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Watercolor Paintings of Imagined Epic Proportions

Rob Sato - Watercolors Rob Sato - WatercolorsRob Sato - WatercolorsRob Sato’s watercolor paintings are whimsical clashes of documented history and personal dreaming: a magpie pictorial narrative of his own internal processing system or as he says, an “extension of writing” and “sifting through garbage. Getting a lot of trash out of my head.” His ability to condense worlds, communities, and landscapes into one surreal solid depiction, interestingly enough, conceptually harkens back to Vincent VanGogh’s statement on the watercolor medium itself as “a splendid thing” to “express atmosphere and distance, so that the figure is surrounded by air and can breathe in it.”

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A Show of Heads


If you’re a fan of sculpture be sure to check out Cinema Gallery’s exibition A Show of Heads. The exhibit tackles a wide array of subjects from which the artists reflect upon the psychological struggles that are fundamental to self-inquiry and the attempt to understand other human beings. It explores the pathos of idealism undermined by reality and the elusiveness of inner peace as promised by spiritual enlightenment.

A Show of Heads features work from Tom Bartel, Tanya Batura, Cristina Cordova, Thaddeus Erdahl, Judy Fox, Arthur Gonzalez, Roxanne Jackson, Doug Jeck, Akio Takamori, and Tip Toland.

Looks like an amazing exhibition, check out some of the artists after the jump!

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Beautiful/Decay Spring 2010 Line Available Now!

Beautiful/Decay Apparel Spring 2010

Beautiful/Decay is ringing in spring with our latest selection of art-based T-shirts. This season’s roster of artists include Ben Tegel, Jiro Bevis, YAIAGIFT, Steve Bonner & Ryan Riss. Playful re-works of iconic pop cultural references, sleek design, and humorous, hand-drawn graphics all collide within our latest collection.

The Spring 2010 Lookbook was shot on the Beautiful/Decay headquarters’ very own rooftop, and in the surrounding Downtown Los Angeles neighborhood.

Pick up your T-Shirts on the Beautiful/Decay online shop today, as these limited edition shirts sell out quick!

Inner Revelation- Maskull Lasserre Carves Skeletons Into Wooden Sculptures





Canadian artist Maskull Lasserre’s “recarved” sculptures are aptly named—Lasserre takes existing clichéd figural wood carvings and “exposes” the skeleton underneath. Of course, the new carving only seems like a reveal of what lies beneath. Part of the success of these works is how inevitable they feel.

Lasserre’s drawings and sculptures explore the unexpected potential of the everyday through allegories of value, expectation, and utility. Elements of nostalgia, accident, humor, and the macabre are incorporated into works that induce strangeness in the familiar, and provoke uncertainty in the expected.

In the style of an anatomy book, the bifurcated sculptures preserve the existing sculpture on one side while exposing the fantasy skeleton on the other. It’s a reverse of the classical artist’s process of learning about anatomy in order to draw more realistic figures. Lasserre is taking fully realized figures and imagining their bones. In an interview with Joseph Kendrick, Lasserre said,

“There is an intrinsic honesty and humility to the carving process. There is no magic, no hidden technology or trick, just the simple subtraction of what was already there. This humble quality makes the amazing alchemy that carving can achieve so much more interesting. … Like the physical materials I use, and the processes I apply, there is something categorical about death/mortality. The aspect of it that I try to coax out is that death is a potent sign of life — albeit an ended one. To carve skeletons into inanimate objects infers their past — and maybe even future — potential for life.” (Source)

Although these sculptures are whimsical, in concept if not execution, there’s an “Alas, poor Yorick!” undertone that’s sobering. Those who are fortunate enough to be healthy and whole rarely think of the inevitable end, the skull beneath the skin. Lasserre’s skilled carving work reveals what was never there, and in doing so makes us think of what eventually will be.

Steed Taylor Covers US Roads With Intricate Tribal Tattoos

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Steed Taylor uses the open road as a metaphor to skin in his “Road Tattoo” series. Taking designs usually found in tattoo art, Steed uses the same aesthetic and principle but on a much grander scale. He produces commemorative public installations on roads throughout the US much in the same way people add tattoos to their bodies to document a life event. The designs are mostly generic tribal tattoos and loop art seen most commonly on the body as bands around arms and legs. He uses these same ideas on a much larger scale inscribed underneath with names of specific groups he wants to commemorate.

Some ideas Steed has turned into “Road Tattoos” have been Aids and domestic abuse survivors, families of deceased war heroes, and non-denominational prayer groups. They have appeared all over the country and are on display until the paint fades. It documents a part of popular culture that crosses over into a larger scale to draw attention to a segment once thought of as alternative and brings it to the masses where it acts as a way for more of society to identify with the original sentiment since most are familiar with these designs in mainstream culture.

The Cookware Sculptures of Adeela Suleman

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The art of Adeela Suleman is built of common cooking utensils found in her home of Karachi, Pakistan.  Suleman utilizes objects such as strainers, measuring spoons, tongs, and enamel pots among many others.  While many of her pieces appear organic, others seem to be a form of armor or helmet.  She juxtaposes traditionally domestic tools with the appearance of items of aggression and physical protection.  Perhaps, a reminder of physical abuse directed against women as well as the absurdity of violence.

Artwork Of The Day: Mad Cow Motorcycle

I’m loving Billie Grace Lynn’s Mad Cow Motorcycle.  A combination of electric motorcycle and cow bones. Could this be commentary on our dependence of fossil fuels?