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Saya Woolfalk

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Saya Woolfalk draws from dreams and desires, imagining fantasy lands, such as in her recent 3D work, “No Place.” She worked with an anthropologist to create her utopia, “No Place,” to explore the nature of humans and their capabilities for the future.

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Bara Prasilova’s Surreal And Playful Photography Uses Hair As A Prop

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Bara Prasilova‘s photography is both playful and disturbing. She uses soft pastels with pops of neon color to evoke feelings of nostalgia and innocence; simultaneously, she hints at themes of restraint and constriction. In her project for the Hasselblad Masters Book, she’s chosen to explore the theme of “evolve.” Her prop of choice is hair: a natural material that she portrays in a surreal and absurd fashion.

In one photograph, a woman jumpropes with a long Rapunzel-esque whip of hair; in another, a thick braid wrapped around a woman’s neck looks suffocating yet elegant. Prasilova explains:

“Through my photographs, I have been trying to understand human relationships and connections: long hair symbolises the invisible strings we use to strap somebody to us or, perhaps, the opposite, to let somebody loose. They are the threads of our emotions, worries and fears that we are afraid to loosen like hair.” (via I Need a Guide)

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Paintings That Capture Sinisterly Sweet Nostalgia

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Born in Tehran, amidst the 1980s political suffering and strife, Nouar’s family fled to Germany and then the US, where she resides today. Her oil and acrylic paintings touch on vintage commercial Americana with a sinister twist– but without being too cynical. Instead, each dollop of cream or slice of pie provokes a more tempting side of advertising, where the taste of nostalgia and its childlike promises are the main indulgence.

On this theme, the artist elaborates, “I have always been completely fascinated by our massive consumer culture and often feel everything around us is a commercial, constantly manipulating us into desiring things we don’t really have a need for, or shouldn’t want in the first place.”

The Wildly Warped Sculptures of Jonty Hurwitz

Much of the work of Jonty Hurwitz plays with perspective.  This is perhaps most obvious in the art pictured here.  Hurwitz creates severely warped sculptures that are snapped back to shape in the reflection of a cylindrical mirror.  He does this by scanning objects, digitally manipulating them, and fabricating the digital models.  This explanation, though, is extremely simplistic.  On his process, Hurwitz says:

“I usually start by expressing a concept using mathematical tools, often involving billions of calculations and many months of preparation. I then explore ways to manifest these formulae in the physical world.” [via]

Andrea Berretta

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Andrea Berretta’s design work is just so happy. Even the weird serpent/monster creatures look like something I would want to play charades with. His energetic, hand-drawn type gives his work an inviting atmosphere. Like, after seeing this, I’m totally ready for happy hour.

Interview: Marsha Pels

Marsha Pels poetically recontextualizes found objects of power and politics. Cohesion in her works is achieved though this particular modus operandi, though not necessarily in subject matter. Her gutsy recent exhibit at Schroeder Romero, “Dead Mother, Dead Cowboy,” made a connection between the recent death of her mother and abandonment by her partner. Artworks within this exhibition included a fluorescent lit, crystal-clear casting of Pels’ mother draped in mink stoles, her ex-lover on a deconstructed motorcycle, and castings of her own hands made in her mother’s gloves. For lack of a better word, this personal and haunting expose on desire, loss and morning is brave—laying bare an honest, and witty personal narrative. Recently Marsha discussed her creative inspiration, and her in-depth thought process behind her recent sculptural series. 

 

Witty Street Art Makes Smart Use Of Surroundings And Politics

The street artist known as Above works primarily with stencils and spray paint.  However it can also be said that he works primarily with politics and wit.  Above’s pieces expound on their surroundings, such as cast shadows, trash cans, electrical wires and even preexisting street art.  He also uses these surroundings to bring attention to political issues.  For example, a line of silhouetted people queue up down a city block as a comment on Spain’s high unemployment rate  and a reference to the lines at the unemployment office.  Another piece was daringly executed near an ATM – a masked figure points a gun at the ATM with one hand, and is handing cash to a real homeless woman nearby with the other.

Mr. Chiizu the artist’s iphone app

Mr. Chiizu will revolutionize the way you take photos on your iPhone. Why? Because now you can bathe every picture in the best graphics around. Mr. Chiizu is a photo app like no other because they offer artist themes for download, and the art is goood. Take Martinez & Trees for example, they made a pack for lovers of fast food, kitsch and tacos, which is pretty much everyone. table: artist’s themes. The Mr. Chiizu team worked on this slick and seamless app for over a year until it was bursting at the seam with features.