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Kate MacDowell

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According to Kate MacDowell, her varied travels from Italy to rural India have greatly influenced her unique artistic vocabulary. She began studying ceramics full-time in 2004. Since then, she has created pieces that ascertain their prestige through the perfect juxtaposition of the beautiful and the alarming. MacDowell’s work is so precise that it feels as if it exists more comfortably in reality than in imagination. If you’re in the UK, you can see her work in the upcoming group show, Shadowside, at bo.lee Gallery in Bath.

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Hellenism And Space Invaders From Oliver Payne

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Oliver Payne‘s collages present many juxtapositions: East and West, new and old, digital  and analog.  In an interesting way, though, the images of Japanese Bullet Hell Games and photographs of classical European sculpture compliment one another.  A tradition of fantastic stories and violence are present in each.  Further, the gallery statement mentions that the “Greek statues serve as a background and a reminder of the fantasy worlds produced in Japanese arcade games, which often picture rural Europe.”  While exhibited, the collages are joined by the raucous soundtrack of the noises of a traditional arcade flowing through the gallery.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: TV On The Radio- Will Do

Love this sci-fi, trippy, lovey dovey, video for TV On The Radio’s Will Do single. Directed by Dugan O’Neal.

Drew Mosley Three-Dimensional Forest Critters Come Alive In Layers Of Resin

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Drew Mosley - Mixed Media

Canadian artist Drew Mosley paints vivid scenes of anthropomorphic animals on layers and layers of resin. Being an artist and a carpenter, his work contains layers of resin that sit inside custom made wooden frames. Being surrounded by incredible nature in his hometown of Ontario, he draws inspiration from the breathtaking beauty of the wild. The little forest creatures he depicts in his artwork are no doubt animals that he has come across on hikes or in daily life. Drew Mosley’s furry friends look like characters from a storybook, with lots of personality and quirky qualities. Although the critters are wild, they act somewhat like humans by carrying objects such as traveling packs and flags.

Drew Mosley creates in depth atmospheres by painting on individual layers of resin. Each animal almost seems to be popping out of its lush habitat, appearing three-dimensional. Even the feathers of the owl seem to be standing straight up, creating a very real sense of volume and shape. By using this technique, the artist renders extremely realistic textures of fur, feathers, twigs, and leaves. Many of his dioramas include found objects that sit right in the resin, jutting out from the piece. In Mosley’s work titled The Egg Thief, a real quail egg is included in the composition, making the entire piece look all the more realistic. The artist also being a carpenter, he creates sculptures and installations of his wild critters. (via Colossal)

Paul Yore’s Dazzling Tapestry Cheerfully Welcome Us To Hell

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Australian artist Paul Yore uses colorful applique, sequins, weaving, and more to depict a world that seems cheerful, but is the opposite of sunshine and rainbows. Instead, Yore’s materials tell us that things are much worse. In one work, he welcomes us to hell. Vibrant hearts and yellow smiley faces still opposite to skulls and erect penises in these tapestry wall hangings.

Upon initial glance, your eyes are drawn to all the colors under the rainbows. It feels jubilant and even innocent. But, as soon as you start to study Yore’s work, you see that these choices are his form of biting commentary on political and social issues. Often, leaders will try and sugarcoat serious issues, to be dismissive of victims or even blame them. The artist exposes this type of hypocrisy (and more) by putting it all out in the open so that you can’t look away.

The dazzling satire is at times overwhelming, as if the artist has so much to say that he wants to fit it within one dizzying piece. Here, it’s akin to the epic paintings Hieronymous Bosch in terms of of a compositional frenzy. Where you look for a long time, finding new small moments every time that you look. (Via Collection Department)