Anne Lemanski Creates Quirky Sculptures Of Postmodern Animals

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American artist Anne Lemanski creates quirky, conceptual sculptures of animals. She begins by creating a copper rod amateur which she then cuts, manipulates, and braises together to create what she refers to as a three dimensional line drawing. She then uses various materials, such as prints created from images of her own collages, leather, and vinyl. These works act as a further adaptation of her collage practice. Her sculpture aesthetic roots from images she has been familiar with for years. As the Alumna Artist-In-Residence at the McColl Center for Arts + Innocation in Charlotte, North Carolina, Anne Lemanski developed her practice between both her collage and sculptural elements, leading her to create her newest exhibition, Simulacra. As the artist moved between techniques of meditative cutting and pasting to the physicality of creating a structure, she began to realize that ultimately, despite the difference in the materiality of the work, what was creating was the simulation of animals. By creating a falsified “double” of something that is in fact real. Lemanski allows herself to enter the postmodern discourse of the notion of “simulacra,” a concept associated with French philosopher Jean Baudrillard. Within the philosopher’s work Simulacra and Simulation (1981), Baudrillard argues that by creating “copies,” society has replaced all meaning with mere symbols. Thus, the human experience has become hyper-real, as all meaning is just a simulation of what once was. Lemanski notes that her own practice replicates the same notion, as she creates the simulacrum of nature. She allows two dimensional imaging to become three dimensional. This process allows the viewer to then experience the simulated, while channeling the real.

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Ron Nagle Uses Doo-Wop Music And Hot Rod Painting To Create His Unusually Seductive Ceramic Sculptures

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Ron Nagle makes mini sculptures using a variety of colors and shapes. He takes ceramics to another level, transforming utilitarian pottery into abstract modern art. In the ‘Five O’Clock Shadow’ series he presents innovative forms mixed with saturated colors.

He uses different methods to produce his pieces such as slip-casting and hand-molding. Dealing with traditional and non-traditional materials, including glazed ceramic, Sculp-metal, polyurethane, and epoxy. Ron Nagle always lays his inspiration on paper. Transferring the sketch into a 3 dimensional piece. The sculptures are never more high than a few inches. The shapes are figurative and translate the artist’s passion for tea cups, its handles and bowl volume. His gets inspired by the works of Giorgio Morandi, Philip Guston, Japanese Momoyama ceramics, and George Herriman.

Ron Nagle injects in his art pieces a glimpse of pop art and a dash of music. He is a ceramist as well as a confirmed singer. The sculptures seem to be on the verge of moving. At any moment, they can get moving. The top parts, which are almost all twisted and contorted are waiting for the signal of the viewer to maliciously escape from their pedestal.
The artist wants to trigger new sensations from the viewer. His work is meant to be singular. According to him, there’s no point in looking at a form of art for which we already felt something. Emotions generated from his work has to be fresh and possibly never been experienced before.

Ron Nagle is represented by the Matthew Marks gallery in New York. (via Sweet Nation)

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Jan Fabre’s Massive Marble Brain Sculptures Explore A Fusion Of Spirituality And Post-Mortem Anatomy

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Jan Fabre is an innovative visual artist whose works explore the realms of psychology, anatomy, and metamorphosis. Throughout his career, Fabre has been particularly fascinated by the human brain—the seat of cognition, and arguably, the spirit—and the way neurobiology intersects with the heart. He studied the brain for over ten years, working in dialogue with neurobiologist Giacomo Rizzolatti. Wondering about the brain’s role in the experience of emotion and empathy, Fabre asks himself and his viewers, “Do we feel with our brains and think with our heart?”

Featured here is a series of Fabre’s Carrara marble brain sculptures, each one bearing surprising elements; insects crawl across the veined surfaces, and scissors and corkscrews protrude in a macabre flare of the surgeon’s table. Fabre experienced being in a coma twice in his life, which caused him to explore the brain as an eerie, post-mortem state (Source). As a result, death is present throughout these works; the brains stand as white monuments not only to our mortality, but to our statuses as both individuals and interconnected human beings. Following this theme, Fabre has also sculpted marble bodies resting on tombs, similarly adorned with insects, which represent the transmutation of the physical and spiritual, life and decay.

Fabre’s work will be exhibited at the Deweer Gallery in Otegem, Belgium, from November 4th–December 20th, 2015. Titled 30 Years / 7 Rooms, the show features Fabre’s decades-long collaboration with Mark Deweer. (Via Hi-Fructose)

Dave Rowe’s Haunting Sculptures Of Broken Boardwalks And Rollercoasters

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Midwestern artist Dave Rowe creates sculptures of time worn structures influenced by American landscapes. His work has developed through a means to “explore history,” as he believes that addressing the change and aging of a landscape reflects not only the passage of time, but also has psychological implications about those who inhabited that change. Memories, ideologies, and personal histories are shaped by one’s surroundings. Therefore, a landscape can serve as a reflection of a collective “personal” experience. By capturing one specific physical moment, the artist allows himself to reflect not a universal or personal truth, but instead, acts as a sort of mirroring of a hyper-specific type of development. The artist re-creates recognizable, yet unspecific buildings that allude to an archival, physical space. His sculptures, focusing on geometrical infrastructures, have been shaped by his own upbringing in the American Midwest and have been influenced by the changes in the American landscape. Specifically, his work focusses on the more rural areas, as the relocation of factories have dissolved the need for industrial buildings. He captures how functionality, or rather, a lack of it, can act as a record of topographical transformation. Even his use of color is a reference to time; he pairs “barn red or tar black” along with “brighter colors evocative of graffiti,” in order to reflect the often seen palette of a forgotten edifice. Rowe creates these structures scaled to hit at eye level, allowing the viewer to enter the space emotionally, and hopes to open a discourse for personal reflection.

Haegue Yang’s Mysterious Orb Sculptures Covered With Thousands Of Bells Chiming In Motion

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Hundreds of small metal balls covering the surface of the sculpture series created by Korean, Berlin based Artist Haegue Yang. ‘Sonic Figures’ are geometric abstract creatures that come to life when they’re shaken by a human hand.

Haegue Yang speaks her own language. She has come up with her own vocabulary through abstraction. She doesn’t need the viewers to understand the meaning and influence of her work. She is offering an experience. The Sonic sculptures were created while she was working on another project during her residency in Glasgow. While listening to music, she imagined developing a piece that will ring in unison when moved around.

The artist is used to working with random household items. From that starting point, she produces sculptural assemblage. By playing with the vibrations and the chimes of the bells, she explores what it is to be human. She defies human basic senses such as sight, sound, smell, and touch. A multi sensory and mobile environment where the viewers can appreciate through her art their body and intellect. Focusing on sensory experiences, Haegue Yang not only liberates charming sounds and subtle chills from basic elements, she also triggers the viewer’s will to interact and experiment.

Jessica Dance Knows How To Satisfy Gluttony By Knitting Make-Believe Meals

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All the comfort foods we dream of eating but that we’d rather watch from a distance to avoid calories. Jessica Dance made it happen! The art director/model maker/prop stylist collaborated with photographer David Sykes for Stylist magazine to deliver perfectly arranged hand knitted fake meals.

A full platter of English breakfast, beans on toasts, a hot dog covered with mustard. And if we need more condiments we can find them next to our cutlery, salt, pepper, ketchup; Jessica thought of everything. Using lambswool and a knitting machine, she fashioned all the foods at home. She says the bacon was the hardest to achieve as she wanted all the fat to be as real as possible.

The colors are of course true to real food colors. But the tones are slightly altered, giving a healthy, non greasy aspect that we should have found looking at the dishes. If it wasn’t for the fact that this was commissioned for an adult magazine we could have thought we were looking at kids’ toys.
There’s something warm and gentle in the story. And it’s not just about the food elements. It’s a combination. The way it’s photographed, the set up and the overall look of the food that’s transforming random meals into a grown-up tea party set. (Via Booooooom)

Artist Rachel Dien Creates Delicate Fossils From Flowers

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London based artist Rachel Dein creates fossils from everyday objects. She allows herself to preserve tangible pieces of the present as keepsakes for the future. The simplicity of the work adds to its honesty and preciousness. Dien studied as a propmaking apprentice at the English National Opera, giving her quite a extensive knowledge of object creation. Her “fossil” project began with the desire to preserve a sentimental bouquets of flowers. Her process has now blossomed into a practice of creating beautifully adorned tiles. She takes cherished, perhaps fleeting, objects and allows them to exist eternally. Her work is created with a fairly basic form of casting, yet allows her to capture delicate and intricate details. She learned the process from a glass blowing class in art college, during which she was told to press shapes into wet sand and pour molten glass over the impression. After that, she began experimenting with clay, plaster and paint, and found her way to the tile making process she uses today. Each of the molds she creates can only be used once, and therefore each piece is a unique, personalized object. Her work is undoubtedly graceful, and in a slight sense, almost whimsical. The process of casting has a long history, and despite her creating in the preset, her objects tend to feel as if they have come from a deep rooted past, truly capturing the feel of being a “fossil.” (via deMilked)

Engineer Zachary Abel Creates Complex Geometrical Sculptures Out Of Office Supplies And Other Household Items

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His passion for mathematics has led Zachary Abel to create geometric, science inspired sculptures made out of random elements. Paper clips, binder clips, playing cards and toothpicks are assembled according to specific formulas.

From far, the round sculptures appear uncomplicated to achieve. In actuality, Zachary Abel uses small needle-nose pliers and a schematic layout. For the Impenetraball project, the ball is comprised of 132 binder clips. The round form is obtained by assembling the binder clips one by one following a flat pattern in order to get a hollow centre and a filled surface. The designs have been so popular the talented engineer had to make a guide on how to construct the binder clip ball on his blog.

Zachary Abel in his Mathematical sculptures series is willing to share his enthusiasm for maths; replacing paint and brushes with pliers and patience. ‘Geometry in particular fascinates me, and I delight in discovering hidden patterns even in the most mundane of objects.’