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Artwork Of The Day: Everything Was Beautiful…

Meryl Pataky

Poetic and haunting neon installations by Meryl Pataky. The slight shift in color in the letters in the piece above is absolutely amazing.

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ARTIST INTERVIEW: JUSTIN JOHN GREENE

Red Room - acrylic and oil on canvas, 36" x 60" 2009

Los Angeles has always held a special place in the hearts and minds of Americans, but for most it exists in an almost fictional capacity.  Hollywood isn’t a real place – it’s a postcard, a huge sign on the side of a mountain bracketed with strategically placed palm tree silhouettes.  Certainly not a place to call home, but for artist Justin John Greene that’s exactly what it is.  Hollywood is a part of his heritage, and the work reflects that.  Born and raised in the Los Angeles area, Greene’s work is strongly imbued with the history of the most romanticized industry in American culture.  In his most recent solo show at Actual Size (an exhibition space he co-runs in the Chinatown gallery district of east L.A.) the influence of the film industry is in full focus.  You Oughta Be In Pictures is a comprehensive installation that utilizes painting, sculpture, and video to create a truly immersive experience for the viewer.  Installation may seem like a bit of a leap from Greene’s primarily two dimensional practice, but a closer look into the artist’s process bridges the gap seamlessly.  His work is a distinctly enjoyable blend of sly historical references, direct compositional tactics, and cleverly applied humor.  If you have the opportunity to see the work in person I strongly encourage you to do so.

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Kate Clements’ Stunning And Fragile Glass Crowns

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Kate Clements is artist whose primary focus is kiln-fired glass. These delicate icicly glass crowns are representative of many things: power, decadence, excess, and decorum, but the fragility of their forms undermine the seeming permanence of this status symbol. There’s something fanastical and menacing about these glass sculptures. The mythological associations one encounters upon regarding these crowns inspires a sense of wonder and magic, the consequences of which our old fairy tales can never seem to stop reminding us. Of her work, Clements says:

“I construct decorative, non-functional glass headdresses to initiate a new conversation about narcissistic female adornment. Throughout history the cultural construction of feminine identity has contributed to a persistent desire by women to transcend what nature has given them physically. I believe these gestures of transformation are made selfishly and with pleasure, in hopes to achieve a fantasy. The glass headdresses function as a separation between viewer and ‘wearer.’ This distance enables the ‘wearer’ to be transformed into the fantastical creature; however, this distance is only a counterfeit perfection.

I am interested in women’s attempts to fit popular cultural representation and how often this results in a suspension of their critical self-awareness. How women’s efforts to fulfill these representations can lead to feelings of guilt and the simultaneous assertion of individual power and the creation of a ‘feminine mystique.’ Finally I am interested in the adornments of the celebration of the ‘perfect’ woman. These celebrations can include beauty queens, exotic dancers, and ironically in it’s most extreme manifestation: the bride. ” (via my amp goes to 11)

Eric Timothy Carlson

Eric Carlson - Figures From Life

Eric Timothy Carlson is a renaissance man interested in all forms of art and design. His “Figures from Life” illustrations are some of the most beautiful I have seen today. Carlson reinvents already existing images by integrating simple, but bold forms that obscure or transform the subject. Also lovely are his print and typographic projects that he does in collaboration with Michael Cina. Make sure you check out his work in our upcoming book Supernaturalism!

Mess Lab Interviews Amir Fallah

 

 

Mess Lab recently caught up with founder/Creative Director/main man Amir at Pool tradeshow. Watch Amir discuss the Beautiful/Decay brand, and give advice for anyone looking to get into the art/fashion/design fields!

Monica Rohan Paints Self-Portraits Being Swallowed Up By A Beautiful Vortex Of Patterned Fabric

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Monica Rohan paints realistic self-portraits where she is covered, buried, and engulfed in fabric. Although we see the artist portrayed in many different setting in her paintings, we can never see her face. Each of her subjects, all being representations of herself, hide their face in the mass of textiles. Rohan beautifully depicts different types of fabric, vivid in color and pattern. She is a master at bringing to life vibrant hues on different thread. Sometimes, there is no fabric in her paintings, but instead a sheet of grass or a plethora of flowers that stretch over the figure. Each sheet or quilt wraps around the figures, surrounding them as it moves across the composition. Although Rohan’s work appears lighthearted and playful at first, with frolicking and mischievous women, there is a level of anxiety present in her work. Each figures seems to be frantically attempting to hide their identity, almost desperately trying to hide. Mountains of patched fabric and colorful silk are swallowing up the artist’s likeness, sometimes consuming two figures at a time.

Monica Rohan, originally from Australia, is inspired by her upbringing in the remote countryside of Queensland. A sense of isolation can be felt in her paintings, as the only person present in her work is the artist herself. You can feel the artist’s emotions about to burst out of the many folds of the fabric as they create a powerful vortex of movement around her own self. (via Hi-Fructose)