Get Social:

Kent Michael Smith’s Suspended Geometry

Gestural fluid abstraction and geometric patterns usually don’t well together but Kent Michael Smith has figured out a way to make them live harmoniously on the same surface. By using resin inbetween layers of paint he manages to combine these two disparate forms of mark making that reference Nascar color schematics, hunting gear, camouflage, and graffiti.

Advertise here !!!

Incredible Sculpture Makes Liquid Flow Backwards Into Oil Can- Or Does It?

Supermajor from matt kenyon on Vimeo.

For SWAMP’s piece Supermajor (a term used in the Gulf Coast referring to the six biggest publicly owned oil companies) the artist collective has created an ingenious and perplexing sculpture that will surely make you take a double take. In the gallery a wire rack of (vintage) oil cans sits.  One oilcan has a visible fissure out of which oil slowly flows cascading onto the pedestal and gallery floor…  The only thing is, the oil isn’t exactly flowing out of the can. Instead, oil appears to slow slowly drop by drop back into the can.  At times the drops of oil hover unsupported in midair. Other times the drops are in the process of a slow motion splash onto the pedestal. This is a piece that can only be fully appreciated in person or on video as the oil literally looks like it is moving backwards in time back into the can.

SWAMP (Studies of Work Atmosphere and Mass Production) was founded in 1999 by artists Douglas Easterly and Matt Kenyon. Focusing on critical themes addressing the effects of global corporate operations, mass media and communication, military-industrial complexes, and general meditations on the liminal area between life and artificial life.

Watch the video above and after the jump to see the piece in action! (via)

Advertise here !!!

Click To Collect- AFFORDABLE ARTIST ORIGINALS By Ryan Riss

Permanent Vacation, 2010
10 x 10 inches, Ink on archival paper, $250

It’s that time once again to share with you our newest works of art available for purchase through Click To Collect, Beautiful/Decay’s campaign to help art lovers start their collection of original artists works at affordable prices. Our featured artist this week is the talented Ryan Riss who manages to make even the most sober straight laced folks have acid flashbacks via his ornate black and white drawings. We’ve collaborated with Ryan many times over the last couple of years but this is the very first time we’re offering his original drawings for sale. I hope you’re as excited as we are to be able to get your hands on real hand made works of art that won’t break the bank! Read more about Ryan’s work, see detail images of these gorgeous drawings, and find out more about Click To Collect after the jump!

Le Goff & Gabarra

Le Goff and Gabarra

Le Goff & Gabarra is a design agency based in Paris. Their work demonstrates an understanding of bold colors and strong typography. I’m partial to their physical typographic works, especially their work for 6 scope. That 6 made out of water looks pleasantly scientific (check that one out after the jump). Good job to you Le Goff & Gabarra, keep ’em comin’!

Installation Five Scion Art Tour: Portland

Scion Installation Five

Opening Reception
Thursday, August 6th, 2009 | 6-10pm
Igloo Gallery | ON Gallery | Virtuoso Studios, 323-325 NW 6th St. Portland, OR 97209 [Between Everett and Flanders]

Painting: AJ Fosik, Alex Hornest, Andrew Schoultz, Asylm, Blek le Rat, Codak, David O’Brien, Edwin Ushiro, Francesco LoCastro, French, J. Shea, Jeff Soto, Kelsey Brookes, Kofie, Lisa Alisa, Mark Mothersbaugh, Nicholas Harper, Patrick Martinez, Rob Abeyta Jr., Ron English, Sage Vaughn, Skypage, Souther Salazar, Stormie Mills, Tessar Lo, Todd Tourso, Usugrow, Will Barras, Yoskay Yamamoto

Photography: Angela Boatwright, Christina M. Felice, Eriberto Oriol, Eye One, Jamel Shabazz, Logan Hicks, Peter Beste, RETNA, Rick Rodney, Saber, Too Tall Jahmal

Video Art: El Yem, Ian Lynam, Peter Glover, Something In The Universe, David Choe

Music Provided By :
DJ Rad! | Doctor Adam

www.scion.com/installation

Seth Alverson’s Grotesque Paintings Of Deformed And Severed Body Parts

sethalverson1

sethalverson3 sethalverson4 sethalverson5

Artist Seth Alverson paints the body in a realistic fashion, but not in a way that looks aesthetically appealing. Severed hands, bizarre contortions, and skin linked together like a sausage casing are just some of the ways he’s depicted the figure. It stands in stark contrast to the Old Masters traditions of life-like renderings, which are all about idealizing and hiding flaws. Instead they’re in-your-face in a way that it’s hard to look away from.

There’s a range of grotesqueness, from detached body parts (bloody ends and all) to oversized hands, and finally to things that aren’t shameful, but our society dictates they are. This includes cellulite on thick legs or sagging breasts. They seem to mock the airbrushed media and when compared with Alverson’s other more ghastly alternatives, definitely aren’t as bad. (Via Hi Fructose)

Jesse Harris

Jesse Harris may be the hardest working man in business of being punker than you.  As both a vinyl signmaker and fine artist, Jesse is a great example of the DIY aesthetic perfected. Creating work that is both questioning yet precise, there is no doubt to Jesse’s intention- the message is the medium.

A Stunning Surrealist Film Shot Through A Drop Of Water And IPhone Lens Reflects The Power Of Simplicity

film2 film1

Japanese designer Dan Tomimatsu’s latest project is a short film film entitled O: -les amants d’eau-, based on a poem by fukudapero. It is a five minute surrealist film narrated in Japanese and subtitled in English which provides an oscillating view of different sceneries, places, and objects.

The magnificent simplicity of this film lies in the technical aspects of how it was made: Tomimatsu shot a drop of water through the hole of a 5 Yen coin, through the lens of an iPhone. The coin was stuck to the lens of the phone in such a way that filming through it would allow a close-up of the drop of water. The result is a truly dreamlike sequence of images, which are tinted, filtered, and displayed through the drop of water. The film plays a lot with the notion of movement and the fluid, unpredictable nature of water.

In this sense, the drop of water provided a sort of natural lens for the film to be shot through as well as a new angle concerning the iPhone as a legitimate filmmaking device. His project underlines the role of new media and technology within the realm of filmmaking and the process of creating something simple yet so intricately beautiful as a film shot through a drop of water.