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Troy Moth


Troy Moth was born in a remote tree-planting camp on the west coast of Canada and spent the first few years of life in a tent guarded by large dogs. He loved the wild and abundant nature he grew up immersed in, but eventually the call to adventure became too much and he moved, first across Canada to the big city (Toronto), then across the world to India, to pursue a career in photography.

Troy has worked for numerous commercial and editorial clients, including Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Rolling Stone, GQ and many others. But he’s never forgotten his roots, so with a career in fashion now behind him, he’s focusing instead on his art, and living, once again, deep in a forest on the west coast of Canada.

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Drawings by Alfred Steiner.

“Alfred Steiner, part intellectual draftsman, part pop culture surgeon. His works on hot press paper consisted of characters and scenes from the popular to the ambitious—Shaggy and Fred from Scooby Doo!, the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, Saint Anthony—all composed of jutting, blood-tipped bones and glistening, sinewy muscle. Profiles were assembled not with soft lines but with femurs, horses galloped not with hooves but on bare bone and demons brandished swords of muscle over prostrate outlines of pus and blood. Steiner creates a disorienting, dreamy and disturbingly beautiful feast for the eyes, calling to mind large masterworks of surgeons operating in an amphitheater, though one believes it is Steiner whose work operates on us, rather than vice versa. By creating instantly recognizable outlines from the most vital and basic parts of human anatomy, Steiner forces us to look at the culture around us while acknowledging the literal cultures within us.”Sarah Hassan

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Charlotte Dumas’ Unforgettable Photographs Of Mysterious Burial Horses Will Stay With You


At the grave of a fallen soldier stands a pale white horse, regal and majestic, with his mane in tight braids. In Anima, the photographer Charlotte Dumas delves into the quiet moments in the lives of burial horses, known for participating in the funeral ceremonies at Arlington National Cemetery. The magnificent equine creatures— who by day serve as living manifestations of moral ideals, patriotism, and righteousness— are caught by Dumas’s lens in nighttime moments of introspection and rest.

After the flags are folded, after the firearms have rang out, the horses remain in their small box stalls, resting on humble beds of shavings and hay. Shot under Dumas’s gleaming twilight lighting, the animals are pictured in the final minutes before sleep. In stark contrast with the colorful visions of their burial services, they are bathed in a moody Rembrandt-esque glow that streams in from metal bars, seemingly retreating into an unknowable equine psychology.

Yet within these peaceful moments, Dumas captures an anxious sense of unrest. A horse’s glinting black eye remains open as he twists his neck, revealing waves of muscle under short-clipped fur; a long nose, its hair worn away by a bridle’s noseband, pokes out into the light, emerging from sleepy darkness. The neck and back of the creature is fixed in the frame, isolated from the rest of the body, as he goes to stand upright, his withers stained with manure.

The horses range in age: some wear the grey fur of youth, while others are pure flea-bitten white. Seen here, it is as though the horses cannot escape the atmosphere of the cemetery, confined within their dark stalls forever by some invisible knowledge of death. Take a look.



Andreco, negli Italia (that’s Italian for “from Italy”… I hope) recently had a project where he showed videos created from paper-cuts as a live performance “shown in a very old palace in Bologna citycenter, (‘RE ENZO Palace’, the old King Enzo building.),” according to the artist. I love the simplicity and stiffness of the stop motion, and the morbid beauty of the figures.


Adam Lee

Melbourne, Australia based  artist Adam Lee’s paintings draw from a wide range of sources, including historical photography, Biblical narratives, natural history and contemporary music, literature and film, in order to investigate aspects of the human condition in relation to ideas of the spiritual and the natural world.

Photography Spotlight: Paul Paper

paul paper photography

Paul Paper lives in Vilnius, Lithuania where he daydreams, sleeps, walks and sometimes takes pictures. He shoots spontaneously, capturing what he calls “the tiny tiny miracle in boring every day.”

Hate Mail For Hire: Mr Bingo Send Postcards With Nasty Messages To Your Friends

Mr Bingo - hate mail Mr Bingo - hate mail  Mr Bingo - hate mail Mr Bingo - hate mail

Throwing abuse at people is easy. Getting paid to do it is another matter. London based illustrator Mr Bingo does it with ease, and loves taking money for his efforts. The prankster receives offensive sayings from visitors on his twitter page, draws pictures to accompany the words, and sends the composited postcard to the chosen (willing, or unsuspecting) victims. For 50 quid, plus postage, you can receive a customized card that tells you exactly how crap you are. Quite surprisingly, the abusive service he offers has proven to be quite popular. Mr Bingo explains how it all began:

It all started one night in my studio in 2011 when I’d had a few drinks. I went on Twitter and said I will send a postcard with an offensive message to the first person who replies to this. (Source)

After receiving over 50 replies in a matter of minutes, he sent the postcard to ‘winner’ to Jonathan Hopkins from Forest Hill in London, stating that Mr Hopkins had shit legs. “Fuck you, Jonathan, fuck you and fuck your shit legs” the card read. Even though he was saying something that would be offensive, even repulsive to some, Mr Bingo’s card went down a treat and kickstarted a niche market for cards that knocked the receiver’s self confidence.

Essentially, what I was doing was enabling strangers to pay me to tell them to fuck off. All this is comedy. It’s clear that the hate mail is a joke and that I’m only sending it to people who want it. (Source)

Mr Bingo himself receives a lot of hate mail, but takes it all on the chin, as he expects his clients to do. He is the type of person that considers swearing funny, and in fact necessary, but refuses to poke fun at homophobia, racism, religion or disability.  The cheeky illustrator has also launched a (successful) kickstarter campaign to fund a printed collection of his postcards. You can see that project here. (Via Juxtapoz)

Jessica Frelinghuysen

Jessica Frelinghuysens work is concerned with, as she puts it “…creating democratic spaces”. Devises that abet the assimilation (and sometimes alienate) the user in our new civilized constructs. Ponchos to enjoy grass in without having to actually touch grass, and big collapsable paper helmets to tell secrets in are a few concepts that blur the line between genius and funky-freshness.