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Innovator Guy Ben-Ary Developed An Interactive Synthesizer From His Own Stem Cells

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Inspired by a childhood dream to be a rockstar and fueled by a “narcissistic desire to re-embody” himself, innovator Guy Ben-Ary has developed a synthesizer using his own stem cells. The project, titled “cellF,”  began with what the artist is calling a “new materialist” quandary: Through using both biological and robotic technologies, what sort of responses can one achieve “in regards to shifting perceptions surrounding understandings of ‘life’ and the materiality of the human body?” Or, in other words, how can one explore one’s biological selfhood via means of a technological interface? Or, even further, how can one “clone” oneself into a robotic entity? And, what does that mean for the purpose of the human body?

The machine acts as a “biological self-portrait,” a literal doubling of the artist that is meant to act and behave as Ben-Ary, using his own cells. After receiving the “Creative Australia Fellowship,” Ben-Ary was able to research and develop his project, which he divided in two parts; the first being to grow his own external “brain,” and the second was the development of the robotic interface that would interact with said brain.

To develop the brain, Ben-Ary gathered his cells through a biopsy of his arm. He then used Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell technology (iPS), a method that manipulates cells back into their embryonic state, which would allow him to “reprogram” the cells.

To development of the robotic interface, he created a machine that would serve as a real time feedback loop between itself and the cells. The robotic interface acted as a sound-producing “body” through an analogue synthesizer that is able to reflect “the complexity and quantity of information via sound.” When noise is fed to cellF, the cells then respond using the synthesizer and “perform” live. Pretty cool. (via The Creators Project)

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Erin Mulvehill

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Whispery sweet images from brooklyn-based photographer Erin Mulvehill. She’s also the brains behind “The Camera Project,” a magnanimous exploration into how children perceive their environment. Erin believes that beauty will save the world, and she’s doing her best to help speed up the process.

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Glitz And Pixie Stix- Art Benefit For The Center For The Arts Eagle Rock

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Pop over to Leanna Lin’s Wonderland at 5024 Eagle Rock Blvd. on July 27th from 6-10pm.  On the main gallery wall Leanna Lin’s Wonderland + Rooney Hardwick present Glitz & Pixie Stix “sugar plum dumpling rainbow faces with freckles on top”. 18 artists will be exhibiting whimsical paintings, mixed media art and plush, along with Center for the Arts Eagle Rock (CFAER) student “Clay Jammers” ceramics art! A portion of the art sales will be donated to the CFAER “Imagine Studio”, which is an after school enrichment program bringing arts back into the LAUSD. They currently serve 11 elementary and middle schools in the Northeast Los Angeles.

Peony Yip

What musings I have read by Peony Yip – aka The White Deer – express her true passion for drawing, something she has pursued, as she says, because it is the only thing she knows. The Hong Kong native of only 21 honestly asserts that she is no professional artist, instead describing herself as just a recent college graduate, broke, and looking to freelance a bit. Of course, the young woman can claim what she would like, but I think her talent is undeniable. Amateur or not, I have been loving her varied works. Take a look at some of her creations here, and maybe show this up-and-coming artist a bit of love after the jump.

The Living Landscapes of Siobhan McBride

 

Landscapes are alive in the paintings of Siobhan McBride.  Different locations mesh into a single scene.  Memories and colors delicately surface in the foreground.  McBride’s paintings aren’t so much surreal scenes as they are subtly collaged images in paint.  Speaking of her work McBride says:

“I have come to think of my paintings as views of a place where magic reveals itself differently than it does in this world. The scenes are tense with anticipation or blushing in the aftermath of an unseen event. Paintings combine disparate yet familiar fragments into spaces that are still, anxious, and temperamental.”

Jamie Warren’s Americana Photographs

We posted about Jamie a few years back, but four years have passed since then and she’s only gotten better. Her images about gross, awkward, uncomfortable, and funny moments that would be really easy to make poorly, and a lot of people do. What sets her apart from the herd, though, is her smart, tight framing; focusing us in on exactly what makes this country great–mystery meat, batman, butts, and birthday cake. She even photographs middle America (Jamie’s based out of Kansas City) with the American style that ranges from family to paparazzi photos–bright, garish flash. More Americana after the jump! ( via )

Daniaelle Simonsen

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Artist Daniaelle Simonsen plays with a unique process; this Los Angeles local combines her love of sewing and drawing with the ephemeral material of the magazine to create unique works, delicate yet fierce, that exist as individual art pieces and as usable art. You can also catch up with Daniaelle’s latest news via her blog.

Christopher Bauder’s Interactive Digital Playground Installation

Christopher Bauder

Christopher Bauder

polygon playground from WHITEvoid on Vimeo.

Christopher Bauder‘s Polygon Playgound is a digital heaven .The piece serves as a large scale interactive lounge object, as it offers room for up to 40 people at a time to sit or walk and explore the multifaceted surfaces. Bauder’s interactive piece incorporates 3D surface projections and a sensory system that detects people’s positions and proximity.

The visual appearance of the digital landscape is in constant flux, as the animations on the surface are continuously changing with the constant physical movement and presence of its visitors. For instance, running across the top of the structure may cause the animations to  highlight the participant’s footsteps.The animations are ever changing; some of the motifs that are projected on the piece include: grids, orbs or color that can be ‘kicked’ around, and various abstract color forms. (via Art and Electronic Media)