Get Social:

The Library Dioramas of Marc Giai-Miniet

Marc Giai- Miniet sculpture3 Marc Giai- Miniet sculpture9Marc Giai- Miniet sculpture4

These aren’t photos of bisected buildings. Rather, they’re the carefully constructed dioramas of artist Marc Giai-Miniet.  His little libraries inhabit multi-storied buildings, perfectly suitable for us bookish nerds.  However, many of his pieces almost seem to be hiding something sinister.  The floors become darker, dirtier, more utilitarian the deeper they are in the building.  Soot stained boiler rooms occupy the basement floors along with objects long forgotten.  Perhaps the entire structure is a metaphor for the mind in a way: the diligent ego among the book lined floors and the unconscious hidden down in the dingy cellar.

Advertise here !!!

Pablo Alfieri – new website!

01

Pablo Alfieri, an artist for BD apparel has revamped his website! Go visit it, there’s a bunch of new work, and it all looks amazing!

http://www.pabloalfieri.com/

Advertise here !!!

50% off All Beautiful/Decay Magazines All Week Long!

To celebrate the short work week we’re putting all our back issues of Beautiful/Decay magazine on sale for the rest of the week! Save 50 percent off all our magazines from now until Thursday May 31st midnight PST. Just use discount code  50magdiscount during checkout and get piles of magazines at a fraction of the cost!

Cedric Laquieze’s Flower Skeletons

 

 

Cedric Laquieze creates incredible creatures out of the odd combination of animal skulls and flowers. The result is gorgeously grotesque and incredibly haunting.

Heeseop Yoon Debris Installations

Heeseop Yoon‘s large-scale installations explore storage and debris — items that occupy space in our lives. Yoon’s method varies between collage and pen, and plays on notions of memory and perception of clutter over time. The finished work doesn’t feel finished as it swells over the space it inhabits, sketched and redrawn, different from every angle and space. 

Matt Hall’s Magical Animal Assemblages

Matt Hall - sculpture

Matt Hall - sculpture

Matt Hall - sculpture

Portland-based artist Matt Hall creates mixed media assemblages and large-scale ink on paper drawings.  He explores the connections between historic perceptions and our sense of wonder with the natural world.  As a child, Hall was fascinated with the ability of birds to fly, fish to breathe underwater and other amazing animal abilities.  Hall’s work incorporates animal parts with other found objects, sketches and notes in an attempt to re-create, analyze, and pay homage to the seemingly magical powers of animals.

There is also a keen interest in death in Hall’s work.  A piece with a snake and a mouse is most obviously about predator and pretty.  The title, however, Mithraicism, refers to the practice of inoculating a person against poison by administering non-lethal amounts.  The piece becomes a metaphor, or sorts, whereby you can’t be immune to death.
As written in Ampersand Gallery’s press release about their last exhibition with Hall, “[his] finely detailed assemblages bring to mind the dioramas & curiosity cabinets of natural history museums, yet on a deeper level they allude to the ritualistic strangeness of reliquaries, thereby serving as an intersection where notions of religion, science, folklore & quackery collide with the artist’s imagination.”  Exquisitely detailed, the animal parts in Hall’s assemblages have been broken and put back together.  Hall uses found road kill as the basis for his works.  Evoking the spiritual practices of animalistic religious whereby interaction with animal parts was thought to transfer magical and totemic powers, Hall is creating both object and mythology.

Baptiste Debombourg Creates A Celestial Installation Made Out Of A Thousand Chairs

Baptiste Debombourg - Installation 10 Baptiste Debombourg - Installation 11

A thousand chairs creating chaos in the middle of a plaza. Baptiste Debombourg is the messenger from the skies. With his installation ‘Stellar’ he transports us above and beyond infinity. A snapshot of a movement, dancing chairs all linked in the air to connect with the public once landed on the ground, is the artist’s vision for this temporary installation.

It took Baptiste Debombourg 1200 chairs, 300 meters of steel tubes and 11 months to set up the installation in the middle of plaza du Bouffay in Nantes, France. Chairs are an important part of the six coffee shops symmetrically facing the plaza, they are the symbol of conviviality. Imitating that concept, he created the installation, structured yet taking us elsewhere, a relaxing place. From each coffeeshops, the sculpture can be perceived from a different angle; creating a different point of view.

Baptiste Debombourg was inspired by the French artist Robert Delaunay’s installation exhibited in 1937 (see the black and white photo far below). The shape’s roundness and exhilarating feeling is reproduced, except the artist chooses to incorporate ordinary materials: chairs that come in six different colors. His purpose is to nourish the eyes, to get a reaction and to defy specific contexts. In many of his installations he is not afraid to deconstruct and recompose, preferring being close to reality and see his work alive.

Baptiste Debombourg’s ‘Stellar’ installation can be viewed at the plaza du Bouffay in Nantes, France until August 2015.

Davis Ayer’s Projections Of Vintage Photographs On Nude Bodies Transcend Time And Memory

Davis Ayer, Time Travel - Photography Davis Ayer, Time Travel - Photography Davis Ayer, Time Travel - Photography Davis Ayer, Time Travel - Photography

Dreams, memories, and bodies melt together in the hazy, surreal work of Los Angeles-based photographer Davis Ayer. We featured his otherworldly landscape and double exposure shots last year, wherein Lindsey Rae Gjording eloquently describes him as a “true nostalgist” whose timeless work “allows the viewer to insert their own subconscious desires into the narrative” (Source). In regards to Ayer’s ability to compress emotion, time, space, and consciousness into his photography, this stunning series, entitled Time Travel, is no exception. Here, Ayer again pulls on the magic and semi-lucidity of dreamworlds, using nude bodies as a projection screen for vintage images; among them, you will see trees, beaches, rushing street lights, and the moon, all mapped onto the surfaces and contours of the nude body, turning skin into a visual narrative, like the one that plays in our heads as we close our eyes to sleep while remembering the past and visualizing our feelings.

What makes this series even more curious for discussion is the idea that the images and memories projected onto the bodies are not the models’ own. Certainly, our bodies are vessels of our own experience, but how much can we embody or touch the past? When we feel nostalgia for the “old days” and vintage culture, what are we missing or mourning? By projecting foreign memories (“foreign,” in that no one’s inner experience can ever be exactly simulated), Time Travel moves the human body — vulnerable, powerful, and honest in its nudity — through time and space, transcending memory and lived experience, and connecting a present lifetime with a past one in moments of intensity and reverie.

Visit Ayer’s website, Tumblr, Facebook page, and Instagram to follow his work.