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Oak Thitayarak

Chicago based artist Oak Thitayarak is a graphic designer, illustrator, and photographer; a “jack of all trades” .  He recently created a gritty series of street portraits documenting the homeless.

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Mernet Larsen’s Geometric Narratives

Mernet Larsen’s geometric paintings are at once an affectionate parody and critique of Renaissance narrative painting, a longing for something lost, and a desire for a sense of space and narrative unity more in accord with contemporary concepts of reality.Read her full artist statement after the jump.

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Brandon Jan Blommaert

Experience the geometrically pleasing sensation that is Brandon Jan Blommaert’s gif images. His new collection of moving imagery is not only stunning but hypnotic, too. I just lost 10 minutes of work!

Miguel Vallinas Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals

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Interested in the idea of anthropomorphism, Madrid-based photographer Miguel Vallinas retouched animal photographs and made it appear as though they were wearing human clothes.  Though an initial reaction may be to dismiss Vallinas’ images as something of a cliché, the richness of the photographs combined with the humor have a charm to them that is alluring and endearing.  Segundas Pieles (Secon Skins), is an ongoing project that explores notions beyond anthropomorphism.  In fact, Vallinas’ photographs seem to accurately investigate concepts such as psychology, stereotyping and personality.  The images of the primly dressed swan, or the melancholy donkey portray emotion and narrative beyond simple humor.

Attempting to depict the way he imagined different animals would dress if they had the ability to, Vallinas plays off our preconceived ideas of what our clothing choices signify and what we may, even subconsciously, believe about certain animals, certain people and ourselves.   (via Colossal and dailymail)

Myriam Dion Cuts And Slices Newspapers Into Beautifully Intricate Patterns

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A myriad of cut-out patterns invading a newspaper layout. Myriam Dion creates intricate motifs using a scalpel and newspapers she chooses according to their images. This French-Canadian talented student has already been acclaimed for her work. The art pieces she designs are airy reconstructed poems.

Myriam Dion picks front covers from the Herald Tribune, Le Devoir, Cape Cod Times or FT Weekend and selects images which speaks to her. She then creates negative space by hand cutting minuscule patterns. The entire page is cut-out. Generating a halo of waves and starbursts. The ornaments she designs at the edges and around the original shape of the newspaper mimic Arabic patterns and add fantasy to the layout.

The artist has invented her own organic way of transforming a simple medium into an art piece. By cutting and perforating the thin and fragile papers, Myriam Dion is making the rendering even more delicate than it originally was. The colors, thanks to the placement of the cut-outs, twirl and whirl sporadically on the surface.
The pieces, placed on a white background and revealing the negative spaces are treasures meant to be contemplated and used as a mean for evasion. (Via The Jealous Curator)

Bratislav Milenkovic’s Typographic Illustrations

Serbian designer Bratislav Milenkovic’s imagery sits at the intersection of typography and illustration usually combining the two to create cleaver and playful images. Morre Typography fun after the jump.

Stefan Bleekrode Draws Incredibly Detailed And Dense Cityscapes From Memory

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Based in the Netherlands, artist Stefan Bleekrode creates astonishingly intricate drawings and paintings of landscapes, architecture, and urban environments.  For his Cityscapes series, the artist has rendered unbelievably detailed drawings depicting metropolises both existing and imagined.

Using ink, Bleekrode composes dense and realistic images of buildings, streets, lights, and bridges. With stark tonal contrasts, precise perspective, and a stunning amount of detail, the scenes portrayed in each drawing look almost photographic, as if each one were taken from a bird’s-eye view.

While some of his pieces are set in very distinctive and familiar locations, like London Bridge & the Shard or Broadway and 5th, most possess ambiguous—albeit conceivable—titles, such as Italian City, City in Holland, or City at the Foot of the Mountains. This is because Bleekrode works entirely from memory, describing his completed works “as snapshots of things I’ve seen when traveling or just going through my everyday routine, small bits of beauty in familiar settings.”

Whether representing actual settings or conveying scenes rooted purely in fantasy, the cities depicted in Bleckrode’s elaborate drawings are surprisingly realistic and undeniably impressive.

Karin Waskiewicz’s Carved Abstract paintings

Karin Waskiewicz‘s paintings directly address the physical properties of painting utilizing both conventional and unconventional methods. Waskiewicz’s process beings with acrylic paint applied in thick layers creating a collection of colors to later be unveiled. After the layers are applied, one mark is made. Every mark is a reaction to the shape, placement, and color of the previous marks made. The painting emerges from dry paint as she carves away, excavating the thick surface, intuitively revealing and investigating the depth of the paint, creating a world in paint alone. These paintings reflect formations found in the natural world and the shapes created are both organic and formulated. The repetition of marks connects visually and gives the paintings a vibrational quality and mimic movement. See Karins work in a group show opening April 26th in NYC at Schroeder Romero & Shredder.