Van Orton Design Creates Retro Inspired Movie Posters Of Cult Film Classics

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Van Orton Design has recreated cult classic movie posters as vibrant digital works of art. The team is a creative collaboration of twin brothers from Turin, Italy. Using digital illustration tools, the brothers have created stained-glass reminiscent, 1970s retro themed images that are unbelievably elaborate and profoundly structured. Each poster is formulated by using the classic “one point perspective.” This is a a formula used by old masters that organizes an entire image based on a single vanishing point in the center. Every line is aimed to draw attention to the exact middle of the work — perfecting it’s perspective while simultaneously controlling the viewer’s eye. The posters portray a familiar scene from each film. The series ranges from new classics to older cult epics including The Shining, The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou, Pulp Fiction, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Young Frankenstein, Knight Rider, Deep Red, Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade, The Legend Of Zelda, Big Trouble in Little China, Brazil, and others of the likes. Their style is simultaneously unique and archetypically vintage. The use of loud color and clever hue pairing scream out for attention without being overbearing or overtly overwhelming. Van Orton Design‘s work hits the mark of what any good movie poster should achieve; they both embody and generate excitement for every single film. The duo have created something truly collectable and and absolutely fun. (via designboom)

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Kristen Liu-Wong’s Bizarre Paintings Of A Humorous And Disturbing World

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Kristen Liu-Wong is a Los-Angeles artist who paints darkly humorous and bizarre scenarios—ones that often involve violence and/or human depravity. The bright colors and cartoonish figures are initially misleading; look closer into her grotesque doll house of images and you’ll see people decapitated, vomiting, and performing sexual acts. It’s a bit like the Sims on bad acid; people stand around in ordinary-looking rooms while engaging in absurd (and placidly horrific) situations. It’s all in good humor, however; Liu-Wong’s characters smile diabolically and carry on, no matter what mayhem is occurring around them. She also paints still-life-like images with the same surreal edge.

Liu-Wong draws her inspiration from a variety of styles, ranging from American folk art to Japanese paintings to 90s “lowbrow” artists. She cites Clare Rojas as a main source of inspiration (Source). Her subject matter—a figurative representation of the world and human behavior—is a product of her vivid imagination. Visit her website, Tumblr, and Instagram for more high-energy and detailed scenarios that will leave you amused and guessing. There is an interview with the artist available on Pacific Dissent. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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A Series Of Distorted And Realistic Portraits That Appear Confusing And Uncanny At First Glance

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In Lee Griggs’ pictures, each face has a different shape yet the same human features. The Madrid-based artist is playing with distorted skin and exaggerated stretches by using 3D scans. He is a digital sculptor not afraid to shock. The renderings appear bizarre yet close to reality and open the door to multiple interrogations. 

The artist creates his faces by using Arnold for Maya, a program allowing subjects to be twisted and contorted digitally. In his series ‘Deformations’ he uses Maya to deform and Arnold to apply shade and light. The purpose of Lee Griggs is only empirical. Never knowing where his experiments on his software will lead him; he keeps on adjusting, erasing and reapplying the tools on the portraits indefinitely. 

The final result is intriguing, the features of the faces are kept as close to reality as possible. The wrinkles, eyebrows, expression of the eyes and the skin tone remain intact. But the character’s expressions are dead serious. The duality between the exaggeration of the faces’ shapes and the stern looks demonstrate the artist’s will to communicate irony and to question the meaning of norms. By creating realistic looking anamorphic portraits Lee Griggs creates a space for introspection. (via Sweet Station)

Travis Durden Reimagines Star Wars Characters As Greek Statues

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French artist Travis Durden has created Star Wars inspired classical statues. Using digital technology, the artist has sculpted characters in faux marble with faces pulled directly from the film’s franchise and bodies sourced from classical statues found in the Louvre in Paris. His work shines light on what could be interpreted as a softer side of the sci-fi fantasy film’s cast. Darth Vadar is fashioned with a soft lock of hair and a tender hand gesture that suggests grace. Boba Fett is portrayed gently bending down, showing signs of what might be humility. Yoda is depicted as a peaceful cherub. A Storm Trooper is shown in robes holding a piece of ancient knowledge. General Grievous dramatically reaches for a bow and arrow. Durden is interested in binaries and creating new meaning from merging seemingly opposing forces. Even his name, Travis Durden, is a pseudonym created from combining names taken from two of his favorite films. He uses the format of the classical sculpture to re-fashion these Star Wars characters to be depicted almost as gods — as equally a significant part of cultural history. Durden’s sculptures seem to suggest that cultural icons have indeed become objects of worship. Will the characters of Star Wars have that same type of precedence as we see the Greek statues to those in the future?

Traxis Durden’s work is a part of an all Star Wars themed exhibition titled “Contre Attaque” featured at Galerie Sakura in Paris.

Go Monster Project- An International Cast of Artists Bring Kids Wacky Monster Drawings To Life

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Frightening monsters, gentle monsters and funny monsters. The kids and artists working on the monster themed project  ‘Go Monster Project’ welcome any kind of creatures. This project raises awareness for children’s imagination as a mean to shape their adult personality and future.

Elementary students are asked to draw a monster, that’s the starting point of the project. No rules or conditions have been set. They are asked to let their imagination wander and to draw literally anything that comes through their minds. Once they are done, the drawings are transformed into paintings, 3D illustrations, animations; digitally or manually by mini-sculptures. The kids are able to see their creatures come to life, and most importantly they are getting the validation that their creativity, taste and talent is significant.

There’s no right or wrong. The fact that they won’t be graded or judged from their creations help the children recognize the power of their imagination. This project aims to encourage kids to grow their potential within an environment ruled by ‘like’ buttons and a permanent search for social approval.
The excitement shared is twofold. The kids are having a great time drawing and the artists are exploring their imagination by taking over the simple yet creative drawings into visually elaborated and detailed designs.

The ‘Go Monster Project’ has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help develop the project.

Over 14,000 Illustrations From The French Revolution Depicting Battalions, Guillotines And Royal Satires Are Now Available Online

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Printed cards illustrating French Revolution scenes. These and another 14,000  illustrations were made available on the French Revolution Digital Archive thanks to the collaboration between Stanford University and the French National Library (Bibliothèque Nationale de France). It’s a mix of caricatures of revolutionary vilains and heroes, key symbols such as the ‘guillotine’ and documents as serious as parliamentary deliberations.

It took several years to bring together the multitude of documents which are now grouped at the French Revolution Digital Archive. It’s been divided into two categories: Parliamentary Archives and French Revolution images dating from 1789.
The data is easily searchable by either random intellectuals or passionate historian. The documents browsed on the site take the form of prints, medals, coins and other elements.

When they don’t represent guillotines instruments or costumes of the time in total seriousness, the illustrations as colorful and amusing. In one of the cards for instance, the people of France, the ‘enemy’ are depicted as a multi-headed beast attacking the aristocracy and the battalion. White, blue and red, tones of the French flag, are mainly used to color the hand drawn cards. A constant reminder, despite the satirical drawings, of the omnipresence and importance of French patriotism at that time.

More illustrations are available on the French Revolution Digital Archive. (via HyperAllergic)

Frances Waite Turns Strangers Nude Selfies Into Playful And Empowering Illustrations

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It was a unique call for submissions: “Please send me your best nudes so I can draw them while I figure out my next move.” Seeking inspiration, Brooklyn-based artist Frances Waite posted this message on her Instagram, along with her phone number. Men and women responded enthusiastically, sending her intimate nude selfies of themselves sprawling on beds and squatting over mirrors. Choosing the images she found especially playful and unique—or rather, the nudes “where people [were] being themselves and posing in a way they [thought was] sexy and beautiful”—Waite began recreating them as illustrations, translating mischief and bodily expression into skillfully-drawn portraits (Source). The result is a fun, provoking, and ongoing series titled NUDES.

Waites’ project is one of empowerment, seeking self-expression beyond voyeurism, objectification, and the boundaries of heteronormativity. “I do think that I give people an opportunity to perform a part of themselves they might not display otherwise,” she explains in an interview with The Creators Project. “I’m some weird girl on the internet that wants to draw naked strangers, and I already have a repertoire of images that, I hope, make people feel comfortable doing whatever the hell they want.” (Source) She seeks to create a safe space where people can celebrate their bodies and sexual identities with agency and anonymity.

You can learn more on Waite’s website and Instagram. She has also put out a call on Tinder. Waite currently works from ASH LIC Art & Space, an interdisciplinary studio. (Via The Creators Project)

Flora Borsi “Distouches” Portraits Of Fashion Models Creating Surrealist “Little Monsters”

Hungarian photographer Flora Borsi digitally “distouches” images of models. After analyzing fashion portraits, the artist took note of the overt emphasis on perfection the images took. She then decided to play with the process to perfect by attempting the opposite. Her images wink to the classic artist portrait, perhaps even take their composition from what looks like could be a model or actor’s headshot, yet instead of aiming to portray women at their most beautiful, her mission was to create something truly unusual. Her portraits highlight distorted faces of women that tend to have three eyes, peculiar brow lines, and lips that droop, giving an almost absent chin. With a thread of shiny hair and dramatic lighting, this body of work almost acts as a portrait series of genuine alien beings. The artist explains the project in her own words:

“In this project I’ve been analyzing some fashion portraits, how perfect they are. So I made the opposite of retouching, somehow I distouched these pictures of perfect models. This project is connected to surrealist painters point of view: beauty wasn’t enough to give me interest. I love imperfections as much as I love surrealism. These pictures are my little monsters, no one wants to look like them, because they are totally unique.”

Borsi’s work uses digital manipulation in order to explore her fascination with surrealism. She focuses on issues surrounding identity, relationships, emotions, and dreams with the aim to  investigate the complexity of the human psyche.