Monique Schreijer Creates Larger Than Life Wigs That Walk The Fine Line Between Fashion And Art

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Monique Schreijer makes prodigious, multi-colored and wearable wigs. So far, six samples have been designed by the artist in her NYC studio. Each one has a theme and a story leading to dreams and fantasies. Monique Schreijer has created wigs that, aligned together, resemble to a world of tales. Inspired by Sophia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette, braiding her own hair and playing with Barbie dolls when she was a child, she brings something innocent yet symbolic in each wig.

Almost everything including the jewelry is hand made, except for the birds and butterflies. Monique Schreijer uses mixed medias such as of Kanekalon hair, tinted powder, faux pearls, hot glue, feathers, rubber bands, found sticks, wire, glitter, toys, and scraps. She has come up with six wigs over two years. Each wig has a name, a color assigned to it and a detailed theme, narrated on the hair and which is taking most of the space:

‘1.Black – Plague of Marseilles,
2.Red – Queen,
3.Pink – Cotton candy/unicorn,
4.Green – Valley of Cocora,
5.Multicolored/sailboat/dog – California.
6.Blue – Dreamy girl’

Monique Schreijer uses symbols to express what moves her. Ladders to reveal escapism, black skeletons and rats for darkness and evil, flying birds and a flourishing nest for freedom and fertility. Not only are the wigs beautifully crafted, they are a source of creativity and imagination.

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Sprios Hadjidjanos Combines Ultra Violet And 3D Printing To Transform Plants Into Futuristic Images

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The incredibly innovative, tech-infused work of artist Sprios Hadjidjanos is created from an impressive variety of methods using modern technology. He combines the amazing world of 3D printing and other modern devices with the natural, tranquil world of plants. When you first glance at his series titled “Displacement/Height Maps,” it is almost impossiple to tell how the work was made. Using UV prints on carbon fiber, Hadjidjanos miraculously births an amazing hybrid representation of a part of our natural environment and made-man substances. Large-format, Technicolor images of different flora are created, colored brilliantly in all different hues of the spectrum.

Sprios Hadjidjanos beautifully captures the balance of the natural world in juxtapose to artificial elements in his other series, which transforms the photography in the historical book Uniform der Kunst from 1928. The artist’s unbelievable techniques have rendered these blooming flowers three dimensional, allowing you to see every line and detail. He did by scanning the original photographs, then using intricate algorithms, printed the images onto hundred of points. The artist’s version of the photography looks similar to the original, but look much more mechanical in an almost science fictional way. He not only uses modern technology in his processes, but also displays them in his art, like his larger than life iphone. His installations, like Network Gradient, use a combination of wireless routers, optic lights, and electronic circuits to forms beams of light like that of another world. His artwork ingeniously lays our world of technology out in a strange, futuristic way that is both strange and beautiful. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Jae-Hyo Lee’s Exquisitely Smooth Wooden Sculpltures Give Tree Trunks A Second Life

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Jae-Hyo Lee’s latest work is a true work of perfect imperfection. He works with the imperfect forms and patterns of wood and reworks them in order to produce smooth, polished, and functional works of art. The combination of the wood’s natural shapes and the work he puts into the wood himself make for a series of pieces that are a perfect balance of nature and the presence and interference of man in nature. He creates a sort of hyper perfection which relates our relationship with beauty to our relationship with nature.

The process of Lee’s work is equally interesting to note: he spends time assembling an assortment of bits and pieces of wood, which he then spends time polishing and burning. This process allows him to rework the structure of the wood and create the meticulous shapes that can be seen in the final product.

Lee’s work is however not only a process of creation: he expresses the way in which he works very much with the natural structure of the wood, He says that he likes to “ make the most out of the material’s inherent feeling”, which underlines the fusion of nature and the man made. His project is full of a positive energy that brings a new perspective on the roles of wood its presence in our everyday lives. The fact that his series includes both sculpture and furniture adds to its beauty and complexity.

Sarah Louise Davey’s Ceramic Sculptures Are Blended Human And Bird Freaks Illustrating The Reality Of Our Lives

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Half humans, half birds; Sarah Louise Davey’s ceramic sculptures are the symbol of emotional duality. She is blending a woman’s face with a beak and a feathered gaze. The eyes seem so real, they are preventing us from looking away. Insisting that we come closer and try to understand the meaning of it all. The other sculptures are hanging from leather cords and chains. Two arms ending with birds’ feet with rose metal claws. The arms and the faces are covered in wrinkles, leaving us wondering how old these creatures are, and if this is what will happen to us too. It will, in the artist’s imagination.

Looking at the sculptures, it feel like we’re entering the world of the wizard of oz meets the barnyard, fantasy meets reality. Isn’t it what we’re living daily? If we think about it, the result is far from being pretty and perhaps this is Sarah Louise Davey’s purpose. In order to reflect deeper on society, norms and beauty we need to stretch the limits of our understanding. When the artist exhibits those pieces, she is almost questioning if we, as individuals are not all freaks after all. Freaks that need to be analyzed and understood, because underneath the wrinkled skin and the animal features we each have a complicated unique soul giving us an infinity of possibilities. ‘At the heart of these works is the eternal push and pull of the spirit’.

Sarah Louise Davey is represented by Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia. (via Sweet Station)

Chris Haas Sculpts And Embellishes Animal Skulls Into Mystical, Dark Fantasy Creatures

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Chris Haas is a Colorado-based artist who creates otherworldly skulls embellished with bright paints and flowing sculptural details. Among his ever-growing collection are various mystical creations, from ghostly green bears to devilish, silver-violet rams. Haas has even fashioned his own hybrids, such as a deer skull with mask-like detailing, a fierce beak, and keen incisors. Eyes like fiery orbs or dark obsidian pools peer from cavernous sockets, engaging the viewer with an eerie, beyond-the-grave vitality. In a final gothic-esque touch, each creature is displayed on ornate wall mounts.

Haas’ work is not your typical taxidermy; his is a project of passion and immense imagination. His studio—pictures of which can be seen on his Facebook—looks like it was transported out of a dark fantasy novel. His style is distinct, blending childlike dream imagery with the aura of the mythical undead. Instilling each skull with its own character, he renews them with life while also attending to the faces of death with respect, curiosity, and creativity. Visit Haas’ website, Facebook page, and Instagram to see more of his remarkable creations.

Haejin Lee’s Exquisite Ceramic Sculptures Unravel Before Your Very Eyes

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Intertwined strips of ceramics escaping from their original form. Haejin Lee’s abstract sculptures blend perfection and fantasy. A flawless object, face or body part suddenly disintegrates into a uncontrolled harmonized chaos. Fascinated by the indefinite loop of the Mobius strip (a surface with a non orientable property), she brings into her art pieces the transformation of a flat surface into a 3 dimensional rendering. The final piece mirrors two essential aspects for the artist: continuity and infinity.

The dichotomy between perfection and confusion reflects the technical difficulties the artist had to face while conceptualizing the pieces. In order to get a steady work of art, she had to anticipate the weight of the strips once dried and heated. Often created in monochromatic tones, the plain colors add intensity to the sculptures.
Haejin Lee is inviting us to interpret the passage from reality to surrealism. As if the strips, bandages of our exterior enveloppe had to fly away in order to reveal the essence of our souls, imagination and creativity. By acknowledging that the pieces were ‘almost impossible to balance’, the artist insists on the difficulty yet essential need for individuals to unconsciously or not; define their equilibrium.

Discover the work of Haejin Lee, her abstract sculptures and her tableware collection on her website and Instagram. (via This Is Colossal).

Li Hongbo Arranges Thousands Of Paper Objects Into A Massive, Malleable Sculpture Of War Weapons

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Li Hongbo is a Beijing-based artist who builds elaborate and flexible paper sculptures that ripple and shift before our eyes. Featured here is “Irons for the Ages, Flowers for the Day,” a large-scale installation currently on display at the SCAD Museum of Art. The work—which spans the entirety of a gallery—involves thousands of small paper objects bound together by honeycomb layers of glue. Close up, the bright shapes align themselves like an undulating, flowery rainbow; step back, however, and you’ll see that together the shapes amass into the greater form of guns and artillery. In a surprising clash of innocent colors and delicate paper with the brutality of war, Hongbo produces a curious (and potentially deceitful) optimism for deadly weapons.

Hongbo’s work draws upon the ancient, cultural tradition of paper-making in China, which dates back to the Han Dynasty (206 BC–220 AD). Inspired by this art form, Hongbo has reinvented it on a grand scale. Other projects include malleable bodies and busts, such as a version of Michelangelo’s David that unfolds spectacularly. The ability to metamorphose is integral to Hongbo’s works; with the politics left aside (or at least ambiguous), his sculptures challenge our perceptions by unsettling solid forms with their built-in fluidity. Whether it’s guns or classical statues, we can’t help but to reconsider the materiality and purpose of objects as they transform before our eyes.

“Irons for the Ages, Flowers for the Day” will be showing until January 24th, 2016. Check out SCAD’s website to learn more. (Via designboom)

Matt Kaliner’s Beautifully Strange And Gravity-Defying Sandcastles

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Matt Kaliner is a sociology lecturer at Harvard University with a fascinating side project: the construction of elaborate, beautifully strange sandcastles. “Although I study the sociology of art, amongst other things, I have not worked up anything particularly deep about sandcastles,” he told The Atlantic. “I am motivated entirely by the sheer joy of playing on the beach, and making something out of what I can find that day” (Source). Despite his modesty, Kaliner’s creations are remarkable works of art with imposing presences; fortified with sticks and underground braces, they rise powerfully from the sand, twisted and knotted like ancient geological formations.

Despite the tenuous, ever-crumbling nature of sand, Kaliner’s castles are surprisingly formidable; most of them are swallowed by the rising tide rather than knocked down by it. “Curious kids are the No. 1 killers of my sandcastles, which I certainly sympathize with,” Kaliner says good-humouredly. “I would have done the same at that age!” (Source) Whether by nature or meddlesome child, the inevitable destruction of Kaliner’s works makes them transitory works of art; their limited lifespans heightens their beauty and intensifies their presence.

Check out Kaliner’s work on Flickr. More gravity-defying castles after the jump. (Via Booooooom)