Matthias Jung’s Fantastically Collaged Buildings Are Not From This World

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA On the way to Kamtchatka Zonenrandgebiet

Collage has fascinated artist Matthias Jung since he was a child when he built his first fantastical buildings in his father’s photo lab. Not much has changed since then, and he still cut aparts photos to make them into new scenes. He doesn’t want help from digital technology in his artwork, and doesn’t use Photoshop.

Jung explains why he focuses on structures, writing:

I am always amazed at how architectural details can evoke certain associations and feelings. This is how a latticed window conveys coziness; one might even say it is soulful. Framework is soothing, sometimes touching. Antennas have something sinister about them. They point to something outside the picture. Concrete is cold and foreign – but maybe interesting for just that reason.

He began with the series Houses in January 2015, and developed seven complex images within a few weeks. “All the images used have been photographed by me,” he explains. “Many were taken during trips in northeastern Germany. My last trip took me to the Ruhr region where there are abandoned steel mills and heaps of coal. I find that to be very exciting.

Matthis says that his dreams are collages, and that for them to “function properly,” he also has to consider design rules.

Thus, the relationship between order/disorder and homogeneity/diversity must agree. A building has to first be stable and credible before I can add some “disorder,” to let it fly for example. One such disorder refers to another, only hinting at reality. I weave, so to speak, spiritual realities into everyday things.

 

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Micaela Lattanzio’s Photo Mosaics Shatter Portraits Into Bits And Pieces

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mosaic photo mosaic Micaela Lattanzio - Mixed Media

Micaela Lattanzio creates works of art that go beyond the traditional forms of photography. This collection, called “Frammentazioni,” shatters photos into bits and pieces, enabling Lattanzio to play with space and texture. Her mosaic-esque pieces contain a sort of kinetic energy, suggesting form and movement in a subtle way.

Like other types of art that use human features, it’s hard not to assign emotion to Lattanzio’s work. She literally uses human images as jig saw pieces, evoking a sort of psychological depth that could be read as anxious or even playful.

Some of Lattanzio’s works are use the various pieces of photographs as pixels, rearranging them around each other but maintaining some semblance of the original shape. Other pieces lace together long stripes, looking like the result of two inkjet printers communing  (via Hi-Fructose)

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Javier Galindo Questions The Idea Of Mementos By Altering Classical Antiquities

Javier Galindo - Cast Resin

Javier Galindo - Paint on Found Plaster

Javier Galindo - Cast Resin

Javier Galindo - Painted, Found Ceramic Set Into Cast Resin

Javier Galindo, an artist of many talents, uses ready-made objects to create an interesting narrative that comments on possessions we value. By nature, humans are collectors. So much so, that we even have an entire T.V. series dedicated to this hoarder phenomenon. In Galindo’s series The Incomplete Tour, he creates objects that mimic, question, and alter keepsakes and mementos often collected by travelers and tourists. Specifically, he references “The Grand Tour,” a trip that many youth would take during the 18th century across Europe. The purpose of this journey was to gain knowledge of the Western world’s cultural history and to be exposed to its many treasures, such as classical antiquity. To preserve their memories, as we often do today, they would collect souvenirs. Galindo’s question is, what is this memento actually worth? It is by no means an original; it is just a fragment or a trace of what was experienced.

Influenced by classic antiquities, Galindo’s series transforms and skews these fractures of remembered treasures. The series is comprised of a wide variety of mediums including cast plaster and oil paint, as it also is included two-dimensional and three -dimensional works. Focusing on portraiture, the once traditional portraits and busts are now sliced and stacked, skewed by paint, or literally cut out of their frame. In a world where we are obsessed with documenting every moment through digital photos, it is interesting to see a reference to a time where the only way to keep the moment with you, was through collecting physical souvenirs. A photograph is like a still memory, a fragment of an event that can often warp the true memory. Just like a photograph, Galindo’s mementos are just fragments of the whole; they are hints of a narrative further skewed by Galindo’s artistic eye.

Oddly Head Reimagines Iconic Hollywood Scenes By Adding A Dark Twist

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London-based artist Oddly Headdepicts classic films in his series titled Hollywoodland, but it’s all with a dark(er) twist. Using iconic scenes and images from the likes of Poltergeist, Jaws, and The Wizard of Oz, he interjects different narratives. The drowned Statue of Liberty in Planet of the Apes is still but in Oddly Head’s telling it overlooks happy beach-goers. Likewise, celebrity Simon Cowell’s face appears on the Poltergeist TV rather than its original eerie glow.

By stripping the shocking/memorable parts of the original scenes, Oddly Head takes some luster away from Hollywood. Instead, he’s made them seem trivial, silly, and completely changes the tone. Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music suffers a distressingly-painful fate and is hitched to crosses. This much more sinister than its mostly-cheerful tone. Singing in the Rain also has the same treatment. As Gene Kelly belts out his the lyrics, a homeless man sleeps next to a graffitied door. Hollywoodland is part absurd and part amusing, and will definitely make you look at these films in a different light.

If you enjoy Oddly Head’s work, check out his intricate prints made from thousands of tiny vintage images.

Kevin Dowd’s Nostalgic Photo Collages Depict The Impossible

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Kevin Dowd creates photo collages that examine the familiar in surreal environments. An amusement park ride is suspended in mid-air; the lonely peak of a roller coaster ride frames a mysterious moon. His artwork resonates with emotional meaning, evoking feelings of uncertainty and isolation. By using the totems of our childhood — brightly colored balloons, swings, and theme park rides — Dowd also calls up a sense of unsettling nostalgia.

This is no coincidence. One of his collections is called Technostalgia: a pair of balloons tethered to a telephone pole, at odds with a wisp of cloud in the background that could either be coming or going. The artist’s intent is to examine “the nature of communication, the analogous methods of wired transmission, sound and even thought.”

Dowd is a thoughtful artist who has grand metaphorical meanings behind his work. Field Day: Ascent, the collage of children on swings rising into the sky, is meant to “capture sensations of awe and beauty, while recognizing the tentative nature of such experiences.” The photos of the roller coaster, named Babel I and Babel II, “explore the hubris of man.”

Whether or not the viewers grasp those exact interpretations, though, Dowd’s work still stirs up feelings of traveling to times and places long gone. (h/t I Need a Guide)

Elizabeth Zvonar’s Collages And Sculptures Contemplate The Body’s Sexualized Relationship With Advertising

Elizabeth Zvonar - Collage

“Legs”. Digital LightJet print of a hand-cut collage (2007).

Elizabeth Zvonar - Sculpture

“This A Way”. Porcelain, custom glaze. 4 finger casts, 14″ (2013).

Elizabeth Zvonar - Collage

“Tulip”. Digital LightJet print of a hand-cut collage (2010).

Elizabeth Zvonar - Sculpture

“Cummy Loubous” (detail). Porcelain, custom glaze. 8.5″ pair of Mary Jane-style stiletto shoes (2013).

Elizabeth Zvonar is a Canadian artist whose collages and sculptures encounter us as objects of curiosity and contemplation. Her choice of mediums is vast, including brass, stone, porcelain, and hand-cut collage, but no matter what she creates, Zvonar’s work is tied together by a consistent style that is tactfully sexual, critically engaged, and subtly humorous. Her motifs include multiplicities of disembodied hands and fingers, magazine cutouts juxtaposing seductive imagery with the silly or strange, and high-fashion objects (such as porcelain high heels) splattered with a suggestive, white glaze. These works grab our attention and activate our minds, and this is precisely their intention. As Zvonar expresses in a fascinating interview with Here and Elsewhere,

“I like to make things strange and interesting to look at in order to engage. My method is tied to how advertising operates. I tend to use sex blatantly or metaphorically, mimicking advertising strategies [and] pushing the image/concept/work into unfamiliar territory.”

In this process of defamiliarization, Zvonar’s works become perceptual exercises in the effects of familiar and manipulative advertising imagery — the types of images that, as Zvonar acutely points out, inundate our waking lives “should one have their eyes open when walking down a street or in line at a grocery store” (Source). By removing idealized bodies and coveted material objects from their usual, seductive contexts and reconfiguring them in a socially aware manner, Zvonar’s creations cleverly critique the way fashion media and advertising operate on us by fragmenting and sexualizing the body.

Check out Zvonar’s website for a larger collection of her works, including a list of past exhibitions. If you’d like to learn more about her artistic themes and creative processes, I highly recommend reading the interview conducted by Here and Everywhere.

Hilarious Tumblr Will Photoshop Your Bizarre Dreams

“I dreamt I passed my driving license on tricycle.”

“I dreamt I passed my driving license on tricycle.”

“I was sitting somewhere in Berlin surrounded by red and black cat and there were blonde men everywhere.”

“I was sitting somewhere in Berlin surrounded by red and black cat and there were blonde men everywhere.”

“I was riding a shark in the middle of the sea with Justin Bieber, we were smoking pot and having a good time, and it was raining skittles all over the sea.”

“I was riding a shark in the middle of the sea with Justin Bieber, we were smoking pot and having a good time, and it was raining skittles all over the sea.”

“Everyone was using Bing instead of Google at school. Also, everyone was walking on the ceilings.”

“Everyone was using Bing instead of Google at school. Also, everyone was walking on the ceilings.”

Here’s a hilarious Tumblr to follow. Photoshop Your Dreams is a blog that asks readers to submit their dreams have have them recreated in the photo-editing program. The person behind it is Margaux Espinasse, a web project manager based in Berlin. It’s an amusing premise and one that’s very relatable. Have you ever had a dream so vivid but hard (and boring) to explain in words? Here, the images look ridiculous and capture the often-crazy essence of this unconscious state.

Espinasse tells It’s Nice Thatthe inspiration for this project came from her own dreams. “I woke up three weeks ago after an amazing dream where I was chased by flying octopuses (probably because I watch a few too many Nat Geo and BBC documentaries),” she explains. “I tried to tell a friend about this dream and then I realised that the best way to communicate it was to make a montage of it.Photoshop Your Dreams caught on. “A few friends were quite excited by the idea and sent me their dreams. I put them online on Tumblr and very quickly I saw that people liked the idea.

Espinasse is taking submissions for the blog. Learn how to do so here. (Via It’s Nice That)

Hannalie Taute’s Embroiders Beautifully Fractured Portraits Stitched On Car Tires

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Using discarded inner tubes and a needle and thread, South African artist Hannalie Taute embroiders portraits onto rubber. She takes cuts the abandoned material and cuts them apart to stitch together and form a “canvas.” Often, this means that her subjects have a subtle honeycomb pattern as their backdrop. “Besides the durability and availability of rubber from inner tubes found in car tires, I also decided to embroider on rubber because I find the contrast of working with needle and thread on these inner tubes fascinating,” she says in an artist statement.

As you might imagine, rubber is a tough surface to embroider on. Every stitched line is shown, and Taute isn’t able to seamlessly blend together the different hues. The results are fractured areas of color that abstract her portraits, although not to the point of unrecognition. And, this is partially the idea – to subvert materials. The rubber’s coarse texture is offset by the delicate thread, but at the same time the thread can seem rough with its choppy arrangement.

The artist’s inspiration comes from a number of places, but boil down to identity. She writes:

Titles, words, phrases from books, music, stories, sayings and toys play an integral part in conveying meaning and biographical info about me as a mother, wife and artist in society.  Relationships between people and objects are something I prefer to explore using my chosen medium.

Taute’s work is currently on display at the Erdmann Contemporary Gallery in Capetown. Entitled Cross My Heart, it’s on view from now until March 30 of this year. (Via Jung Katz)