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Rubbish Fairy: Berlin Junk Artist Turns Discarded Trash Into Kitschy Costumes And Masks

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Junk artist Rubbish Fairy (Sophie Soni) is constantly hoarding, collecting, cutting, gluing and arranging, yeap you guessed it, rubbish. She manages to take discarded plastic bits and pieces and turns them into wearable, kitschy, technicolor rainbow explosions. Soni fashions together chunky head pieces, masks, breastplates, dresses for different performers, musicians, artists, and fashion shoots. Basically anything that can adorn the body, she has it covered. Her pieces include stunningly ornate chandelier head dresses, or Victorian-style flouncy dresses littered with cheap and cheerful gems, or balaclava masks covered with red silicon lips, pig noses and multiple strings of beads. She has even chopped up soft toys in the past and used their various limbs and heads as different bits of jewelry.

Ms Fairy piles everything on all at once and manages to bask in the chaos she creates. As a comment on consumer culture, vanity, the fashion industry, and the economy of desire, her work is reminiscent of installation artist Mike Kelley. Both manage to exist simultaneously within and outside of pop culture. They heavily reference, and use the resources from the world around them, yet manage to place themselves in an order separate from it.

Rubbish Fairy’s world is a surreal, captivating, all encompassing one – where, if you’ve been in it for long enough, you will start to see the trash around you quite differently. See more of her out-of-this-world creations after the jump.

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Mel Kadel

Mel Kadel

Mel Kadel is originally from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and graduated from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia. She now resides in Los Angeles (and represented by Richard Heller Gallery), in a log cabin by the 5 freeway. She works using ancient papers, tiny pens, Q-tips and glue.

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Phil Ashcroft

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London based artist Phil Ashcroft explores & investigates the Urban Landscape and unveils, through both 2D & 3D mediums, sometimes somewhat ominous and often playful, the hidden possibilities within.

A Warped House from Martine Feipel and Jean Bechameil

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This installation of Martine Feipel and Jean Bechameil is as much about the structure as the empty space within it.  The installation’s title Le Cercle Fermé, or the Closed Circle, offers a clue.  Like a closed circle Feipel and Bechameil offer a finite space that in some ways look familiar, much like a home.  However, the artists playfully alter the structure and its furnishings to throw viewers off balance.  The warped rooms make visitors acutely aware of the space and how they interact with it.  In a way this calls to mind more benign spaces like bedrooms or kitchens, and encourages us to consider how such familiar spaces influence daily life. [via]

Patrick Tsai’s Modern Times In China

Ever see something bizarre during your daily routine? It may make you laugh, cry, or make you scratch your head. Later in the day you try to tell friends about what you saw but somehow something gets lost in the translation.  Patrick Tsai’s Modern Times series manages to capture those very moments for all of us to enjoy.

Words Leap Off The Page In 3D Calligraphy Art By Tolga Girgin

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Considerably ancient art form of calligraphy is brought to new dimensions by Tolga Girgin, a Turkish electrical engineer by trade and graphic designer by heart. His series of 3D calligraphic artworks witness how a little bit of imagination and skill can breathe life to a slowly disappearing craft.

Looking at Girgin’s graceful letters and strokes it seems like they are going to leap off the page and float into thin air. The eye-catching effect is achieved by combining skillful shading and perspective. Bright colors also do justice for Girgin’s works. His letterforms look more like paper cut-outs than two-dimensional drawings.

Girgin also practices “calligraffiti” which blends the properties of calligraphic style with modern day graffiti: the art of writing meets the art of getting your (pseudo) name up in an urban environment. Calligraffiti borrows inspiration from ancient lettering styles: Japanese ancient brush characters, Arabic pictorial scripts, medieval books and quill writing. The new form of art was originally named and pioneered by Dutch artist Niels Shoe Meulman. (via Colossal)

Diary Of A Madman…. Kyle Thomas

Three months ago we approached long time B/D contributor Kyle Thomas to hand draw every single copy (1,500 total) of Beautiful/Decay’s Book: 1. Much to our surprise, Kyle quickly agreed and simply said “Bring it on!”

Last night at 6pm, we received the shipment of books and Kyle began the monumental task of creating 1,500 distinct works of art. The video above documents his stream of conscious supernatural drawing style. He’s currently holed up in the Beautiful/Decay offices drawing non stop during the whole work day! Based on his current pace he will complete all the covers by Tuesday July 14th, which is also the cut off date to reserve your copy. So make sure to subscribe today to ensure you get a copy of this one of a kind book.