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Shirin Abedinirad’s Mirror Installations In The Barren Desert Bring Heaven Closer To Earth

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Sometimes reflection is more powerful than projection.  In Shirin Abedinirad’s mirror installations reflection means seeing the sky change into something else or enhancing an ancient setting by expanding scale and perspective.  By showing these in a different light an alternate reality is born. In “Evocation” Shirin fills the barren desert with round mirror discs reflecting the sky which become reflected pools of imaginary water. The precious commodity is shown with laser like precision in its alien environment. As the light and environment change at different times so does the liquid  mirage depending on how the sand and wind blow over the mirrors.

In “Heaven on Earth” ancient architecture provides impetus to another reflection. It prompts the viewer to recognize shape and its relation to space. The reflective material is placed on a staircase which makes something grander than what it already is. It turns an already spiritual place into more using the mirror’s ability to expand and see upward as a symbol for the great unknown.

Shirin can be considered a conceptual artist since most if not all of her work is steeped in ideas that transport and transform. She’s also a great illusionist by how she uses the real to create something ethereal and imaginary. (via bored panda)

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Leandro Erlich

leandro erlich shattering doorLeandro Erlich should be everyones favorite Argentinean installation artist. He could even be my favorite artist of all time. Leandro simple kills it! He was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and now lives and works in Paris, France. His latest project, “Shattering Door,” is on display at Luciana Brito, São Paulo, Brazil. Make sure to check out more of his projects in his stunning portfolio.

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Neil Morley



Hailing grom London, artist Neil Morley creates his multi-layered works using college techniques. Morley is influenced by artists like Sigmar Polke, and uses reproductions of nineteenth century reportage etchings from the London Illustrated News and satirical magazines such as Punch. His work is a reflection on his research on travel, tourism, colonialism, and post-colonialism. The paintings create parallels between nineteenth century colonialism and twenty-first century tourism: “Tourism is one of the largest industries in the world and has arguably had the most influence on First World perceptions of utopia such as white, sandy beaches, clear blue sea, simplicity and adventure couched in luxury.  Tourism has the propensity to mask realities such as poverty, poor infrastructure, and dictatorship. The all–inclusive resort and the heavily structured guided tour itineraries cherry pick and conceal these realities.” Packing a very heavy/important message makes his work that much more interesting.


Jon Pyzel- The Art Of Hand-Shaped SurfBoards

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Jon Pyzel has been part of the surfing community for as long as he can remember, growing up surfing from a young age in the historic surfing town of Santa Barbara, CA. After traveling around surfing and competing, Jon realized that he needed to surf better waves in warmer water, making a permanent move to an even bigger surfing location, the North Shore of Oahu. Getting his start fixing surfboards in a factory, Jon quickly learned the ins and outs of the business working his way up from fixing basic dings on boards to working under some of the best shapers and glassers in the industry.

Finally setting off on his own, Pyzel has become one of the most sought after board shapers for weekend warriors as well as pro surfers from around the world. Shaping each board from scratch, Pyzel knows every curve, bend, and turn on the masterfully crafted boards that he builds.

In the age of mass manufacturing Jon Pyzel has had the conscious decision to take things back to the basics with his world class hand-shaped surfboards. The result is master craftsmanship and attention to detail that only decades of experience and a steady hand can provide.

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Young-Deok Seo’s Inventive Bike Chain Sculptures

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Young-Deok Seo uses the human figure as the core of his work, though material is an ever present, and surprisingly inventive, concern. Using bought and discarded bicycle chains, the young South Korean artist spends months constructing and welding his pieces, with larger pieces taking even longer. Although the majority of his intricate constructions are manifested through the human form, there is an ever-present emotional quality present, oftentimes that of hurt and loss. While some figures physiques are the pinnacle of human perfection, others are faceless, in positions of mourning, or shattered upon the gallery floor. The viewer can easily make the assumption that the links Seo uses go past material and into metaphor, connecting chains to our manufactured, and fractured, world.

The artist explains, “We get to deal with lots of relationships in our fiercely competitive society. And from those relationships, we get desire for materials.To portray the mankind as a being which are bound to many things around them, I use the material that is also bound and also connected to each other….material restrict and choke each other.Modern people’s addiction to the material can be stood up as a main theme, in this way.” (via myampgoesto11)

New work by Jan Kalwejt!


Jan Kalwejt, who contributed the amazing “Lung Music” shirt for Beautiful/Decay Apparel has a bunch of new works up on his site. Check ’em out!


Strange Cams

We love DIY art and design here at B/D, so it goes without saying that home made Strange Cams certainly caught our eye. An ongoing project initiated by Los Angeles artists Aurelia Friedland and Michael Manalo, Stange Cams investigates the affordances of defamiliarized, modified, low technology instruments, and how those instruments can shift a user’s perspective (literally) on the community and environment around them. I love the sketchy approach the artists took in designing these new cameras – who would have thought a good ol’ roll of duck-tape, a can of spray paint, and some CVS brand disposable cameras would lead to a whole new genre of photography?  Check out more of the resulting photographs, and some of the Strange Cams themselves after the jump.

Toni Gallo

Delicately painted portraits by Toni Gallo where the body is stripped away and replaced by the subjects accessories, personal belongings and various forms of flora.