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Han Bing

han bing theCabbageat_the Mississippi River Bridge2007

Han Bing is an artist living and working in China. Working primarily through photography, with some installation, Bing explores the characteristics of the “modernization” of China. His work is an introduction to the land, the people, and the romanticism of the country. He had previously been featured by us a month or so back in our food art series post by Ms. Makena.

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Liz Craft @ Patrick Painter

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"Candy Colored Clown (Lemon Eye Zig Zag Teeth)"

I never was too good at crafts. The little “easy loom” knit-a-kitten sets always came out looking surprisingly like Liz Craft’s sculpture, above…a mess of plaster-cast, jumbo yarn, pea-pod plastic dishes forming some sort of  goofy-grin. Or at least, I wished they came out like her work. In her recent fifth solo exhibition, “Death of a Clown” that just finished up at Patrick Painter, Liz Craft examines, in part, the culture of Regretsy…(Etsy + Regret). Macrame-mishaps and craft-catastrophes are elevated to objects d’art. At once humorous and fresh, Craft’s odd string-beards, tears, and thrift store nick-nacks don’t disappoint.

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Grant Hamilton

Grant Hamilton

Grant Hamilton has this amazing polaroid series aptly titled “Geometries.” I’m totally loving his clean, simple, and clever compositions.


Hiroshi Watanabe’s Sex Dolls

Hiroshi Watanabe‘s photographs of fantasy sex dolls are an erie reminder of how detached some of us have become from reality and the great lenghts that we go to satisfy our deepest desires.

If you happen to be in LA you can meet the artist at a special reception and book signing at Kopeikin Gallery on Saturday February 19th from 6-8pm.

Kopeikin Gallery
2766 La Cienega Blvd
Los Angeles, California 90034

Sarah Brown

Sarah Brown’s surreal domestic photography and art express the diversity and psychological mysteries of our living spaces. I’m also a sucker for night photography.



Star Wars Meets M.C. Escher In This Rad Diorama



Fill your nerd quota for the day and check out this piece of lego sculpture made by Paul Vermeesch. It’s a diorama reproduction of M.C. Escher’s “Relativity” using Star Wars legos. It’s lit from the inside and even includes a faithful depiction of the plot from the much loved film series. Nice work, Paul!

Nezaket Ekici’s Liberates Herself By Cutting Off Her Hair

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Wearing a bright orange dress and armed with scissors, German artist Nezaket Ekici is tethered to the ceiling of a room via her hair. Long ropes act as handcuffs and are tied to the ends of her long brown strands. The only way out? To cut the strings or hair. Her performance, titled Atropos, was first presented in 2006 and again in 2008. It used 100 ropes, 100 hairlines, and 100 pitons (a type of metal spike) and lasted one hour.

We see that during Atropos, strings and hair are cut and dangle over Ekici’s eyes and other pieces of rope. At its core, it’s the act of freeing oneself from the ties (literally) that bind. In a statement about the work, posted on the Celeste Network:

She carries out an act of the self-liberation, while she frees herself with the help of a sissle from long ropes fastened at the roof and to the hair. She cuts off a part of her hair and in this way dissociates herself from a piece of herself. This work can be seen as a vital discussion about the question on the sense of life, that is partly characterised by striving for freedom. Particularly, because hair can be considered as a symbol of life.

This piece’s title comes from the Greek myth of the Moirai who are the goddesses of fate. The statement further explains:

Atropos, who is one of them splits according to the myth the fate threads of the life with a sissle. The artist shows with the radical act of the hair-cut a way out. She takes fate into her own hands and frees herself, like Atropos did. At least the act of the cutting can be seen as an attempt of liberation in itself. (Via Sweet Station)