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Gregor Gaida’s Powerful Sculptures Depict Humans And Animals In States Of Violence And Vulnerability

Der Dornenauszieher (2013). Acrylic resin, acrylic glass, wood.

Der Dornenauszieher (2013). Acrylic resin, acrylic glass, wood.

Attaboys (Edition of 3 + 1 AP) (2012). Aluminium.

Attaboys (Edition of 3 + 1 AP) (2012). Aluminium.

Attaboys (Edition of 3 + 1 AP) (2012). Aluminium.

Attaboys (Edition of 3 + 1 AP) (2012). Aluminium.

Polygonal Horse (2011). Wood.

Polygonal Horse (2011). Wood.

Gregor Gaida is an artist based in Bremen, Germany, who is known for his sculptures of earth-shattering and bone-breaking power. Aggression, pain, and vulnerability permeate throughout his works as humans and animals engage in mysterious battles, writhe in torment, and stagger alone into defeat. “Attaboys” (2012), for example, features two hooded boys carving a deep line into the surrounding brick, as if marking territory; “Swog” (2013) displays two alien-like, fanged mouths locked together in a violent dual of equal power; “Canis Major III-I” (2014) shows a wounded dog lying on its side, its hind legs dismembered and sides cracked open. In these scenes of violence and passion, Gaida provides a complete story: each sculpture figuratively embodies a driving force, a moment of passion, the falling action, and the pain left behind.

As discussed in this article by Colossal, Gaida derives his figures from book and magazine imagery:

“The found footage is often no more than an impulse that is no longer discernible in the further development of the shape. Analogous to photography, my objects are three-dimensional snapshots. The characters are frozen in movement and often cropped along imaginary image borders. I transport the fragmented character of photos into the third dimension. Simultaneously, when dealing with color and options of shaping, painterly characteristics appear. Thus, the life-sized special interventions are formally attributed to sculpture but are equally part of painterly and photographic categories.” (Source)

These “fragmented” characters that Gaida adapts from print media have a strangely mythological-yet-contemporary appearance. Shattered, tortured torsos are reminiscent of the stone busts of Greek and Roman antiquity (see “Rest von Schwarz”); in “Polygonal Dog,” a Cerberus-type creature has been reimagined as a horrific laboratory mutant, five heads gnashing together instead of three. The multiplicity and fragmentation, however, is what lends Gaida’s sculptural “collages” a sense of power and beauty; they are grotesque and frightening, but look beyond the rage and wounds and there lies vulnerability, strength, and survival.

Visit Gaida’s website to view more of his spectacular work.

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David Altmejd

David Altmejd’s sculptural works anatomically analyze and digitally disect organic forms to create hauntingly recontextualized works that evoke human form in strange new ways. In their altered states, they are at once strangely familiar and aversive. Like mythological humanimal creations such as the werewolf or Frankenstein, Altmejd’s creatures wondrously hobble to life with a magic all their own. Altmejd is represented in New York City by Andrea Rosen GalleryXavier Hufkens, Brussels and Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London.

 

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Made With Color Presents: Kent Michael Smith’s Paintings Of Ambiguous Representation

Kent Michael Smith Painting

Kent Michael Smith Painting

Kent Michael Smith Painting

This week we’re bringing you another talented artist as part of our partnership with premiere website building platform Made With Color. Each week we bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who are using Made With Color to create clean and sleek websites. Made With Color sites aren’t just easy on the eyes but feature powerful yet simple backend which allows anyone to create a professional site with just a few clicks.This week we are excited to share the layered and resin coated paintings of Kansas based painter Kent Michael Smith.

Composed of hovering masses of suspended geometric forms which produce both faux and literal shadows onto each other as well as onto the autonomous backgrounds; Kent Michael Smith’s paintings thrive within a realm of ambiguous representation. Likewise, the productions of the works are of equal conflict. On one hand they attempt to prescribe to a historical notion of painting that utilizes rendering properties of tinting and tone, while simultaneously producing a colored flatness of cut-paper collage…all floating on top of an often organic background.

Clearly, a conflict is at play.

The tonal nature of the conflict that is taking place within these paintings, is similar to the territorial passion that community members display when something moves into their neighborhood that is seemingly unsavory, or unwelcome. Whether the new entity produces an end result that is of catastrophic Armageddon-like consequences, or somehow complementary to the ubiquitous status quo; it makes no difference. While it isn’t difficult to imagine these progressively intruding forms as symbols of development and urban sprawl, Smith’s desire is for the implied conflict to be the first, and lasting, impression.

Derek Aylward

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I am in love with Derek Aylward’s use of mixed media and flat renderings that create these amazingly haunting images that are just congested with expression and mood.

John Von Bergen’s Penetrates The Gallery

I’m loving these massive installations by John Von Bergen. It’s as if the building has all of a sudden come alive.

Jess de Wahls Uses Recycled Fabric In Colorful Portraits Of Inspirational Women

Chimamanda Ngozy Adichi

Chimamanda Ngozy Adichi

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo (detail)

Dr. Ronx

Dr. Ronx

Jess de Wahls is a London-based artist whose colorful multilayered and multifaceted textile works incorporate feminism, gender equality as well as recycling. Using a variety of fabrics, beads, and other materials, she creates 3D portraits that depict strong, inspirational women of all ages, shapes, and ethnicities. She sees her pieces as a way to raise awareness of gender inequality, explaining to TextileArtist.org, “…all the while celebrating great minds and artists of the past and present.

In her artist statement, de Wahls also goes on to say:

Their influence on myself as a modern woman, Feminist and Artist, on Feminism as a whole and on their position as Role models to young girls growing up in a society that has, no doubt, come a long way in liberating its women but has yet a great length ahead of it. Not to mention the work that needs to be done in other parts of our planet, where women are to date still oppressed, belittled and generally treated as second class humans.

So, by creating these pieces, she ensures that their legacy isn’t forgotten.

De Wahls unique style is the product of a self-made called Retex which is short for recycled textile sculpture. She explains:

For the medium of Retex Sculpting, old garments serve as fabric for the works and cushion filler  helps me to create a relief that raises the silhouette off the canvas creating greater depth.
The box-frame, in which the work is mounted, is integral to the piece and can be seen as a modern day relic box. (Via TextileArtist.org)

Sean Anderson

 

Sean Anderson is a painter based out of Santa Barbara, CA. The jungle is a reoccurring theme in his work, and connects to his past experience of being an artist in residence in Bolivia for two years. He plays with novel color relationships and combines non-traditional media, such as spray paint and florescent enamel alongside oil on canvas. Bold and vivid, with their dilapidated houses fixed in florescent hues, the paintings often appear lit as if by nuclear blast.

His jungle paintings sometimes demonstrate an interest in commercial art and advertising, taking direct influence from pop artist Ed Ruscha by combining landscape and text to bring new meaning to ordinary or nonsensical phrases.

In addition to his work as a painter, Sean is co-curator of the Anderson Art Collective and works alongside his brothers (also artists), Benjamin and Ron Anderson. He has an upcoming show at Firehouse30 gallery in Walla Walla, WA. 

What Do Curators Want?

A great series of podcasts by Side Street Projects with various Los Angeles based dealers and museum curators discussing what they look for in art. Some of my favorite interviews include Aimee Chang from the Hammer Museum, and Jeff Poe from Blum&Poe. It’s a great insiders look into not only the LA art scene but into the minds of some of the cities best curators.