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Alana Dee Haynes Illustrates Photographed Bodies With Flowing Patterns And Lines

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Alana Dee Haynes is a Brooklyn-based artist who turns the bodies of her photographed subjects into illustrated surfaces, transforming blank skin and clothing into undulating patterns and shapes. We featured some of her works a couple years ago, but since then, Haynes has been continuing to create intricate and whimsical pieces. Peruse the flowing imagery and you will see kneecaps split open into eyes, collarbones overlain with lips, and torsos swarmed with circular, overlapping patterns that transform models into scaled, serpentine creatures. In a fascinating interview with Juxtapoz, Haynes explains how she uses individual physical characteristics to inspire her illustrations, thereby exploring alternative forms of bodily representation:

“Everyone has a certain way they see the world. Some things jump out at people, while others pass them by. I see faces and patterns everywhere. When I look at people, I connect their beauty marks, and find faces in their knuckle lines. It’s just the way I live. So, naturally, I see these things in photographs too. It is not synesthesia, but it is a similar way of viewing multiple layers in things.” (Source)

Fashion also plays a significant role in Haynes’ work. Just as clothes can be creatively worn to signify individuality, her illustrations transform the models’ entire bodies into expressive surfaces. “When it comes down to it, I believe fashion should bring out emotions and be relatable, as if wearing your own skin and mind,” Haynes explained to Juxtapoz. “And my skin is definitely full of faces and patterns” (Source). Whereas the face is so often read as the sole locus of emotional and cognitive display, Haynes’ brilliant line work illuminates the dynamism and individuality that exists everywhere: in our arms, legs, hands, clothing, and more.

Click here to read more of Haynes’ chat with Juxtapoz, and check out her website, Tumblr, and Instagram for more beautiful work. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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David Mendez Alonso’s Parts of a Whole

David Mendez Alonso is a Spanish born artist whose work is out of this world. He separates his elements around the page letting each vignette breathe and forming what I think is a quite explosive finished work. His pieces have a beautiful dialogue.

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Mike Calway-Fagan’s Mixed Media Collage

Mike Calway-Fagan’s collage work mixes dissimilar photography with a sense of urgency. The artist asserts that his works hopes to ‘critique complacency and aestheticise catastrophe’ by creating dis-ordered imagery that evoke disaster. See more after the jump.

kim joon’s Fabricated Porcelain Tattoos

Korean artist Kim Joon fabricates images of fragments of hollow porcelain that resemble nude bodies. Through a painstaking digital process, Kim coats the anthropomorphic forms in bold patterns from ceramic brands such as Villeroy & Boch, Herend, and Royal Copenhagen. What results are deceptively convincing surfaces complete with reflection and shadows.

According to Kim tattoos are not only physical inscriptions on the body but also signifiers of mental impressions left on the consciousness. Alluding to society’s weakness for material objects, Kim’s tattoo imagery reflects our obsessions and deep-seated attachments. The artist’s exploration of tattoos stems from his experiences tattooing his peers while in the Korean military. In his earliest works, Kim grappled with the notion of tattoos as socially taboo in Korean society. He created sculptures that mimicked tattooed portions of flesh. Using water-based markers, he embellished latex-coated sponges, creating anonymous parts divorced from the human form. In recent years, Kim’s work has neatly overturned the negative connotations surrounding tattoos in Korea. In his hands, not only do tattoos reflect social habits and desires but they’re also a vehicle for transforming the body into a highly aestheticized object.

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Book Two Reminder

If you weren’t lucky enough to subscribe to Beautiful Decay in time to get Book One: Supernaturalism, there’s still time to sign up and get our upcoming Book Two! Here’s a sneak peek of what Book Two will feature! But hurry, there’s only two months left to subscribe, so don’t dilly-dally, you don’t want to forget two months from now.

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Stunning Hand Crafted Glass Sculptures Mimic The Magnificent Power And Beauty Of The Sea

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New Zealand artist Ben Young’s most recent work is a series of hand crafted glass sculptures. Upon first glance, it is immediately possible to distinguish the sea as his main source of inspiration. His work consists of a collection of glass sculptures mainly revolving around the theme of water. The colors, patterns, and shapes present within his work are both in color and in form vivid and depict undulating curves and ridges similar to waves.

The sculptures, having been executed on glass emphasize this and work in perfect harmony with the shades of blue, green, and turquoise of the glass which perfectly mimic the colors of the sea. His work represents a fascinating combination of abstract geometrical forms, topography, and even the human body. Through these sculptures, his background as a boat builder and his affinity for surf shine through.

The lines, ridges, and circular shapes in his work give the sculptures additional complexity and detail. The fluidity and translucence of his sculptures add to the beauty and tranquility of his pieces to the extent that one might get lost in them. The way he has managed to transform the glass makes it almost impossible to remember the fact that it is a solid material. The fluidity of his sculptures is truly stunning to the extent that they almost look like they are made up of water, rather than glass.

Josh Spear Likes Our New Site!

Our friends over at Josh Spear have just written up a sweet review of our new site! Click the image above for real, (virtual) proof & to see it in all its cyber glory. Thanks Josh Spear & co!

rabinal

dbp13ts - period 13 attractor by rabinal

Not sure what the process is, or what we’re looking at, but the official response to “….How…?” is: “This is a typical electronic chaotic system. The circuits and block diagram are published elsewhere in this set. It shows a stable “chaotic transient” which at some irregular time (from one run to the next) eventually falls into a trap. It is supposed to indicate what may happen to the planet’s climate patterns in the future, although it is not likely in that case that the trap region will be so regular. In this system the timing of the trapping event is unpredictable.” Flickr user rabinal insists that it’s not art, though…. We beg to differ.