Georgia Russell Uses Her Scalpel On Images Of Naked Bodies To Bring Them To Life

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A naked body lacerated by regular and organized cuts. The paper sculptures of Georgia Russell are full of expression and poetry. Using just her scalpel to create motion on two dimension pictures.

She collects magazines and newspapers. And browses flea markets to find books to cut. Originally from Scotland, she moved to France after graduating and that’s when she started tearing out books she found on the docks of the Seine in Paris. The artist found in the act of cutting that she was liberating the books from their sculptural forms. Humanizing and creating a connection between the books and the viewers.

Georgia Russell is drawing with her scalpel. The repetitive patterns she designs on the paper look like brisk brushstrokes. Blending with the background, creating texture mimicking feathers blown by an imaginary wind. She gives a voluptuous movement to the cutouts. Circles and waves are embracing the position of the naked bodies.
The artist thinks of cutting paper as a mean to express her feelings. A freedom of speech she uses to captures strong emotions into her pieces. The notion of destruction is omnipresent in her interpretation of the use of the scalpel. However, it’s a positive one. From an abandoned piece of paper and her scalpel, she transforms her turmoil into an organic and vibrant art piece. (via INAG)

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Blank William Redesigns The Iconic Stormtrooper Mask Into Three Futuristic Animals

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Like many of us, Blank William grew up a fan of the Star Wars series. Now, he has used his passion and talent as a designer to create a new variety of Stormtroopers—ones with animal features. His feral, futuristic battalion consists of two series, The New Order: White and The New Order: Black. Currently, there are elephant, rhino, and hippo designs, and William has brilliantly meshed the animals’ physical features with the soldiers’ glossy plastoid armor, dark eyes, and ventilation details. Each one is accentuated with gold or silver, giving them a slightly more lethal and formidable appearance. William’s work seems to be playing off the expressionless and ruthless appearance of the original Stormtroopers.

William’s smooth, space-age style is carried into his other works, including a series of animal chess pieces. You can view more of his work on his website. For our readers with Star Wars on the mind—as we know, The Force Awakens is released next month—we’re curious about what you think of William’s reimagining of the iconic Stormtroopers; do you prefer this look for your favourite soldiers? What other animals would be fit to protect the Empire? Comment below! (Via designboom)

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Don Lucho’s Extraordinary Installations Simulate Everyday Life Using Found Cardboard

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Chilean artist Don Lucho creates installations from found cardboard that simulate extraordinary scenes from everyday life. During a street fair in Santiago, Chile, Don Lucho crafted a fruit and vegetable stand, titled “El Puesto de Don Lucho,” stocked fully with items made of paper. He stayed there the entirety of the fair, acting just like another ordinary fruit stand.

“I sold a lot of cardboard fruits. The…reactions were different, some were angry because the fruit was fake, others thought it was a hidden camera show, other people laughed. A lot of people asked many questions like what is this fruit for or if there was real fruit inside the cardboard fruit? The real fruit sellers got very angry and started shouting: Stop buying cardboard fruit! It’s not real fruit!” (source)

Another one of his installations, “Casa de Carton,” depicts an entire apartment, kitchen, toilet and all, completely made of cardboard. With a skateboard leaning against the wall, clothes thrown about, and an unmade bed, the apartment, despite its paper construct, perfectly mimics a truly lived in environment. He has also created various installations that reproduce accidents. On the streets of Santiago, Chile, Lucho, along with collaborator Quillo, created a cardboard car crash, as well as a small air craft that looks as if it has fallen from the sky.

Don Lucho’s work aims to question materiality both is an artistic sense as well as a monetary one. Through imitating the real, using materials found on the street, Don Lucho provokes the viewer to assess what value truly is —  what does it mean for an object to be worth something? His work falls in line with the postmodern notion of simulating the real, which in turn, become “signs” of the real. If his work can provoke emotions and thoughts just as the genuine objects could, then, what is the true difference? Does Lucho’s work prove that the simulated can be just as powerful as the authentic? Or, does it prove that the authentic no longer has such a individualized meaning, as the simulated actually deflates meaning of the real? (think Andy Warhol’s Death and Disaster Series). Lucho states, “the confusion people feel when they first encounter the scene makes them doubt what is real and what impact it should have one them.” (source)

Sarah Duyer Enlivens Familiar Ceramic Objects With Creepy Limbs, Teeth, And Fingers

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Sarah Duyer is a San Francisco-based artist who brings ceramic tableware to life in unsettling and thought-provoking ways. Teapots with spidery legs scuttle across their platforms, dripping with black and blood red paint; bowls and mugs with human teeth and fingers resemble the offspring of botched laboratory experiments. Infused with body parts and the illusion of movement, each pot, bowl, and mug seems to take on a half-consciousness that troubles its status as an ordinary, innocent object.

Duyer’s creations arise from a curiosity about how an object’s design can produce comfort or discomfort—and her works elicit both. By coupling fun, pastel colors with creepy body parts, her works make us amused and repulsed. The interplay of life and death is also visible; one teapot (or “creature pot,” as she calls them) appears to stumble wearily, half of its legs broken off. The use of encaustic wax and rough, exposed clay in some of her pieces further adds to this ominous theme of biological deterioration.

In the following statement provided to Beautiful/Decay, Duyer explains her unique and investigative approach to ceramics, which seeks to re-explore the medium while reinvesting familiar objects with meaning:

“Ceramics as a medium is kind of tricky to classify, since it’s still stuck in the debate of whether it should be considered a fine art or a craft. I think with this project I really wanted to utilize my knowledge of traditional forms and techniques and challenge the idea that the two have to be separate. I wanted to alter the tradition and explore the relationship we have with the ceramic pieces that we interact with on a daily basis.”

In addition to these sculptural works, Duyer creates functional ceramics, such as plates and mugs etched with unique designs. Check out her website, Instagram, and Tumblr to learn more.

Futuristic Glowing Orb Creates An Interactive Experience With Light And Sound

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Berlin based digital art and design studio, Onformative, has recently installed their newest project, ANIMA iki, an “immersive experience of light and sound.” The installation is made up of a large glowing sphere that spans two meters in diameter and is suspended from the ceiling in a dark room. The orb is lit up by a visual aimed to mimic a “viscous metallic fluid” that’s hue and tonality shift and become distorted, creating a futuristic, mysterious aura. The “glow” within the sphere is created from a powerful wide angle projector that uses a fish eye lens and can create 360 degrees images. By manipulating the audible frequencies, the installation is able to “respond” to the space though picking up and reverberating the sound back. ANIMA iki is able to create visual and sounds in real time by responding to a Kinect tracking system that has the ability assess movement within its atmosphere.  As the orb has a complex interaction with light and sound, the installation is able to seem alive. The orb seems to be able to have a personal interaction with the viewer, creating a strange, interesting experience.

Founded in 2010 by Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, Onformative offers a space they describe as “guided by an emotional approach, we constantly search for new forms of creative expression. Through an experimental practice we create meaningful works to challenge the boundaries between art, design and technology.”

The work was originally commissioned for the Amsterdam Dance Event and has since been exhibited at various galleries in the Netherlands and Germany. 

Darwinian Voodoo: Creepy Lifestyle Attire Created From Hair And Teeth

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Artists Mariana Fantich from Ukraine and Dominic Young from The UK have teamed up to create a collaboration known as Fantich & Young. Their latest project, Darwinian Voodoo, aims to merge two seemingly opposing bodies of thought, Darwin’s theory of evolution and the ceremonial ritual aspects associated with Voodoo, allowing them to indulge in a super-natural exploration. Through reappropriating and mimicking the aesthetic of ceremonial dress and placing it within the context of an evolutionary-based system, Fantich & Young allow themselves to create something that is no longer real nor super real, but entirely its own entity. They have manipulated the notion of a theological super-natural by shaping it to fit an aesthetic discourse of scientific truth, provoking a sort of mythical, yet superior lifestyle. The work is created from “symbolic ready-made materials…address[ing] parallels between social evolution and evolution in the natural world: Nature as model or nature as threat.” The work seems to simultaneously address that humans are, in fact, at the hands of nature, and that humans do, in fact, have the power to manipulate their own genetic fate. Perhaps aspects of contemporary life we do not associate with the “natural” world, i.e. social media and fashion, are actually a part of a modern day survival of the fittest.

They are branding their project as “a new pedigree lifestyle,” the collection itself being titled Apex Predator. The collection “features male and female ceremonial attire customised with human hair, bones and eyes. Collection includes shoes, accessories and perfume laden with thousands of dentures.” (Via designboom)

Made With Color Presents: Pop Culture And Vintage Comics Colide In The Work Of Emmett Potter

Emmett Potter - Design 40Emmett Potter - Design 36Emmett Potter - Design 35Brawl_BlackFinal.jpgWe’re glad to introduce, via the website building platform Made With Color, new artists weekly. Made With Color is an interactive website builder helping creative people design their portfolio without a complicated set up. The templates are minimalistic in their structure and their colors, allowing the eyes of the readers to focus on the art pieces.  This week we’re excited to share the work of Made With Color user Emmett Potter.

Vibrant colors and figurative shapes live in Emmet Potter’s art pieces. The artist uses mid 20th century comic graphics, advertisements, found objects and photography. His subjects therefore become mixed media pieces blending collage and paint. He calls them ‘handmade ready-mades’. Characters in action involving guns, missiles, love and war in a vivid and  expressive environment. The content depicted by Emmett Potter is inspired by Pop culture and Jungian archetypes. A chosen process to help increase communication with the mass and unfold collective consciousness. The rendering takes the form of traditional canvas paintings or unusual sculpture composition.

The Ecstasy Of Death: Paul Fryer’s Eerie And Darkly Passionate Sculptural Installations

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Paul Fryer is an artist based in London, England. We featured his works in 2011, but his stunning sculptural installations—which explore agony and human folly in passionate tandem—warrant a second examination. His works unsettle the cultural imagination by coupling mortality with religious imagery, depicting human figures on the verge of destruction and death.

One notable work is a sculpture of winged Lucifer, thrashing amidst a net of telegraph cords that suspend him above the altar steps of the Holy Trinity Church, Marylebone. This piece was part of a solo exhibition called Let There Be More Light, shown in October of 2008. The dramatic lighting casts Lucifer in dramatic shadows, and his tarnished, corpse-like skin gleams with antiquity and the torture of life-within-death. This work signifies the fallible human, and the chaos and terror of one’s own making. The venue—with its stained glass windows and domed ceiling—provides the perfect space for this dramatic, allegorical scene to unfold.

Also shown here is Fryer’s “Blue Pieta” (2010), the martyr in the electric chair, and Lilith (2010), a fallen angel bound to a platform by golden wires. In more recent years, Fryer has created jellyfish-like sculptures out of Murano crystal. You can view more of his strange and dark world on his website. (Via Empty Kingdom)