Get Social:

Scott Jarrett’s Abandoned Decay

Scott jarrett photography

Scott Jarrett documents buildings that have been beaten, bruised and neglected by their owners and community. This is some serious beautiful decay.

Advertise here !!!

Chu Teppa’s Little White Dolls Of Mythological Goddesses

Chu Teppa - Sculptures 2 Chu Teppa - Sculptures 5

Chu Teppa - Sculptures 9

Chu Teppa - Sculptures 4

The world of Chu Teppa is magical. She recalls memories from her childhood and from those she creates mythological goddesses. Among the seven dolls forming the family, there’s Cîz, Goddess of light, predictions and hope riding her swan and leading a bottled frog; Dvü, Goddess of inspiration and fertility with her cat nose and Hyê Goddess of maternity, kindness and antics holding two pigs and wearing a pig nose herself.

Each doll is white, a color dear to Chu Teppa which, according to her, brings peace and comfort. Interested in the expression of feelings and emotions, she uses white as a mask, a layer that helps forget worries. In opposition, the touch of vivid colors symbolizes life as joy and pain. Wanting to design tender sculptures, the artist nevertheless claims that imperfection is part of being human and that it shouldn’t be forgotten.
If color has a strong meaning in the art of Chu Teppa, the 3 lettered names of the goddesses are even more relevant. The number three, according to the artist, is an expression of artistic expression, vital optimism and abundance.

The artist is sensible to the duality between clarity and darkness. Two concepts that are identified by almost everyone and part of their mission “to transcend into eternal light as we evolve”. Through her fantasy universe, her goddesses and her symbols, Chu Teppa suggests an introspection of the combination of agony and its polar opposite, pleasure.

Advertise here !!!

Musical Rain Gutters Wall

Artist always need to make their homes different. We collect designer furniture, find old design treasures at flea markets and estate sales, and go the extra mile to make our homes uniquely ours. Apparently the same goes for the artsy neighborhood of Neustadt Kunsthofpassage in Dresden, Germany. Designed by Christoph Roßner, Annette Paul, and Andre Tempel who all live in the building, the rain gutter house is truly a work of kinetic art bringing together rainfall and a complex system of rain gutters that weave in and out of one another on the buildings facade. The result is a musical symphony of sound everytime it rains, making the house one of the largest instruments and an awesome display of what a bit of creativity can create! Watch a video of the house in action after the jump!

Breanne Trammell is Larger Than Life

Breanne Trammell’s work is categorized by oversized every day objects created in monumental proportions. Her work is playful, inspiring, and just plain intriguing. Her candy cigarette installation is genius with giant cigarettes decorated like rainbow sprinkles, Reese’s cups, Sweettarts, Swedish fish and Junior Mints. In addition to her larger than life sculptures, she also incorporates patterns, prints, and 2D expertise into her body of work. 

Awesome Video Of The Day: Luke Million- Arnold


As if being Mr. Universe, an interantional action film star, The Governator, and your favorite old ladies babies daddy wasn’t enough Mr. Arnold Schwarzenegger is now making his breakthrough in music with this collabo with Luke Million. What’s next Arnold? Are you going to become a firefighter and an astronaut? Get pumped up and watch the full video after the jump!

Alejandra Villasmil

Alejandra Villasmil

Alejandra Villasmil is a Venezuelan artist who lives and works out of Santiago de Chile since 2007. I like the broad scope of work and use of absurd sculptural mediums.

B/D Flickr Creative Pic Pool: Tom Hudson

tom hudson collage

On the last day of 2009 we thought we’d pick yet another dedicated B/D Flickr Creative Pic Pool members work to post on the blog. This time we bring you Tom Hudson’s hyperspectrum colored collages displayed on his Flickr page full of tasty illustrations, collages, and other eye candy. Tom is 1/4 of a collective called the ‘Nous Vous’, who create everything from drawings to noise performances. That’s quite the spectrum if you ask me.

Remember to join the B/D Flickr Creative Pic Pool as we are always looking for new ways to promote our readers & members! Here’s to an awesome new year filled with tons of visual stimuli!

Sandra Osip Sculpts Ruined And Piled-Up Houses Inspired By Detroit’s Decay

Sandra Osip, Broken Dreams - Sculpture Sandra Osip, Broken Dreams - Sculpture Sandra Osip, Broken Dreams - Sculpture Sandra Osip, Broken Dreams - Sculpture

In a dark series of sculptures titled Broken Dreams, Brooklyn-based artist Sandra Osip captures the decline and decay of suburban Detroit. The works are inspired by Osip’s memories of the city: the streets she roamed as a child, the corner stores she visited, and the neighbourhood—now destroyed—that surrounded her former high school. She sculpts the skeletal husks of houses that are burnt down, collapsed, and decaying, evacuated of all life and purpose. In more abstract renderings, Osip has created “junk heaps” of urban ruin, crushed-up buildings that represent entire neighbourhoods left to the cruel forces of time and neglect. In the following statement, Osip explains the deeply personal inspiration for the series:

“Recently I visited my childhood neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan, and to my disbelief my house was no longer standing; neither was the corner store where I bought my penny candy, nor my friend’s house down the street, nor the empty lot I used to ice skate on. This is now an empty wasteland and overgrown by nature. The day after my visit the news reported that a block away from where I lived they found two decomposing bodies. The news stated at least a dozen bodies in twelve months have been found in this abandoned and neglected part of the city.” (Source)

Nostalgia is a painful concept in these sculptures; instead of comforting childhood origins, Osip is left with rootless memories, and a sense of “home” that’s deteriorating and forever changed—haunted, even, by literal images of death in the form of human bodies. “Many of my fond memories have now vanished,” she goes on to write, explaining the pain of having part of one’s personal history obliterated. She approaches the series with a profound awareness tinged with irony; one work, titled “Beautiful Homes and Gardens,” incongruously depicts a stack of cadaver-like houses. However, by consciously reworking her attachments to the now-ruined streets of her youth, Osip’s work demonstrates a courageous exercise of healing through the release of the past.

Visit Osip’s website to view more of her works.