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Jyo John Mulloor Designed Customized Bike Helmets That Look Like Realistic Shaved Heads

Jyo John Mulloor Jyo John MulloorJyo John Mulloor Jyo John Mulloor

Looking for eye catching bike helmets might soon be a thing of the past if digital designer Jyo John Mulloor has anything to do with it. He has been experimenting with different ways to capture people’s attention on the roads, and has designed a set of four surreal looking helmets. While they are not yet available to purchase, or even more than digital prototypes, they are still an amusing idea, and a lighthearted approach to the serious issue of road safety.

One version comes complete with a man’s ears on the side, looking like a weird detachable scalp. Another has a pair of old-fashioned aviator goggles stretched over the top as if the wearer could pull them down while zooming down the road. The combination of the striking high resolution images with some serious head protection, Mulloor’s helmets are sure to be a crowd pleaser. And would no doubt make motorists more aware of the person inside of them. (Via Design Boom)

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Dev Harlan

 

Dev Harlan is a multidisciplinary artist whose hybrid practice combines the physical and the virtual with the use of sculpture, light and projection. Utilizing innovative video projection mapping techniques, Harlan controls and shapes the projected image into precision alignment with his sculptural forms. Through his masterful use of this hybrid video technique Harlan makes the intuitive a reality and gives the works rhythms and a dialogue that set their own pace. Using a palette of strong, assertive colors, kinetic geometries, and varying vantage points the artist projects an intuitive dialogue onto the sculptures that is succinct and cohesive. (via stacythinx)

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Fred Eerdekens’ Shadow Typography Art

Fred Eerdekens’ work combines shadows and and typography to create experimental artworks that lie somewhere between installation and sculpture. Each piece relies on the perfectly lit gallery space to create the visual tricks and the process of the work is revealed as viewers walk around and interact with the work. Not restricted by one material Eerdekens uses everything from artificial cloud formations (pictured above) that spell out “neo deo” to food boxes (after the jump) that are arranged to cast the shadow “Come Home”.

Jason Rhoades Amazingly Intricate Neon Installations

Jason Rhoades - installation

Jason Rhoades - installation

Jason Rhoades - installation

Jason Rhoades, who lived and worked in Los Angeles up until his death in 2006, created amazing, over-the-top, often overwhelming, generally disorienting installations.  Using neon, plastic buckets, power tools, snaking wires, figurines, sound and other odds and ends Rhoades created work that is engaging, witty and visually spectacular.

Known as “scatter art,” Rhoades’ environments combine a multiplicity of ideas.  In works like The Creation Myth, originally installed in 1998, and now re-created for his retrospective at the ICA in Philadelphia, Rhoades created sculptural forms representing how humanity processes information, forms memories and produces things like art.  The work often contains biographical, sexual and sometimes outright vulgar elements that require a viewer’s patience and open-mindedness.  Seemingly arbitrary, each artifact has its purpose within Rhoades’ installations.

Overloading a viewer with information and visual content replete with metaphors and symbols, Rhoades purposefully creates his installations to avoid finite conclusions.  In many ways Rhoades’ works mirror human thought—they layer information and content in seemingly incoherent ways forming multiple, usually incomplete notions and assumptions.

Rhoades’ retrospective will be on view at the Philadelphia ICA through December 29.

Michael Wolf’s Copy Artists

Michael Wolf’s photographs of Chinese copy artists is absolutely brilliant. I’ve always heard stories about how you can get anything copied in China for dirt cheap but  this series absolutely blows me away. I love the tiled alleys that the photos are taken in and the casual nature of the copycats. For instance check out the water flowing towards the painting in the above image. What if that really was the Mona Lisa? Can you imagine someone dragging it into the alley into a puddle for a quick photo op?

Shu Yong’s Creates The Worlds Weirdest Waterfall Out Of Toilets, Sinks And Urinals

Shu Yong

Shu Yong

Shu Yong

Shu Yong

Chinese artist Shu Yong created an atypical waterfall using upwards of 10,000 recycled toilets, sinks and urinals.  The project took two months for Shu Young and his team to complete and covers a wall 100 meters long and 5 meters high.  Originally designed for the Foshan Pottery and Porcelain Festival, a porcelain product tradeshow, the piece is now installed as a permanent piece of public art.  Each toilet was connected to a tap so that they could be flushed—the point being to give a viewer an idea of just how much water is used in a city as large as Foshan.

Shu Yong typically works in many mediums, ranging from painting, photography, sculpture and performance, always interested in “bubbles.”  For Shu, bubbles are not just a symbol, they’re also a concept.  Shu says, “I use various methods to deduce bubble, making it a totem in both conception and form.”  Alongside the Toilet Waterfall Shu installed one of his “Bubble Women,” a sculpture of ballooning women’s breasts.  A seemingly unusual pairing, Shu uses the Bubble Women as a reflection of the motivations and interests of modern day society.  Juxtaposing the two works makes for a bizarre, yet strangely effective, commentary on contemporary culture.  Shu believes in using such provocative work to address cultural mythology, politics and contemporary anxiety in China, or as he calls it, “his laboratory.”  (via amusingplanet)

Cedric Laquieze Uses Parts Of Insects To Construct Exquisite Fairies

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Amsterdam-based artist Cedric Laquieze has recently completed an exquisite series of taxidermy Fairies. These probably aren’t the type of fairies you’re imagining – no Tinkerbell-looking creatures here. Instead, the small, delicate sculptures are constructed using a myriad of different insect species, bones, seeds, and even scorpion parts, giving them a quasi-bug look.

Laquieze uses the brilliant blues, greens, oranges, and more to form the fairies’ wings, headdresses, and bodies. The insects are meticulously crafted and seamlessly integrate all of the otherwise disparate parts into a whole. While they might not look like the typical storybook cartoons, they are definitely more detailed and visually intriguing. The artist’s interpretation lends itself to darker, less cheery tales where fairies don’t have to be good. (Via Archie McPhee)

Dean Sullivan

DeanSullivan3

Dean Sullivan is like that doodling space-obsessed boy who sat behind you in kindergarten and claimed he really, honestly, for real had an alien abduction experience once and monsters living in his closet.