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Classic Francis Bacon Interview

Even after his death Francis Bacon remains one of the most interesting painters. Above is a two part interview with him from 1966

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Russel Cameron’s Grotesque And Disturbing Sculptures Of Amputated Human Limbs

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Brooklyn based artist Russel Cameron creates lifelike sculptures of amputated human body parts. Displayed almost like trophies, Cameron’s on gong series, Flesh and Bone, acts like a collection of the living bizarre. Using classic materials such as clay, paint, wood, and metal, Cameron, a self taught artist, is able to perfectly achieve the goal of many artists: he attains the ability to accurately mimic human flesh. This handiwork allows his work to truly provoke, probe and disturb; each piece acts as a slight ode to the abnormal, forcing the viewer to imagine the the entire creature attached to the individualized parts. The details are what allow the work to feel so real — his minor hints of flesh tonality and careful placement of wrinkles and creases give enough information to perhaps create a full narrative for every piece. His work is influenced by artists specializing in dark and fantastical subject matter such as Zdzislaw Beksinski, the Polish dystopian surrealist painter, Hieronymus Bosch, the Dutch painter known for his detailed absurd landscapes, and H.R. Giger, the Swiss “biomechanical” surrealist painter and special effects artist known for Alien. He also takes inspiration from classicists such as the infamous Spanish romanic painter Francisco Goya. Through his work, Russel Cameron aims to glorify the beauty in what can be often found as grotesque. 

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Photographic Dreams Of Africa And Space Travel

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Cristina De Middel brings a striking beauty to space travel in her series The Afronauts.  Her series is based on the aspirations of Edward Makuka Nkoloso – a 1960’s Zambian school teacher who wanted to land his countrymen on the moon before the United States or the Soviet Union.  Nkoloso was openly mocked, even by journalists.  Through his story, the series’ pleasant imagery gives way to more serious underpinnings.  De Middel says:

“The images are beautiful and the story is pleasant at a first level, but it is built on the fact that nobody believes that Africa will ever reach the moon. It hides a very subtle critique to our position towards the whole continent and our prejudices.”

Paco Peregrín’s Photography Transforms High Fashion Models Into “Beautiful Monsters”

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Paco Peregrín is an international photographer who creates experimental characters out of high-fashion images. This particular series is entitled Beautiful Monster, which Peregrín directed with the intention of exploring the effect of makeup on identity:

All photos that integrate Beautiful Monster allude to a very particular concept of beauty (sometimes unusual, alien or even beautifully monstrous), to its ephemeral nature and the passage of time. Naked men and women are on a neutral background where makeup comes great prominence, even avoiding the recognition of the models, thus reflecting on the idea of identity and a proposal for the makeup as a contemporary mask that protects us, on the one hand like a camouflage, [and on] the other helping us to build a super-ego. (Source)

Peregrín’s “Monsters” are fascinating, radiating with acid-bright color and cryptic eroticism. Most often nude, their faces are bound and adorned with rope, tape, paint, and jewels. Something happens when their features are obscured — their expressive bodies appear almost inhuman. In a style best described as hyper-real futurism, the images speak directly to a postmodern society so obsessed with beauty and constructed identities that it slips into beautiful absurdity.

Given that fashion photography is often criticized as being wholly commercialized and thus heavily restricted, Peregrín’s unique style is doubly surprising; he has worked with big names such as Chanel, Diesel, Vogue, and Vanity Fair, but still manages to bring his own creative and unconventional vision into his works. Check out his website for a gallery of his immersive and consistently experimental projects. (Via Art Fucks Me)

Felipe Caprestano

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Designer Felipe Caprestano has recently launched himself into a project he titles “Face Couture”,  an experimental project in which he designs, patterns, and sews clothing… for your face! His blog chronicles his creative process, successes, and failures, and there you can watch his ideas grow form concepts into fully functional masks, (if masks can really be said to be functional). Check out this video that summarizes Caprestano’s works!

The Dreamy Sculptures of MyeongBeom Kim

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The sculptures and installations of MyeongBeom Kim are very dreamlike – it makes just enough sense to prevent you questioning it.  Objects transform into other objects, other inexplicably float, and yet others are designed to be entirely useless.  Yet, somehow, it all seems right.  Also like dreams, Kim’s work is playful but not without out a latent sense of anxiety.  A noose, a crutch, an axe suggest a possible dark turn toward realized fears, a nightmare.

Documentary Watch: The Sound Of Transformers

 

I know you’re thinking “Why is Amir doing a post about a mainstream movie like Transformers?” I know I’d be doing the same thing If I logged onto the B/D site and saw this post. Bust stay with me folks because this is actually a very interesting short documentary about how sound designers came up with all the various sounds for the new Transformers: Dark Of The Moon movie. I personally find it inspiring and interesting to see what great lengths these sound magicians go to to find new and unique sounds for our movie watching pleasure. From shooting guns in the desert to recording the sounds of Airforce rockets going off at miles away these guys go to great lengths to create real and intimate experiences for our listening pleasures. Watch the full documentary after the jump!

Garrett Pruter

asylum3Garrett Pruter constructs architecutral wonders with collage and drawing techniques.  He combines graphite and acrylic on top of collage to create mini villages on the page.  I wouldn’t be surprised if there were mini civilizations occupying his turn-of-the-century cityscapes.  He is currently studying Illustration at Parsons School of Design.