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Iain Baxter Re-imagines His 1966 Bagged Place Installation In The Key Of Rebecca

Iain baxter - Installation

Iain baxter - Installation

Iain baxter - Installation

Rebecca Levy died. Her apartment, situated above Raven Row gallery in London, did not; instead, it became a work of art by Iain Baxter, Canada’s most prominent conceptual artist.

Here, Baxter re-imagines his classic 1966 piece Bagged Place in each nook and cranny of Rebecca’s abandoned flat, wrapping clear plastic around the contents of which previously had been donated “intact” to the gallery from her family. Unsurprisingly, Rebecca’s Bagged Place, this 2013 rendition (collected here), seems to have more of a personal feeling, which immediately brings a new spark to not just Baxter’s work, but also, the underlying narrative or intention. This is not about sterilization nor consumerism, instead, it’s about Rebecca: her past, present, and future.

Before Rebecca’s things were bagged, they were alive because she was alive holding them, sitting in them, staring at them, and touching, loving, or losing them. Now that she has passed, her habitat is still and quiet, at least momentarily until the room slowly disassembles from one new pair of hands to the next. The thought of an interior space collapsing and dividing seems like a final goodbye, and the preservation of that farewell, heartbreakingly seems like an inability to confront death and an almost tragic prolonging of life. A room on life-support. How as viewers do we fall into the room? What do we take from it and where do we stay? When will we let go?

In this piece, amidst all the plastic isolation, the subject shifts with our own anxieties, daydreams, or curiosities in reaction to such careful preservation. We start to imagine Rebecca as we imagine ourselves: our own deaths, our own rooms, our own limbo before the dismantling. In this sense, Rebecca’s Bagged Place mirrors our own, and strangely we are Rebecca looking in from the outside.

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No Limit Album Covers

Ever wonder what rock album art would look like if it was done by the designers that brought you No Limit Records? If so just wander over to Something Awful for a look at some photoshop wizardry that is straight up gangster!

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William Lamson

Picture 11

I know. Anyone can string banana-hostages to a perfectly innocent tree; the gesture is simple enough, but who ever would’ve thought to do this? The playfulness, exuberance and creativity in William Lamson’s little “interventions” make you reconsider space, how we interact with it, and how we see the world. I just imagine attempting to climb to the top of these slippery slapstick yellow rungs only to discover what I’m dealing with is not a playstructure tree but…bananas. And if that’s not enough, check out the vid after the jump that shows the artist in a Hell-raiser style mask, made entirely of bananas with dynamite wicks on the end. One by one he lights them, causing them to explode in Chiquita’s ultimate pimple/fruit popping extravaganza.

Patrick Bergsma’s Sculptures Of Inverted Tree Houses Look Like Post Apocalypse Relics

Patrick Bergsma - Sculpture Patrick Bergsma - Sculpture Patrick Bergsma - Sculpture
Patrick Bergsma - Sculpture
Patrick Bergsma‘s sculptures aren’t your childhood’s tree houses. Though they embody the whimsical architecture that a child might dream up, they also feature urban decay: rusted cars, broken down buildings, overgrown houses in disrepair. The trees seem to spring forward, like next-generation dwellings that have survived a nuclear apocalypse.
Bergsma’s sculptures also play with physics, sometimes featuring an inverted house underneath the roots of a large, gnarled tree. The barren branches loom over tiny figures that sit beneath them, as though they’re contemplating lives past or lives lost. In a way, the trees almost seem to depict a life that an urban dweller might hope for: a simpler life in the outdoors, free from worrying about busted pipes or rent or the other responsibilities of caring for a permanent dwelling.
There’s a peacefulness to Bergsma’s work. It asks us to imagine ourselves somewhere else and shows us that, even when we’re thinking about watering the lawn or fixing the shingles, we’re still a part of nature.(via I Need a Guide)

Suzanne Heintz Photographs the American Dream With Her Mannequin Family

Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz

Photographer Suzanes Heintz is a self-proclaimed spinster. As a single woman, she got fed up with the bombardment of questions about when she was going to get married. Tired of being pittied, she decided to confront this issue head on. She purchased two mannequins – one male and one female child – and the series Life Once Removed was born. Dressing up and posing with her fake family, she stages witty representations of the American Dream. Ski trips, vacations, and stereotypical romantic moments are all acted out by Heintz, and she sets the scene perfectly. These colorful images feel saturated, in both how they look and the emotional exuberance of the her expression and body language.

Heintz rejects the notion that to be a successful woman means that you have to fulfill a laundry list of achievements, not limited to an education, career, home, family, accomplishment, and enlightenment. In an interview with Feature Shoot, she explains why she created Life Once Removed:

I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.

All of these photographs are shot on location. When Heintz lays her head in mannequin’s husband’s lap while in the park, it’s totally real, and an important aspect to Heintz’s series. She goes on to say:

While I need the public to act as character and context for the actual photo or video, I also need their responses to make the effort a success as an instigator for social change. The reaction can vary from a raised eyebrow with a head turn, to a blast of laughter, to taking their own snapshots while posing with the mannequins. It depends a lot on the location. But most importantly, it stops people in their tracks long enough to ask me what the heck I’m doing. Because the project is so audacious and flat-out funny, it helps me reach the public, and actually get them to let their guard down long enough for me to have a conversation with them. (Via Feature Shoot)


Stephanie Davidson’s Internet Piles

Stephanie Davidson makes digital collages out of everyday objects. This may sound like an overly simple concept but her selection of objects and their arrangements are both bizarre and humorous. The  Cornrow pile after the jump is by far my favorite.

Dea Lellis

Dea Lellis is an artist from São Paulo, Brazil.  She creates charming illustrations filled with humor and a dash of edge.

Artist Duo Write And Draw Naughty Things All Over Your Grandmother’s Fine China

Kris Aaron and Andy Walker - Illustration 3 Kris Aaron and Andy Walker - Illustration 7 Kris Aaron and Andy Walker - Illustration 2Kris Aaron and Andy Walker - Illustration 4

Kris Aaron and Andy Walker are slightly modifying the purpose of fine China dishes. It’s now decorated with messages and gay illustrations. “Shit again”, “Cock monster”, “I’m going to fuck you” and pornographic images are hand drawn onto plates and kitsch ceramic ornaments. They either paint slogans or sexual images on small objets such as a tiger or a swan or desert plates. The couple just wanted to check “how cute it would be if they were more gay.” 

All the pieces in the Pansy Ass ceramics series are one of a kind. Already collectors of similar items, they redoubled their research in thrift shops and vintage flea markets to find the perfect antique China dishes for their collection. Their intention was to accentuate the kitsch side of plates and objects. “For instance, we have this swan that’s the gayest thing I’ve ever seen,” Aaron says, “and we thought it’d be funny if we painted ‘masc’ (like masculine) on it.” The result is a weird combination of classic patterns and graphic scenarios.

Ideally, the artists would want their embellished dishes to be displayed at Macy’s. From porno chic to porno kitsch there could a part of the market interested in inviting their grandmother to a fancy cucumber sandwich tea party. (via Lost At E Minor).