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Awesome Video Of The Day: Good Man By Raphael Saadiq

Raphael Saadiq”s video for Good man is a great example of how to tell a story through music. So much music these days is just a bunch of nonsense with nothing behind it but Saadiq has hit a home run.I don’t even really like R&B and I love it!

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Tomas Januska’s Gravity Series Defies The Laws Of Nature

Tomas Januska Tomas JanuskaTomas JanuskaTomas Januska

In his photographic series, Gravity, Tomas Januska takes snapshots of human bodies in unnatural and usually impossible poses. Beautifully photographed with clean crisp backgrounds, Januska highlights the absurdities of the forms and figures of his subjects. These are frozen moments that we normally would not be able to witness. Girls look as if they have been caught in a hurricane, skirts and hair billowing out around them. Boys are snapped mid-flight, shoes, caps and props flung to the side.

Januska manages to capture either violent and frenetic energy in his subjects, or a very still and quiet introverted moment. Some people seem as if they have been woken from their slumber, picked up and dangled mid-air. Individual’s clothes add to their narrative – a business woman leaping in heels and twirling her jacket seems caught in a triumphant post-meeting moment, or celebrating the latest merger at work. Another girl arches her back, with her hand resting on her head, as if regretting a wrong decision recently made.

In these portraits we can see the full range of human expression – each twist, bend, tilt, grimace tells it’s own story. Every tilted head, crooked limb and flexed muscle doing so for a reason. “Gravity” is not only about capturing postures and poses, but also about the natural drama and theatricality inherent in our bodies. (via Juxtapoz)

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Richard Wathen Mines The History Of Painting

Richard Wathen mines the history of painting tipping his hat to everyone from Picasso to Ingres.

Gregory Crewdson’s Photographs Look Like Eerie Cinematic Crime Scenes

Gregory Crewdson - photography Gregory Crewdson - photography Gregory Crewdson - photography Gregory Crewdson - photography

Acclaimed photographer Gregory Crewdson is a master of creating creepy scenes that have an air of mystery, violence and drama about them. He sets his images in small town America, but not as we know it. He presents scenes laden with loneliness; scenarios that are surreal; moments that are unnerving. Taking stylistic cues from Steven Spielberg, David Lynch and Diane Arbus, there is a strong narrative to Crewdson’s work. He repeatedly visits certain locations and waits until a particular moment presents itself in his mind’s eye, and then he tries to represent that as accurately as possible.

His photos are moments of people in a strange sort of limbo, or some state of reflection, all bathed in a dramatic, cinematic light. A woman lies submerged in a flooded living room, it isn’t clear whether she is dead or contemplating what went wrong to cause the disaster in her house; a young girl sits up in bed at night time, either going over some sinister, violent plan, or deciding whether her nightmare was real or not; a woman stands in the middle of an empty street, taxi behind her, door still open and driver waiting. All of Crewdson’s images are filled with heavy subtext, something that is left unsaid. He talks about the mysterious worlds he creates in an interview with The American Reader:

I think that’s really kind of a beautiful point, that at the core there is something very childhood-like about the whole activity of building and constructing a world. My mom just recently reminded me that I used to build these little miniature worlds outside at our country house and populate it with little figures. That whole thing about trying to create a world – there’s something very connected to childhood and reverie and daydreaming and fantasy. (Source)

See more snapshots of his dreamlike worlds after the jump. (Via We The Urban)

Catherine Chalmers Incredible Photographs Of Insects

Catherine Chalmers - photography insects

Catherine Chalmers - photography insects

Catherine Chalmers - photography

Catherine Chalmers manages to make captivating and beautiful those creatures that cause most of us to feel squeamish.  Chalmers travels the world to capture images and video of rodents and insects in their habitats.  Being one part scientist and one part artist, Chalmers is interested in bringing focus to nature using art as her vehicle.

For her most recent project, Leafcutters, which was partially funded by a Guggenheim Fellowship, Chalmers captured the activities of ants.  She was intrigued by the many similarities they have with humans.  She noted that like us, they inhabit almost every ecosystem on Earth, are one of the dominant species in their habitats and they impact the grand structure of other biological systems.  Beyond that they also wage war, take slaves, raise and keep other animals for food, and are also capable of making their own antibiotics.  They’re also, as Chalmers demonstrates, highly photogenic.

Chalmers American Cockroach series, equally beautiful and tough, captured arguably the world’s most dreaded insect.  Forcing us to confront our discomfort with cockroaches Chalmers wondered if she could seduce people into liking them because, as with the ants, they’re a lot like us.

Alvaro Laiz Captures the Secret Lives of Transgender Mongolians





In Mongolia, where the weight of tradition and Soviet rule still hang heavy, it is considered dangerously taboo to be a homosexual. Gays, lesbians, and transsexuals must keep their identities secret, often secluding themselves or participating in prostitution, in an attempt to safeguard their lives against violence and discrimination. In 2011, photographer Álvaro Laiz decided to capture the secret lives of these Mongolians in his series “Transmongolian.” Laiz initially traveled to Mongolia because he was interested in how the country’s newly opened borders affected the population, with the tradition of Mongolian culture meeting with Western influences from the outside. His research led him to connections with transgender individuals whose stories he decided to document with his photography.

They cannot express themselves normally except in certain places,” Laiz explained to Slate. “Your life becomes a scenario in which you are pretending to be someone else. Your job, your relatives become part of this performance, and little space is left to act as you would really want to be. It is insane.”

Laiz captures these ostracized Monogolians conducting their day-today lives alongside images of them in traditional Mongolian queen costumes. Laiz’s Mongolian series is the first of a larger project exploring transgender people in societies across the world. (via huffington post)

Alberto Tadiello’s Kenetic Sculptures

Alberto Tadiello’s works explore the possible forms of autonomous function associated with different objects and mechanisms as they undergo a parossistic conceptualization of their own functional logic. This logic is altered and tampered in order to start reflecting upon those deeper and psychological aspects which connect people to things and technologies.

ALMA’s Haunting Work On The Street


Brazilian artist ALMA has been getting up a lot lately with these haunting, stark, sometimes figurative pieces that move in and out of decaying urban environments in an incredibly natural way. I like that he mixes it up between extensive, symmetrical work that kind of reminds me of Richard Colman, and flat black stuff that’s really hard to define but affective nonetheless. South America is always killin’ it.