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Tyler Orehek’s Collaborates With His Five Year Old Son To Create Vintage Photographs

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Tyler Orehek’s photographic interest lies in vintage-style photography, which he creates with his young son, also Tyler, as the subject of his portraits. Each scene is meticulously planned as Orehek selects the environment and props beside which he casts his son. It’s really enjoyable to see his son inhabit each character, and he does it well. Tyler looks like a shrunken man from the 1900s on, as a bookie, a boxer, a police officer, and more. It’s obvious that Orehek has done his research.

Orehek speaks about his love of vintage photography, and his reasoning for his approach in his artist statement:

My intent was not and is not to replicate existing vintage photographs but to capture the mood, feel and the visceral emotion of that period. Having a child in lieu of an adult in my work allows the viewer to focus on the “essence” of those past environments and professions with greater clarity through juxtaposition.

He’s right on that by including Tyler instead of a full-grown man, the scene seems fresher. The images are drenched in nostalgia, but they seem living because of the naïve air of his son, who is really making the part his own, while trying to emulate the moods his father strives for.

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Julie Heffernan

Julie Heffernan‘s paintings take all the tropes of Northern Renaissance painting, combines them, and makes them into absurd works that feel like art history collages rendered by one of the masters themselves. She has a show coming up at the Mark Moore Gallery on November 3, so if you like what you see, make sure to check out her opening, it sounds great!

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David Mascha

David Mascha’s got some great typography and digital illustration work on his portfolio site.

Joe Porter

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UK graphic designer Joe Porter has a refreshing style. A combination of minimal color and collage inspired design makes his work eye catching. This young new designer is a recent graduate from Brighton University. He has already been featured in several publications i.e. Computer Arts and Wallpaper Magazine. Not too bad for this up incoming designer.

Baker’s Dozen Opening @ Torrance Art Museum Sat.

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Eric Yahnker

The exhibition “Baker’s Dozen” will be opening this Saturday, Sept. 19 at the Torrance Art Museum. The show is a really great survey of some of Los Angeles’s  best & brightest contemporary artists- if you haven’t seen the works by the artists exhibiting here yet, you no doubt will soon–many of them have been making some waves around the So Cal art scene for a while. Don’t miss this show if you’re in the area! To give you a taste, I’ve included (no pun intended based in any way off the image above) selected works by my personal faves after the jump including Allison Schulnik, Tia Pulitzer, Jared Pankin, Aragna Ker and Mark Dutcher. The brilliant Eric Yahnker featured above. For the other half of the baker’s dozen, you’ll just have to check out the show yourself!

SHINJI OHMAKI’S INTERACTIVE FLORAL Floors

 Shinji Ohmaki’s interactive floor installations are composed of traditional floral patterns made out of food coloring, laid on the floor for viewers to walk over, destroying it as they do so.
This work transformed with the passage of time, and the space too was reborn through this process.

Whimsical Animals Sculpted From Dreams By Wang Ruilin Carry The World On Their Back

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Beijing artist Wang Ruilin dreams of animal/nature hybrids, surreal and beautiful, influenced by fine art techniques and aesthetics. In his ongoing series, “Pursuit of Dreams,” these unreal images come to life as large copper sculptures.

Some of the animals carry landscapes: cloud lined mountains rest on deer-like antlers; a relief map spreads across the back of a yak; the backs of a crocodile and a whale hold mountain ranges. In Ark, another whale serves as vessel, holding an ocean and icebergs on its back. The play of scale in familiar forms makes these sculptures somewhat whimsical, despite their literal interpretation. The integration of living creature with land mass and body of water lends an added dimension to the idea of “nature.”

“The Ark series is the result of my most recent efforts. Infused with my true feelings and emotions, they send the message that life sustains nature. As I grew older with more life experience, I started to doubt what I used to learn. These works are the denial of our current world and a depiction of an ideal one. I oppose the self-centeredness of human beings and the ruthless exploitation of other species and natural resources. I seek harmony with the nature. Nature’s greatness lies in her inclusion of everything on earth, while man’s greatness lies in his perception of his own smallness.”

Some of the “Pursuit of Dreams” sculptures are more streamlined versions of actual animals. With their smooth surfaces and self-contained air, the Horse, Rhino and Bird sculptures reveal Ruilin’s life-long interest in animals. His art influences are also long-standing:

“Eastern classical art also gives me inspiration. I like deep and pure Chinese flowers and bright and cool verdigris with rich colors and full of profoundness and uniqueness.”

(via This is Colossal)

Spencer Kovats Reveals the Impressive And Extensive Tattoos That We Hide

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Do you know someone who, beneath their clothes, has extensive tattoos? They might look unassuming from the outside, but underneath reveals their impressive collection of body art. That’s the idea behind Vancouver-based photographer Spencer Kovats’ series Uncovered, in which he invites strangers to pose in two photos- one where they appear fully-clothed and the other where we see their ink in all its glory.

The subjects have colorful, full sleeves and backs of intricate designs that showcase the art of tattooing. There is an interesting juxtaposition between the two photos, as someone sheds their skin to who they really are. They look more relaxed and at ease. At the same time, it also challenges us to think about how we judge people and how this changes after we see stripped down.

Kovats is one of 11 photographers participating in the “The Tattoo Project” that began during a long weekend 2010. Hundreds of tattooed people journeyed to shared studio space to pose before the cameras. The photographers captured thousands of portraits that each explored different aspects of body art. (Via Huffington Post)