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Jacob Escobedo Illustrates The Shins Album And Ray Bradbury’s Last Story

A beautiful of collection of mixed media illustrations by Jacob Escobedo including a bunch of artworks for The Shins as well as six illustrations for the June Science Fiction issue of The New Yorker that illustrated Ray Bradbury’s last published story. The New Yorker issue was released one day before Bradbury’s death.

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Pizza & Eating Stuff


Genevieve Gaukler created this really adorable series on the food chain- they look like 70’s Mr. Men or children’s book. Her subjects range from feeling guilty for eating meat, the digestive tract, shit, and its import to other animals, what happens to your body after you die, and stoner’s penchants for ordering pizza when they’re bored (and stoner’s penchants for also being pizza delivery men. Actually, not so cute stuff.

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Terrence Payne’s Narrative Paintings

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It is difficult not to imagine a narrative when seeing the work of Terrence Payne. The Minneapolis-based artist uses elements of design, iconography, typography, pattern and figure, all rendered in a decorative style and soft pallete but with subject matter that is anything but.  While the artist occasionally focuses on a central word or scrawled text behind the animals and repeating, archetypical figures, Payne’s paintings use loaded narratives that combine believable earnestness and well-intentioned antagonism.

To achieve the softness in the work, Payne first uses colored pencils to enhance the quality of light and jewel tones, then applies layers oil pastels which allows the the under-drawings show through. Payne says:

 “I want you (the viewer) to see the mechanism of it. The idea is just how can I reinforce the sense of this being artificial, that these people aren’t real. They are just representations of what I am thinking about

Terrence’s recent work has been concerned with “cataloging the human effects of trying to keep your head afloat in an increasingly polarized world of haves and have-nots” and “examining a person’s perceived place in society” and how that affects the way the work is perceived. This most recent work will be collected in an exhibition alongside Nick Howard (previously here) called Cake, at the artist-collective space Payne helped found, Rosalux Gallery in Northeast Minneapolis (which was named Twin Cities’ Best Gallery in 2013). Cake opens October 12th and runs through October 31st.

Disco Ball Destruction And More From Alejandro Almanza Pereda

The work of Alejandro Almanza Pereda is colored with a dark sort of humor.  While his installations are typically built of ordinary objects and materials, they are arranged with a near morbid wit.  In a way, Pereda’s work gives boringly safe everyday situations a sense of impending danger.  For example the last piece featured in this post is composed of what appears to be a section of the side of the ubiquitous high-rise building.  They’re the heavy price tagged windows of a luxury loft sans room or even people to enjoy the view.  The piece is aptly titled No Room With a View.

Jim O’Raw

Jim O’Raw’s silkscreened prints are a result of his fascination of cmyk printing techniques and the endless color manipulation and the experimental accidents  and imperfections that bring the work to life.

Sam3’s Giant silhouette Street Art

It’s hard to pull off an interesting silhouette in any medium but the sheer size of Sam3’s massive murals painted around the world demand your attention and respect. Mostly painted in the humble palette of black and white Sam3’s graphic silhouettes quietly shout out universal narratives and surreal messages.

Otoniel Borda Garzón’s Tornado-Like Wood Sculptures

Otoniel Borda Garzón

Otoniel Borda Garzón

Otoniel Borda Garzón is known for his use of repurposed wood to create intricately twisted installations that dominate their gallery settings. The Bogota-born Garzón creates shapes which resemble naturally destructive environmental forms, those which upset life and cause death and destruction. The insinuations of hurricanes, tornadoes and twisters is amplified by the use of splintered wood, which recalls the damage after extreme weather conditions. However, his choice of using wood is important to these piece’s message. Just as the tree’s death gives humans and animals a material to work with, Garzón continues this cycle by using wood that has also ‘died’ or lost its purpose, creating a metaphor for the constant cycle of life and death and reinvention.

This series of installations, which the artist calls Reserva, involves site-specific construction and a reaction to each individual exhibition space. For the Bogota International Art Fair, Garzón built a 40 foot high tornado (pictured above and below). The installation, which took almost three weeks to build, with an additional week to disassemble, both reminds the viewer of the instabilities of destruction, but also the possibilities of life. (via colossal and behance)