Get Social:

Merijn Hos’ Quirky Sculptures

Merijn Hos lives and works in Utrecht, the Netherlands. When he isn’t working on an illustration project he creates drawings and paintings that showcase a multitude of idiosyncratic characters and objects. In a new body of work Hos constructs lively sculptural works out of wood and paint. The simplicity of the materials adds an accessibility to his signature quirks.

Advertise here !!!

Petros Chrisostomou’s Photographs Trick Your Sense Of Scale

Chrisostomou, Photography

Chrisostomou, Photography

Chrisostomou, Photography

Petros Chrisostomou, a New York based photographer, plays with scale, mass-produced and ephemeral objects, and hand-crafted mini architectural models in order to challenge the viewer’s visual certainties, and visual signifiers of contemporary mass culture.

The multi-faceted works resemble lively assemblages of what seem to be large-scaled mundane objects in exaggerated interiors – some resembling wreckage, and others referencing the extravagance of a Rococo palace.

Christosomou’s photographs become the field for mixing the high- and the low-brow, mass culture and genre painting, the luxurious and the expendable, as indications of social class distinctions. At the same time, the relations between the real and the imaginary in his oeuvre are a commentary on the mediated images of contemporary mass media that distort the natural and immediate dimension of our relation to reality, determining, among other things, the conditions for viewing and receiving art. 

The relevance of this body of work does not completely rely on its technical complexities, and cultural commentary, but also in its visual power. We know that the artist is not fabricating monumental sculptures resembling stiletto shoes, instead he is fabricating small-scaled architectural spaces- that play out with the objects, making them look bigger than they seem. It is important to notice, as curator Tina Pandi points out that “the alteration of scale and reversal of the relation between object and environment, between imaginary and real space.”

(Photos via Ignat Quotes via Artist’s Website)

Advertise here !!!

The Everyday Lives of “Furries” Photographed by Tom Broadbent

At Home With The Furries

Unknown-12

Unknown-10

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Sophie Chapman-Andrews’ article on Tom Broadbent.

Zuki, a Gargoyle at home. Zuki lives in Milton Keynes and works in IT. Zuki owns a few suits, the gargoyle is just one of them.

First rule of Fur Club: don’t reveal your identity. Second rule of Fur Club: don’t talk to journalists.

British photographer Tom Broadbent has been getting to know various “Furries” throughout the UK for the last few years. Furries are everyday people, from bank managers to project managers to actors, who dress up in elaborate furry animal costumes and meet up to chat and hang out. Furry groups have been spotted walking around London’s St. Paul’s Cathedral and Millennium Bridge.

At Home With the Furries is Broadbent’s ongoing project, born from a desire to capture the personal, everyday side of their lives without breaking that first Furry rule. Broadbent plans to exhibit and publish this unique series, so keep an eye out for that.

William Lamson

Picture 11

I know. Anyone can string banana-hostages to a perfectly innocent tree; the gesture is simple enough, but who ever would’ve thought to do this? The playfulness, exuberance and creativity in William Lamson’s little “interventions” make you reconsider space, how we interact with it, and how we see the world. I just imagine attempting to climb to the top of these slippery slapstick yellow rungs only to discover what I’m dealing with is not a playstructure tree but…bananas. And if that’s not enough, check out the vid after the jump that shows the artist in a Hell-raiser style mask, made entirely of bananas with dynamite wicks on the end. One by one he lights them, causing them to explode in Chiquita’s ultimate pimple/fruit popping extravaganza.

Ahn Jun’s Photography at Dizzying Heights

The photographic images of artist Ahn Jun unfold at dizzying heights.  Ahn captures her self-portraits perched atop ledges and windowsills.  The frightening heights don’t act as a gimmick it does in the current Russian fad that may come to mind.  Rather, Ahn uses the elevation more as a narrative tool.  While clearly referencing suicide, she pushes the story beyond that also.  She nearly seems not only to be involved in an inner drama but interacting with the cityscape as a whole – she looks as if to be addressing the city personally.

Rachel Graves Transforms Catcalls And Harassment Into Powerful Photo Series

o-BIRD-900 o-BIRD-900-2bitch

bitch-2

In a powerful series by artist and curator Rachel Graves, she interprets the catcalls and street harassment that’s thrown at her and her friends when in public places. Menagerie is a collection of self portraits that liken this lewd and unwanted treatment to the way that animals are prey.

“The project came about as a way for me to take control of what was happening and find a way to answer back and gain ownership over myself again,” Graves explained to The Huffington Post. “For me it was important to do more than simply dress up and paint my face to represent some of the names and insults being thrown at me. I didn’t want to just turn myself into the object that the harassers saw me as. I wanted to find a way to get my sense of self back, to be able to throw the words away and take back control.”

 “Bird,” “fox,” and “bitch,” are all references to animals (and ones that women are called) that dehumanize people, and are all costumes that Graves wears. She paints ghoulish-looking makeup and fashions snouts that reflect the identity of what she is to her taunters. Afterwards, she washes herself of these oppressive masks.

“Being a woman in a public space can be a scary thing. Some men perceive women’s bodies as being public property, and act in ways that are intimidating and sexually aggressive. When I experience street harassment, my autonomy and control over my own body is taken away from me,” Graves says, again to The Huffington Post. “A similar thing can be seen in the industrialization of farming practices. Animals and women are objectified in similar ways: seen merely as pieces of meat for public consumption.”

By washing away the paint and taking off the noses, Graves regains her own identity. (via The Huffington Post)

Bang! Bang! Studio and the Weather

Bang! Bang! Studio, based in Russia, collaborated with IT company Yandex to create an interactive weather application for the iPad. Utilizing the studio’s rich variety of illustrations, 70 works are animated to keep your daily check of the weather fresh. Best part? App is totally FREE and available in Russian and English. Reviews suggest the size of the app makes it a bit slow, but the pictures are still nice to look at, and I like the idea of adding some art to a daily activity without losing functionality.

Anne Hardy’s Fabricated Time And Space

Anne Hardy photographs fantastical spaces where only the residue of mysterious happenings remain. These spaces are are meticulously staged with everything from the walls to small radio knobs completely created by the artist only to be photographed and then immediately destroyed. All that is left is the mystifying documentation that acts as a relic of a time and place where something once took place. (via vvork)