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Pedestrians Create Leaves On Trees By Walking Across Large Canvases On The Street

 

Cool project from the DDB China Group for the China Environmental Protection Foundation:

We decided to leverage a busy pedestrian crossing; a place where both pedestrians and drivers meet. We lay a giant canvas of 12.6 meters long by 7 meters wide on the ground, covering the pedestrian crossing with a large leafless tree. Placed on either side of the road beneath the traffic lights, were sponge cushions soaked in green environmentally friendly washable and quick dry paint. As pedestrians walked towards the crossing, they would step onto the green sponge and as they walked, the soles of their feet would make foot imprints onto the tree on the ground. Each green footprint added to the canvas like leaves growing on a bare tree, which made people feel that by walking they could create a greener environment.

It’s nice to see a project that gets the public completely involved without sacrificing any quality control. See some detail images after the jump. (via)

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Viktor Hachmang

 

Viktor Hachmang is a designer and illustrator based in The Hague, The Netherlands. Though visually influenced by ’60s psychedelic posters and ’80s postmodern design, he takes his inspiration from a wide variety of sources and his work often alludes to famous artists and artworks. Central to his work is the illustrative imagery which focuses strongly on decorative details. The concept of collage is also apparent, as his portfolio is a deliberate hodgepodge of various eras in art history and different ways of image making. Hachmang combinines the banal and the beautiful in one image, often mixing intellectual and naive imagery of strict geometry with hand drawn forms. He also co-edits the blog theeyestheysee, an ongoing collection of artists, artworks and other sources of inspiration.

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Per Johansen’s Grotesque Photographs Of Meat Stuffed Into Bottles

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For the photographer Per Johansen’s new series, the artist shoots plastic bottles filled and overflowing with raw and bloody meat, exploring human consumption and calling into question the ethics of the meat industry. The project, titled Mæt (meaning Full) uses recycled plastic bottles to stand in for the human stomach and appetite; each is then stuffed with chicken, eel, sausage, liver, fish. When viewing this disturbing and probative project, viewers are forced too to consider the morality of using a once-living being in art; if the work makes a statement against cruel techniques in meat production, is it then exempt from the same ethical criticism?

Shot under expert lighting to reveal the textures of the dead flesh, each image reads like a scientific specimen, an objective and disturbing archive of meat production. The stomach-turning images are hard to look at; like organisms preserved in jars and formaldehyde, the meat products look less like food and more like grotesque captives. Their biological beauty is expressed through the ridges of a snail shell; a compressed cephalopod fleshes emerald hues, and the shiny metallic glint of scales presses against the cruel plastic. A pair of eel eyes appear deadened, and an eel mouth seems to open in a silent scream, a head thrust from the bottle neck.

Here, the human appetite for meat is shown as wasteful, the stomach equated with the plastic bottle, an object associated with careless consumption. The work’s website asks viewers, “Are you full now?” This idea brings us back to our initial question: is it humane to use meat for creative purposes, or is it degrading and wrong to use once-living organisms in such a way? Does the answer change when the work is meant to protest human gluttony and the grotesque nature of mass meat production? Let us know what you think in the comments! (via Feature Shoot)

Short Film “Shiloh” Powerfully Explores Self-Identity Using Dance And Colored Powder

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Shiloh (2014). By Gabriel Moreno.

“Shiloh” is a creative short film that uses dance footage and bursts of colored powder to explore self-identity. Created by Brooklyn-based production company Dreambear with director James Hall, “Shiloh” is a unique and contemporary fusion of dance, film, and visual art. The short narrative begins with dancer Shiloh Hodges crouching and swaying ritualistically in a spotlight. As the music picks up, she rises and moves into a fluid dance while dust falls from her shoulders. With each beautiful flourish she throws colored powder into the air, which is captured in beautiful arcs by the slow motion footage.

“How can we present our identity through art?” the video description asks, seeking to articulate what makes art such a powerful outlet for self-expression (Source). Emerging from Shiloh’s own difficulty in exploring personal identity in the oft-competitive and critical field of dance, the short film wordlessly answers this question; with a powerful self-awareness, her body resists the surrounding darkness as it moves seamlessly with the uplifting music. The rainbow-colored powder she throws evokes a spectrum of emotions, from joy, to love and self-care, to a tinge of sadness. Accenting her skin are beautiful, drawn-on “fractures,” making it appear as though the coloured powder comes from within, symbolizing her internal, heart-based experiences.

Accompanying the short film is a portrait by renowned Madrid-based artist Gabriel Moreno. Moreno became a collaborator on the project when Hall reached out to him and subsequently produced the art piece featured in the film’s final scene. As in the film, depicted in the illustration is an overlay of multiple emotions and experiences; beneath the central portrait are different outlines of Shiloh dancing. As in his other works, Moreno uses bursts of color to dramatically punctuate the illustration. Together, the film and portrait explore self-identity across mediums, immortalizing Shiloh’s beautiful dance as a powerful fruition of creativity, talent, and strength.

Visit Dreambear’s website to see more of their exciting work, as well as their Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Moreno’s work can be followed on his website, Twitter, and Facebook page.

Saira McLaren Is Far Out Maaaannnn…

It’s extremely hard to pull off the old tie dye painting move but Saira Mclaren has managed to do it with these interesting experimental abstractions. If you squint real hard you’ll start seeing figures, buildings, landscapes, and maybe in jesus.

Everyday Gaga

Ever wonder what Lady Gaga would be doing if she was just a quirky fashionista and not a wealthy celebrity? Designer Denise Kuan did and thus Everyday Gaga was born. Now for the first time ever you can see Denise channel the spirit of Lady Gaga so we can see the new queen of pop shave her pits, bake cookies, clean a toilet, and blow up air mattresses.

When I meet celebrities and they’re in casual clothes, I’m always like: ‘Whaaat?’ I don’t mean to be judgmental, but it would do them better to be who they really are, all the time. This is really who I am all the time. When I get out of a car and there are 30 fans waiting for me, I know I’m dressed the way I should be. There’s a reason they have that emotional reaction.– Lady GaGa, 3/31/2010

Zadok Ben David’s Metal Figurative Sculptures Look As If They Are Made Of Intricate Lace

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Sculptures looking like lace drawings floating in the air. Zadok Ben David, an Israeli artist based in London is using metal to create magic and illusion. A personal mean he chooses to connect culture and innovation.

From far, the sculptures seem indistinct, projecting only a large silhouette. Up close, we are able to discern the intricate details that form the shape. Zadok Ben David laser cuts the  metal to generate the irregular patterns covering the surface. The pieces should not be visualized from one angle. By circling around the pieces we uncover the hidden feature: the flatness of the sculptures. The artist is playing with volumes, going from 2 dimensional to a make belief 3 dimensional structure.

Zadok Ben David depicts human bodies in unusual postures. The individuals seem to be in the middle of an inner contemplation and the artist have caught them by surprise. He is rendering spontaneous moments and delivering them to us. The artist’s meaning behind the figurative sculptures is to question humankind’s place in the world. This notion of presence is channeled by the representation of the botanical inspired motifs, the airy silhouettes and the harmonious combination of it all.

Mark Mulroney and Charles Linder

Always psyched to see some new Mark Mulroney jams! Haven’t exactly heard of Charles Linder, but I must say, that installation is looking wild. Here’s a taste of both artists most recent exhibition endeavor, more after the jump…