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Joana Vasconcelos Crochets A Crafty Second “Skin” For Ceramic Animals

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Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos creates a “second skin” for kitschy-looking ceramic figurines. Animals such as dogs, wolves, snakes, and more are concealed in Vasconcelos’ delicately-crocheted coverings, which are reminiscent of a blanket that your grandmother might have worked on. Whatever surface treatment is underneath, the artist’s handiwork is obscured by small-yet-elaborate flowers that fit over her subjects like a glove.

The nature of Vasconcelos’ work is about the decontextualization of everyday objects. Crochet is often seen as a craft, but here she’s removed it from any sort of practical purpose (like providing warmth or being used in the home) and transformed it into an art object. It now occupies two dichotomies, hand-crafted and industrial, in which the former wraps the latter, mass-produced object underneath.

There’s another way to view Vasconcelos’ sculptures, and that’s applying a narrative to them, like they’re characters in a story. In this respect, it’s seems as though she’s creating a protective garment for them and that her subjects are in need of care. The crochet acts as a shell that gives the illusion of protection from the unknown. (Via Fubiz)

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David Samuel Stern Physically Weaves Portraits Together, Showing Two Different Sides Of His Subjects

David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait

Brooklyn based artist David Samuel Stern takes still photographs, and fuses them together so that they appear to be in motion. He begins by taking two portraits of the same person, and then carefully and meticulously cuts them apart before physically weaving them back into one another. This not only creates amazing texture and an interesting checkered pattern, but combines physical features until the composition.

become a hybrid of two faces. With a light and airy palette, these breathtaking photographic prints become ghosts of themselves, two versions or the same person. Two different emotions are often present, creating an interesting dichotomy of the internal character. We are seeing two sides of the subjects, as the weaving alters and skews our perspective. Stern’s highly original technique abstracts the portraits so that they seem to be caught in mid motion. Both original images become blurred after they are combines by weaving. The once crisp photographic prints are transformed by their alteration, creating a painterly atmosphere. David Samuel Stern’s method is simple yet powerful, exposing two sides of each of his subjects. However, the abstraction present in his work also hides elements and details of the portraits as well.

You can see David Samuel Stern’s mesmerizing, photographic work on view at the BAM Harvey Theater in New York City from September 16 through December 20th.

Book 3 Iphone Sneak Peak!

Sorry for the bad iphone photographs but I wanted to give all of you a nice sneak peak into our next issue! This advance copy just flew in by way of of our friends at Fedex and it’s looking like our best issue to date! Book 3 features over 100 artists and designer from around the world who created images around the theme “The Underdogs.” If you’re looking for a book to inspire you and get your creative juices flowing then this is the book for you! This issue will be available at the end of March and will be offered in a limited edition of 1,500. Make sure to subscribe today as this issue WILL SELL OUT! More images after the Jump!

Soft Silicone Rubber Soul Sculpture

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Iconic and lovely Louise Bourgeois once said, “The feminists took me as a role model, as a mother. It bothers me. I am not interested in being a mother. I am still a girl trying to understand myself.”

Likewise, one might suggest that the soft and silicone rubber sculptures of Michelle Carla Handel, collected here, are conceptually doing something similar, but with a splash of Claes Oldenburg’s wit and color pop.

Each piece feels intriguingly pubescent: exploring the grotesque softness of bodies and gender through seemingly pliable forms that physically confuse or bend out of shape, emotionally heaving with discovery and wear.

Observing A Creative Culture

DeChazier Stokes-Johnson has relaunched The Marma Spot, a collection of interviews done with a wide range of known and unknown creatives from around the world. From design here Stefan Sagmeister to  Run Athletics sneaker designer Rashid Young. Some good reading for those trying to find creative inspiration.

Video Watch: Jason Mitcham’s Animation Created By Thousands Of Slight Alterations On A Single Painting

Jason Mitcham paints scenes from everyday America, and for The Avett Brothers’ new music video, he was commissioned to use his paintings to tell the story of an American city. For the video, Jason made an animation by painting each “frame” over one another on the same canvas thousands of times over. I love it because you get to see the painting process in a really unique way–normally we only get a finished product, but in the video we get to see strokes that make something and are then covered, erased, and made into another image ad infinitum. Half of the pleasure of this video is watching the ghosted images from previous frames. It works in a more figurative way too, in that the trace images represent the lingering of history in the present.  Check out the video after the jump!

Jo Hamilton’s Crochet Heads

It’s not everyday that we post an artist who works with yarn but Jo Hamilton’s crochet portraits are really interesting. I’m really happy that Jo decided to not over finish these and left them without a background and with the yarn hanging down. Sort of looks like paint drips and adds another dimension to the work that you don’t see often in crochet.