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Torkil Gudnason’s Electric Floral Still Lives

Torkil Gudnason Torkil Gudnason Torkil Gudnason Torkil Gudnason

Danish photographer Torkil Gudnason lives in New York City where he is mostly known for his work in fashion photography. As a side project, Gudnason creates botanical still lives using soft, ethereal lighting for his series “Electric Blossom” and “Hothouse Color.” Gudnason constructs his shots so that brightly colored backgrounds accent the flowers’ rich spectrum of color and texture. Gudnason compares the emergence of springtime to an explosion, noticing the energy that bursts forth during the change of seasons. He says, “I’ll glance out the window of my studio, and see a flower blooming in a most surprising place. Such a contrast—like magic. I think about how the flower got there and how it survives, how strong flowers are.”

The bright colors and contrasts in Gudnason’s botanical photography nearly render the images unnatural, as if they have been digitally manipulated. This illusion of artificiality enhances the beauty of the photography by asking the viewer to consider the boundaries of the natural and man-made, and the role of the photographer in creating alternate perceptions of reality. (via cross connect and plant propaganda)

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Kris Scheifele’s Pains On Paint

kris scheifele’s recent work is rooted in process and began with an investigation of paint’s physicality. after thirty to fifty layers of acrylic paint are applied to a support, these slabs are pulled up, sliced, carved, and/or peeled. free of a support and hung directly on the wall, the paint then performs by bending, sagging, and stretching. this elasticity suggests the body and skin while the ‘aestheticised’ decay alludes to the moth-eaten, rot, or fire damage. meant to reflect on cycles in life as well as cycles in art, scheifele’s work rides the line between painting and sculpture. exerpt: kris scheifele among 30 artists to watch in 2012.- NY Arts Mag (via minimal exposition & BH/2)

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Orgy Of The Rich At Sotheby’s

The group Art Against Cuts busted into a recent Sothebys while a Warhol piece was being auctioned with a large banner reading “Orgy Of The Rich” and throwing fake money into the air. the group states that they are “fighting back against the most significant governmental attack on the public sector in living memory. In the arts we are anticipating feeling the full weight of this socially irresponsible policy, especially in terms of funding for arts education. We are in solidarity with the other sectors fighting against the cuts and openly welcome co-ordinated action in creative and innovative ways.”

I think my favorite part about this performance was that so many of the wealthy in the room were actually enjoying the protest and taking photos with their phones. Guess it’s just another great story to tell while out on the yacht over the weekend. Watch the full video after the jump.

Scott Hove’s Installation “Cakeland” Transforms Interiors Into A Wonderland Of Sweets

Scott Hove - Cakeland Installation

Scott Hove - Cakeland InstallationScott Hove - Cakeland Installation

Imagine using your wildest imagination to create your dream fortress. What would it have inside? Scott Hove has taken a fairy-tale, dream-world created entirely out of what appears to be pastel sweets and turned it into an reality. His sickening sweet installation, titled Cakeland, uses sculpture, installation, and paint to construct a dramatic scene of cake-like decoration with a rococo flair, only instead of stucco molding, this sugary paradise is composed of delicately placed oranges, strawberries, and swirling, white icing. His elaborate work completely fills the building that holds it, which is labeled with an appropriate bright, neon sign displaying the word “Cakeland.” I cannot decide if Hove’s work is so alluring because of its fluffy, pastel details or the fact that it looks exactly like it is made up entirely of delicious, edible cake!

Hove explains that his process involves taking dark undertones and transforming them into something inviting and beautiful…and what is more pleasant than a place that surrounds and engulfs you in this never-ending, candy-colored comfort food? Hove’s artistic process uses endless imagination and creativity to allow his ideas of Cakeland to come to fruition.

I walk around my house, and see imaginary pieces on my wall, and then pick out the ones that I would most like to actually see hanging on the wall. Then I use every and any type of material to scratch the piece into existence. So much about making a piece of art is creating problems and solving them.

Ryuta Amae Manipulated Paradise

An artist of his time, Ryuta Amae is a clever manipulator of images. Could his great, peaceful photography evoke – in the form of vast, luxurious residences or of a Family Robinson type house swamped by palm trees – Paradise, Eden conquered at last and peace for civilisation ? This image of rest is deceiving. For the images here are the result of sage elaborations, of digital crossbreeding and hybrids. From these creations of various all sorts, the reference is the occident’s imagination of happiness, one might as well call it the sublime by default, the coming constantly delayed, condemning us to contemplate beautiful, empty images. «I create a copy, an archetypical image,» the artist explains, «my photo is only a virtual memory.» A skilful way of uniting reality and the imaginary, giving them a connection and a tension, a reactivating of that problem which has always been attached to the image : illusion. -Paul Ardenne

Mauro Perucchetti

Mauro Perucchetti

"Precious One," 2005

Mauro Perucchetti’s amazing work is bright, fun, and socially accurate. Perucchetti’s work unites Pop aesthetics with social comment, addressing some of the most pressing and difficult issues in today’s society in a way that is subtle and accessible, without being trite, shocking or obscure. Mauro is above all an artist who is connected; he sees the bigger picture and world affairs and has his finger on the pulse of contemporary society. Well played Mauro.