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Stewart Gough’s High Tech Machines

London based Stewart Gough’s high-tech sculptures look like a mixture between NASA space explorers, mad scientist chemistry labs, and futuristic war machines. However they are all built out of everyday materials such as plastic plates, pipe fittings, tape, nylon strings and other everyday materials you could get at your neighborhood hardware store. (via theeyestheysee)

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Lauren Tickle’s Exquisite Jewelry Made From US Currency

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Artist Lauren Tickle uses an unconventional material for her accessories: US currency. Titled Increasing Value, the objects are made out of bills, silver, latex, and more, formed into intricate pieces that you can actually wear. Tickle has her Master’s degree in jewelry, and the exquisite works don’t immediately strike the viewer as being composed of currency. Instead, the designs take advantage of the bold flourishes we see on money and the green lines appear as a pattern rather than a past president’s face.

Tickle writes about the conceptual meaning behind her work, which is titled based on how much currency was used in its creation.

My work is an experiment in the concepts of value and adornment. The Values Exploration process takes currency of defined value, distills it to graphic elements, then resynthesizes an object of much greater value. How and why are these notes distanced from their face value? Idea, concept, process, and labor create value. Is this new, finished form a microcosm of industrial production? or a parody?
I force wearers and observers to reflect on the concept of adornment in our society. One of the most conscious actions humans undertake is the decision of what to wear or not. My work takes underlying materialism and makes it explicit, imploring evaluation from all sides in each social context. (via Escape Kit)

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Masha Rumyantseva

A nice selection of collages from russian illustrator Masha Rumyantseva that will simultaneously take you back in time and bring you to a new future.

Dawn Of Man Turns Empty City Walls Into Napping Spots For Tired Giants

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The New York-based art collective Dawn of Man has created site-specific video installations that bring peace and tranquility to the “city that never sleeps.” Entitled Projection Napping — which is a clever play on the technique, project mapping — the group transforms peeling walls, dark alcoves, and sky-high edifices into refuges for larger-than-life human beings. In each work, the characters appear to “settle down” into their respective spaces, curling up against the walls or dangling their legs off the edges. In a statement provided to The Creators Project, Dawn of Man explains their creative intent and the effect of their project:

“Projection Napping […] juxtapos[es] the calm, meditative state of napping against the kinetic, high energy noise of the sleepless city. An unsuspecting audience usually emerges at each location, often sparked with intrigue, sometimes enlightenment, and always a whole lot of questions” (Source).

What is also fascinating about the juxtaposition of the city’s chaos with the sleepers’ serenity is the public demonstration of a private experience. When we sleep (or nap), we allow ourselves to become open and vulnerable. Thus, when Dawn of Man’s sleeping giants turn over, rub their eyes, or lean exhaustedly against a wall, we are voyeurs to a moment of intimacy and perceived solitude. It is easy in the city to feel alienated from the life all around us, but thanks to this fascinating project, barren walls and cold architecture have been reinvested as landscapes of warmth and humanity.

Check out the video above to see the projections in motion. Dawn of Man’s website can be found here. (Via The Creators Project)

 

Aaron Leif Nicholson

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Aaron Leif Nicholson has an affinity for creating life-sized sculptures of imposing characters (like witch doctors and Yetis) that seem to have stepped straight out of a nightmare. Nicholson’s “Coney Island Star Man” is a prime example: faceles and hunched over the ground, he lurks on a beach as if he’s watching you. Nicholson brings his sculptural background to other works as well, which include mixed-media drawings and paintings, lending traditionally two-dimensional art a three-dimensional quality.

Andrew Knapp’s Photographs Of Hide and Seek With His Dog

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There’s a dog in every one of these photographs. Do you see it? Based on a famous game, Andrew Knapp and his border collie Momo find a variety of places to play hide and seek. Urban areas, grassy parks, graffitied walls and rocky terrain are just some of where you can spot Momo (or at least try). Knapp and his furry friend play this ongoing game called Find Momo with the fans of their blog around the world.

This light-hearted and amusing series is reminiscent of the Where’s Waldo books that many of us enjoyed as kids. Momo is good at hiding, and it’s genuinely difficult to spot him in some of these photographs. Further adding to the feeling of nostalgia, Knapp applies a vintage filter to his images, and they look like they are memories of another time.

If you didn’t know the premise behind them, you can still enjoy these images for the quirky American landscapes that they are. (Via DeMilked)

Ilona Gaynor Is Designing A Bank Robbery

 

Ilona Gaynor is a designer and image maker hailing from the UK. Her latest project, Under Black Carpets, leverages bank heists as a medium of design. Through a series of intensive design and research exercises, Gaynor is using the strategies and vocabularies of robbery as a method for storytelling. Perhaps the most bizarre fact about the project is that is actually a collaborative effort with the NYC FBI Department of Justice and the LAPD archival department. Geoff Manaugh puts it well, stating that the project is an investigation into the “use and misuse of the cityscape where by architecture is considered both the obstacle and the tool to bridge or separate you from what you’re looking for” in both legal and illegal agendas. The project, ongoing, is currently comprised of an obsessive collection of materials that range from photographs of bank entrances to scale-models of get away cars. The project truly feels like the work of an insane person… and I mean that in the best way possible.

Pavel Samokhvalov’s Provocative Day-Glo Nude Photography

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Photographer Pavel Samokhvalov captures intriguing images of the nearly-nude body set against day-glow neon lighting. The provocative photos feature models clad in see-through hosiery and whose bodies are bent and contorted towards the camera. Often, their faces are obscured by hair or poses. Samokhvalov will also only shoots part of the torso, zeroing-in on a small tattoo or glitter-covered nipple.

The photographer does a lot of editorial work, specifically in the fashion realm. His background is cinematography from the Moscow Film Institute, and this training can be seen in his work. The images tell a story, and each fuschia-colored background is one piece of a larger puzzle. They double as character studies, showcasing a product while at the same time providing subtle clues about the nature of the pieces and the people who wear them. (Via Scene 360)