like people, but hate owners. The work offers no chance for remorse, but that is the best thing about them.

Dive Into the Underwater World of Adam Wallacavage’s Magnificent Octopus Chandeliers

Adam Wallacavage - epoxy clay, lamp parts, epoxy resin and spray paint

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

What do you get when you combine underwater sea creatures with elegant and sophisticated lighting? You get the weird and whimsical octopus chandeliers of artist Adam Wallacavage. The Philadelphia based artist uses traditional ornamental plastering techniques to create working chandeliers in the shape of octopus and fantastical sea life. Each chandelier is created from a wide range of materials such as epoxy resin, iridescent powders, spray paint, and glitter. His inspiration and ideas come from a very eclectic range of sources such as flashy church decoration, tales of underwater adventure, and, not surprisingly, taxidermy. His absurd style is both gaudy and Victorian while still being absurdly fun.

Wallacavage’s childlike imagination turns a seemingly normal object into wonderfully gaudy and kitschy chandeliers full of shiny colors and tentacles. Each chandelier Wallacavage constructs is unique with their wide array of pastel, glittery colors and their endless ocean-life motifs. These include green seashells, purple tentacles, pink pearls, and even big, round eyes starring straight at you. Some of his chandeliers seem to be inspired by the pastel colors and ornate design of the Rococo period, while his other chandeliers have a louder palette with strange faces and eyes. His octopus creations create a surrealistic atmosphere as each sea monster is suspended from the ceiling, reaching out its tentacles, which happen to hold the chandelier lighting. After seeing Wallacavage’s highly imaginative and extravagant chandeliers, you realize how much chandeliers already looked like octopus! Not only can you find the artist’s octopus chandeliers in several New York City galleries, Wallacavage is also an accomplished photographer. He even has a book published on his photography titled Monster Sized Monsters available in many museum stores.

Anamorphic Illusions Of Painted Spaces Create Living Picture Frames

Anamorphic Illusions

Anamorphic Illusions photography

Anamorphic Illusions photographs

 

In their series, “Anamorphoses,” French artists Ella and Pitr (Papiers Peintres) transform forgotten, run-down places into colorfully framed spaces that create anamorphic illusions. The duo paints frames onto stairwells, empty rooms, and hallways, giving the normally 2D experience of a frame the depth of 3D. The photographs have to be taken at a particular angle in order to create the desired shot of a figure inside the painted canvas. The outcome is a whimsical portrait that lends playful depth to an otherwise drab and neglected setting. The artists completed these installations and photographs as part of a project for National Dramatic Center of St Etienne. (via my modern met)