Street Artist Hula Takes A Break From The City To Paint Hyper-Realistic Women’s Portraits In The Middle Of Water

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Hula balances his paddle board on the water the same way he balances the hyper-realistic paintings of women he depicts above the surface of that same water. The artist chooses abandoned sites and approaches the walls of his future murals by paddling on his surf board and carefully bringing his paint and brushes along with him.

Sean Yoro, a.k.a. Hula, represents women gracefully enjoying the contact of the water. The colors used are natural, dissolving with the stone color tones of the murals and the grey/green tones of the water. Geometric pastel signs are drawn onto the naked parts of their bodies such as the neck, shoulders and arms. The rest of their bodies is covered with water as Hula depicts only the top parts of the women’s bodies. The reflection of the pictures onto the surface of the water creates a double image, accentuating the peaceful and intimate moments caught by the artist.

Hula captures the smiles of pleasure and well being the women are experiencing in hidden places. Leaving the viewer wondering who these women are and if they even exist. Away from the city of New York, with nothing but his paint and his women, the moments spent scouting locations and painting in solitude in the middle of nowhere confers a meditative break to the artist.

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Cayce Zavaglia’s Portraits Appear As Hyper-Realist Paintings When They are In Fact Detailed Embroideries

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Portrait paintings or portrait embroideries? Cayce Zavaglia wants us to wonder and question the technique she is using. ‘About-Face’ is actually a series of embroideries. And they depict exclusively the artist’s close friends and family members. When flipped around, the portraits become abstract art pieces. “an attempt to show both sides…in hopes of initiating a dialogue about the two sides we each possess: the presented and the private self.’

As a former painter Cayce Zavaglia knows the impact of a brushstroke on the canvas and is therefore able to meticulously transfer the effect onto the tapestries. She begins the process by roughly taking a hundred pictures of her futur subject. She wants to catch the right expression. After selecting just one picture she starts working with one-ply embroidery thread on Belgian linen. She is able to render via fabric and thread the intricate details of blended colors and the texture that imitates oil painting.

The artists wants to create a dialogue between the viewer, the subject and herself. From far, the viewer might perceive the hyper-realist portraits as paintings and that’s ok. Up-close, they realize the mean used is embroidery. And by looking at the reverse side of the piece the viewers can begin to connect with the subject. The back of tapestries were historically never shown to the public. Cayce Zavaglia is making an exception. Because abstraction blurs the boundaries between the viewer and the art piece he/she is looking at and that’s when the dialogue begins to become interesting.

Cayce Zavaglia’s work will be displayed at Lyonswier Gallery in New York from November 5th until December 6th 2015. The artist’s daily process is updated on her Instagram account.

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The Largest Group Of Works By Hieronymus Bosch To Be Exhibited Together In The Netherlands

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A fairy tale, the garden of Eden and Hell. Hieronymus Bosch was a painter (ca. 1450 to 1516) from the Medieval era representing fantasy landscapes with imaginary and bizarre characters. In one of his most famous painting, ‘The Garden of Earthly Delights’ he depicts in a triptych, a multitude of religious symbols blended with amusing dark isolated little scenes.

Hieronymus Bosch’s style is childlike and at the same time stern and serious. On the left side of the triptych, a religious scene. G.od is presenting Eve to Adam in the quiet and peaceful garden of Eden. What is looking like a traditional scene seems in fact to represent the beginning of life and its debauchery. The following part of the painting shows the consequences of a story we know too well nowadays. That is, the story of Adam eating the forbidden fruit and sent with Eve to another land. A land where nothing is in order. Birds and fruits are bigger than humans and seem to have dominated. The animals are feeding the humans. Which, from the look on their faces, are acting like zombies. We are looking at submissive and obedient individuals satisfying their primal needs, mating and eating. The last part of the triptych depicts macabre and violent scenes. The decline of corruption through the representation of hell. People are being tortured and murdered by the animals and other hybrid creatures. Knives, swords and arrows are completing the disastrous landscape.

The set of paintings is ultra-detailed and furthermore for an artist living in the Medieval era. This looks from afar like a tale for children. The naive colors and the rounded shapes makes the art piece easy to watch. That was probably the first intent. The second was to maybe address a message indirectly to the viewers. The story of Adam and Eve disobeying from their original paths and its inevitable deadly consequences is shown to the public. The context of the paintings are unsure but what is unquestionable is the talent, vision and beautiful imagination of Hieronymus Bosch.

The triptych, 20 paintings and 19 drawings, will be displayed at Noordbrabants Museum in the Netherlands as part of the ‘Hieronymus Bosch: Visions of a Genius’ exhibition from February 13th to May 8th 2016. (via Juxtapoz)

Glenn Brown’s Incredibly Flat Paintings Look As If They Are Covered In Thick And Gooey Paint

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brown_GB145_DeepThr.tifPaintings by Glenn Brown are literally a blend of art references and a contemporary vision. Gloomy in the choice of subjects and bizarre in the colors used, the pictures resemble mutant depictions of grotesque figures.

Glenn Brown has a unique technique. He borrows images from subjects that have already been painted by masters such as Salvador Dali, Frank Auerbach, Rembrandt and unknown artists of mass market science fiction paperbacks. Taking his subjects directly from books or the internet, he then digitally retouches the features of the characters. Using Photoshop, he enlarges, crops and makes the necessary changes on the details he feels will give another outlook from the original version.
Paint is then applied to the altered picture. The artist’s brush strokes are thin and swirling on the canvas, creating a flat surface with a ‘trompe l’oeil’ effect. Glenn Brown exaggerates the flesh tones which counteracts with the kitsch color scheme. The rendering is wild and singular.

The artist is fascinated with the transformation of a reproduced picture. He is channeling new emotions from a subject that has already created previous sensations. Although his method has been used in the past by renown painters such as Picasso with the Velasquez’s Las Meninas, he is the only one who is impacting the original pieces he is working with. The soul of the paintings is dark and willing to connect with another dream world which, according to Glenn Brown would be welcoming different layers of unconscious fantasies.

Glenn Brown’s work is currently displayed in the piano room at the Brown’s Hotel in London until October 2015. A display curated by Gagosian Gallery representing the artist.

Artsist Ana Teresa Fernández Uses Paint To Erase The U.S. And Mexican Border

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Mexican born artist Ana Teresa Fernández “erased” a portion of the U.S. and Mexican border. Using a fifteen foot ladder, a spray paint gun and a generator, she painted a portion of the metal wall that separates Playas de Tijuana and San Diego’s Border Field State Park. By applying a powder blue paint, Ana Teresa Fernández was able to create the illusion that some of the border had disappeared into the sky. During her performance she wore a  “little black dress,” representing the Mexican tradition of “luto,” which is to wear all black for one year during a period of mourning. This act is the artist paying homage to the hundreds of thousands of people who have lost their lives attempting to cross the border, getting to the true heart of the matter. Border patrol between the United States and Mexico has been a controversial topic for decades. Depending on which side of the border you are on, the large metal wall means something drastically different. For many Mexicans, the border represents being kept from opportunities and the ability to have access to a better life. Despite the project having nothing but optimistic intentions, the artist did face some objection. In the middle of painting, Ana Teresa Fernández was stopped by the police who attempted to arrested her. However, after a half an hour of explaining her concept, she was let go.  Following the projects completion the artist received hate mail and was called a “Mexican terrorist.” She believes her project is feared because it “re-contextualizes a possibility” of peaceful coexistence.

James Charles Transforms Dollar Bills Into Witty And Pop Inspired Art Pieces

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James Charles, pop culture and dollar bills. A strange combination for an astonishing result. The artist transforms traditional portraits on bills into random movie characters, singers and artists. He only uses ink and paint to trace and re-write on the bills. The result is witty and fun to watch.

It all started out with random doodling on a couple of dollar bills. James Charles was not even aware of the treasure he was carrying in his pocket as he was spending the bills. He therefore decided to store them in a magazine, using it as a safe. The more he drew, the larger the magazine got.
The mutant bills have their president’s faces changed into male and female pop culture inspired characters. James Charles added a script below the faces, naming or giving hints in case we miss them.
Yoda, Einstein, Mister T, Willy Wonka, Princess Leia, Spock, Iggy Pop, Kiss and many others are altering the seriousness of the symbolic of money.

The artist drew on 5 dollar bills as well as on 100 dollar bills. The value of money is put aside here to focus on the true meaning of a paper bill components: paper and ink. So little and meaningless elements for such tremendous stakes. By associating easy recognizable pop features, James Charles is aiming to reach the mass. He has done it again more recently in Monstro Eyegasmica, a mix of popular iconographies such as The Kiss by Klimt or the use of sarcasm with some of the Disney characters. A series of paintings and collages blending pop culture and vibrant colored characters.

James Charles’ Monstro Eyegasmica series will be displayed at the Joseph Gross Gallery in New York until November 25th 2015.

Ashley Eliza Williams’ Ethereal Geological Paintings Of Human Emotions

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Colorado based artist, Ashley Eliza Williams, creates paintings of geological phenomenons. At first glance, her images appear to be the findings of a microscope, or perhaps, the photographic documentation of some obscure landscape. Her paintings are vibrantly alien, yet convincingly recognizable. Through a “lifelong curiosity about the patterns and biological systems that organize the natural world” she has created a body of work that seems to exist between the realms of science fiction and genuine morphology.

Her choice of titles lift her paintings out of a solely biological and ecological fueled quandary and shift them into a metaphorical, self-reflective, meditative space. The series itself is titled Sentient, directly opening up the work to a channel of emotional conversation, each piece taking the sentiment a little further. For example; The Inner Balance of Things, which features a delicately faded pink rock floating through a soft clouded sky; The Appearance of Quiet Restraint, which focuses on a triumphant looking boulder with small, seemingly measly mountains in the background; or Maybe We Look Like This Inside, which displays a fleshy, internal-organ-esque looking rock hovering over an empty, gray landscape. These titles add a very honest, almost painfully personal aspect to the work, hinting that these pieces act as depictions of an internal space; it is as if she is allowing the viewer into her most personal contemplative thoughts. Through pairing each painting to titles such as these, Ashley Eliza Williams proves her work to be a genuine thoughtful reflection on being human. (Via Booooooom)

Jean-Pierre Roy Paints Giants In Alien Wastelands To Deconstruct The Known World

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Jean-Pierre Roy is a New York-based artist who paints surreal scenes that deconstruct the known world. His work is often associated with science fiction, depicting alien wastelands inhabited by colossal humanoid beings, their bodies laden with geometric shapes, holographic projections, and mirrored panes. Their behaviors are likewise strange; wearing modern clothing, they loom against empty horizons, their faces splintered into expressionless shapes. Many of them appear contemplative, or even violent, pulling the clothes off prone bodies and engaged in silent feuds.

Rather than ascribing to science fiction specifically, however, Roy is more interested in fostering a critical, creative space that allows us to examine the systems of knowledge that construct reality. He strives to explore what he identifies as “the pull of the fantastical”—that moment when “your existential understanding of the nature of things will be questioned.” (Source) By making the earth unearthly, by depicting the self in unexplained contexts, and by crossing the beautiful with the unknown, Roy’s work provides fascinating visions of immaterial and cosmic worlds. (Via Trendland)