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Martin Feijoo Makes Fun Drawings Based On What Images He Sees In The Clouds

Martin Feijoo - Drawing Martin Feijoo - Drawing Martin Feijoo - DrawingMartin Feijoo - Drawing

 

Martin Feijoo’s drawings are inspired by what he imagines the clouds in the sky to look like. His blog offers an image of his own artwork alone, as well as a comparison between the original photograph of the clouds. It’s fun, if you can manage not to peak, to look at the clouds first and see what you see before looking at Faijoo’s images. His style is illustrative and bold, which helps to see his images quite clearly in the clouds on their own. He might pursue more play between the cloud and his image as he continues with this series, to blur the lines more between reality and his imagination.

Feijoo speaks about his inspiration to start the series on his website:

When I was a child I was told that clouds’ shapes were created by expert balloon twister clowns who live in the sky, so that they can keep entertaining children. On my last trip to Mexico I remembered this and I started to photograph clouds on the road. The result is Shaping Clouds, a series of illustrations where I drew the first thing that came into my mind when I saw these clouds that I imagine someone made for me.

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JeongMee Yoon

JeongMee YoonJeongMee Yoon
JeongMee Yoon’s current work, “The Pink and Blue Projects” explores the trends in cultural preferences and the differences in the tastes of children (and their parents) from diverse cultures, ethnic groups as well as gender socialization and identity. The work also raises other issues, such as the relationship between gender and consumerism, urbanization, the globalization of consumerism and the new capitalism. The topic seems to be well tread territory already but it’s still crazy to visualize. Some of the poses that these kids strike are interesting too.

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Mr. Bean As The Mona Lisa, Rembrandt And Other Iconic Paintings

Mr. Bean as Thomas More by Hans Holbein the Younger.

Mr. Bean as Thomas More by Hans Holbein the Younger.

Rodney Pike - digitally altered image

Mr. Bean as Vanity by Frank Cadogan Cowper.

Mr. Bean as Vanity by Frank Cadogan Cowper.

Rodney Pike - digitally altered image

If you are a fan of Mr Bean, beautiful paintings, internet memes, stupid expressions, or laughing out loud, you will love what caricature artist Rodney Pike has been up to lately. Basing this series on the skit from the TV show when Mr Bean sneezes on a painting (Whistler’s Mother), and ends up replacing her face with a cartoon one, Pike decided to take the joke one step further.

Who knew that Mr Bean’s dark eyebrows, large eyes, swollen nostrils and chin full of stubble would fit so well under a fair maiden’s headscarf? Or that he could so effortlessly turn Mona Lisa into a nosy neighbor peering over the fence, or into someone who is so smug with themselves it is repugnant? Not only are these Photoshopped images a display of Rowan Atkinson’s theatrical talent, but also of Pike’s vision to imagine what would fit together. Combining two very different styles and eras, Pike is able to re contextualize many historical paintings that no longer have relevance to our contemporary lives.

Adding Mr Bean’s face into these Renaissance and Medieval paintings, Pike has re awakened the art lover in all of us cultural-meme-obsessed fans. He tells the Daily Mail

“I think it just adds to the absurdity when working with such serious source material and Rowan Atkinson can make any situation funny no matter how absurd. He’s always lots of fun and it is good therapy and a welcome break to the stresses of work sometime.”

You can see more of his hilarious faces on his website here.
(Via Demilked)

Brendan Flanagan’s Twisted Paint

Brendan Flanagan paints twisting, twisted landscapes and figures that are at once growing and decaying.

THE SLAP Is A New Social Experiment Where 40 Random People Hit Each Other In The Face

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The Slap, a totally fresh video by filmmaker Max Landis, is a clever response to the famous First Kiss video that went viral three months ago and has been making all of us go awwww up until now. Landis’ video features 40 randomly paired people in a fairly uncomfortable situation – the goal for them was to slap each other in the face. Even if it’s the first time they had met.

According to the author, none of the participants were pressured to do so and all of them were “hit as hard as THEY asked to be hit”. The beauty of this project lies in the contrast between a somewhat violent action of hitting other person and the intimate feeling the participants develop towards each other.

Though Landis really was aiming to mock the famous First Kiss video (which is obvious from the black and white color palette and similar upbeat music), he did go beyond just that. His explanation video called Point Of Impact explains the reasons for him to make “The Slap” in the first place.

“What is violence? It’s really just a label, isn’t it, if you let your mind go to a dark place. I decided to define violence as “non-consensual physical interference;” <…> What is trust? Do you trust someone not to hurt you? Are you even thinking about it? Do you care if they hurt you if you trust them? <…> The theory was: A slap, robbed of its violating context, is more intimate than a kiss. My theory, as it turned out, was right.”

Btw, did you notice the cherry on top? At 1:48, there’s Haley Joel Osment (yup, the kid from The Sixth Sense) being slapped straight into his lush beard.

R. Crumb’s Underground at CSUF Grand Central Art Center

R. Crumb's Underground

 

R. Crumb’s Underground
Curated by Todd Hignite
July 11-August 16, 2009

 

July 11th launches Grand Central Art Center‘s opening reception for the Yerba Buena’s Center for the Arts traveling exhibit, “R.Crumb’s Underground.” This exhibition salutes San Francisco treasure Robert Crumb with an eclectic mix of early work, collaborations, and the world premiere of his “spool” drawings. Universally acknowledged as the founder of the underground comic scene, Crumb gained cult popularity for his pioneering Zap Comix and stardom with the Terry Zwigoff documentary, Crumb. The YBCA traveling exhibit also shows how his work has blossomed in philosophical complexity, highlighting his collaborative work, including intimate confessions produced with wife Aline Kominsky-Crumb.

 

For more information, click here.

 

Saturday, July 11, 2009

Opening Reception, 7-10PM

Free admission.

Beached Whale Is Actually A Hyper-realistic Installation

Captain Boomer installation7Captain Boomer installation1 Captain Boomer installation2

It would probably be prudent to begin by letting you know this whale is not real.  Rather, the whale is a highly-detailed site-specific installation and the “scientists are actors organized and created by a Belgian collective known as Captain Boomer.  The installation was on the banks of the river Thames and in conjunction with Greenwich + Docklands International Festival – an outdoor festival.  The installation (which pops up on various river banks throughout Europe) stir up and disrupt entire communities just as real beached whales do.  The collective sets out to educate communities on whale the beaching of whales and the larger issues tying humans to nature.  Regarding viewers’ unique reaction to their installation, Captain Boomer describes:

“During our beachings, we see an intensive interaction among the crowd. People address each other, speculate and wonder. They offer help and ask for information. The different layers of perception create funny games. Some audience members know it is a work of art but feed the illusion to other people.”

Josh Dorman

Whisper (all images via Mary Ryan Gallery)

Whisper (all images via Mary Ryan Gallery)

Josh Dorman paints on old topographical survey maps, tinted with age and layered with meticulously arranged shapes and images, colors flowing within and outside of existing contours, combining histories and facets of the past to embrace a dream that is reflective and inquisitive of the real world. His current show at Mary Ryan gallery was a refreshing reminder of my great enthusiasm for all things collage, especially if it invokes looking at and thinking about the world with fantasy inducing stories while incorporating an undercurrent of criticism, passive yet incisive questioning, and a loss of order or norm.