Kim Rugg Deconstructs Social Constructs By Dissecting Newspapers And Maps

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Artist Kim Rugg’s incredibly meticulous artwork consists of slicing up and breaking down everyday sources of information, like newspapers and maps. Dissecting newspapers, she rearranges the words and letters, creating a new depth of meaning. She often cuts the letters out and places them in alphabetical order, throwing the message in disarray. If these newspapers were real, they may cause panic and mayhem, as they disrupt our normal access to worldwide information. Can you imagine if even online news from all countries suddenly appeared as Rugg’s newspapers do? Both her surgically cut newspapers and transformed maps deconstruct society norms of information and the restrictions our culture has placed upon them, and therefore us as well.

This London-based artists slices up maps and pieces them together again backwards, or purposely arranging the once solid land mass in a way that fuses together all elements of land, border, and ocean. She also creates her maps by hand, erasing borderlines and geopolitical issues that are so relevant in today’s society. Her recreations of man-made territories display a new topography; a world with no boundaries, where we all can live with no territorial restrictions. Each carefully incision made forms a part of the whole, redirecting your view to its small details. Rugg’s complex work invited you to investigate the information laid out right in front of you that is often overlooked. Other work of her that require our close inspection to really understand her subtle manipulations include magazines, comic books, and even cereal boxes. Her work can be found at Mark Moore Gallery in Culver City, CA.

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Marco Gallotta’s Intricate Paper Cuts Portray People In Their Natural State

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New York-based artist Marco Gallotta uses paper cutting as a way to create intricate portraits that “portray people in their natural state.” A combination of linocuts, watercolor, and collages, the multilayered images feature frontal views of people who have decorative shapes masking their faces. Patterned flourishes, water-esque ripples, and clashing swirls appear front and center as they obscure any sort of realism and transform it into an abstract work of art.

Despite these different techniques and media, Gallotta brings them together in a harmonious way. Here, each layer seems to tell a different story. There’s often a photo beneath the artist’s hand cut work, but it’s what’s above it provides a conceptual look at who the subject is. It’s their essence, and these decorative adornments speaks to the complexities of who someone is – their perceived versus actual identity. (Via Lustik)

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Debit De Beau’s Whimsical Photo Collages Capture Emotion

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French artist Debit de Beau creates gorgeous photo collages that seem to inhabit their own world. With wide skies dwarfing tiny inhabitants, Beau’s artwork seems both expansive and a little lonely. 

Beau uses both illustration and textures, such cloth with raw edges, to liven up his collages. His landscapes meet at the intersection of the manmade and the natural world. A boy meets a whale just off a lighthouse’s shore, while a man walks his pet snail and considers a crossroads marked with all of life’s milestones: hope, loss, guilt, and success.

The emotional palette that Beau works with seems quite varied, his subjects by turn leaping joyfully off of a ferris wheel and pause, questioning a ladder that hangs from a lone window. The surreality of his collages aims to capture not a perfectly realistic scene but to cause emotional resonance, placing us in that person’s frame of mind. To climb or not to climb? Should I follow the snail? Or contemplate a quiet fall of rain? (via Optically Addicted)

Artist Myriam Dion Snips Into Newspapers To Capture Flickering Portals Of Light

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With the precision of an expert glass cutter Myriam Dion snips into the front pages of newspapers to produce an alternative look into current events. Her sharp tools create striking portals of light flickering through pieces of paper which have been crafted to produce a stained glass window or lacey embroidered effect. The dizzying number of cuts are similar to the marks a painter uses to create canvas.The negative space created from Dion’s labor enhances the grainy newsprint which turns more impressive when the paper’s color photographs are used. These resemble light and airy woodblock prints giving it an arts and crafts sensibility.

Dion has made several installations including a project which covered the windows of a government building in Montreal. It referenced the slatted arches seen in gothic style architecture commonly used in old churches each page filling the space with expertly cut and designed sheets. In another a waterfall effect of color newsprint photographs set in a line razored to resemble punctured curtains become a more conceptually minded piece when the paper’s residue is left behind.

Dion is a Canadian artist currently attending the University of Quebec. She first began creating this unusual work in an  attempt to reinterpret the state of print journalism. (via honestlywtf)

Peace Not War: Artist Replaces Soldiers Guns With Flowers

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Multi-media installation artist, video maker, designer and all-round talented guy Mister Blick has made some beautiful collages. Placing colorful flowers on old war time photos, in the place of where guns normally would be, he makes a sweet and subtle statement. Alluding to many different political actions in war time, his message is clear. Why do we continue to use force against one another?

The subject of his collages will resonate around the world, but perhaps more so in Portugal. On April 25, 1974, there was a military coup in Lisbon which is now known as the Carnation Revolution. When the population took to the streets to celebrate the end of the dictatorship, carnations were placed into the barrels of the soldiers’ guns, and placed on their uniforms. It is a classic example of how radical political and societal change can take place without the use of bullets.

Mister Blick’s images are a simple reminder of how quiet, gentle actions are usually the ones that end up heard the loudest. And it is a timely celebration of one of the most original revolutions in Europe, and in the world. Happy Freedom Day everybody! (Via Honestly WTF)

Stop And Smell The Roses: The Eclectic Flora Collages Of Anne Ten Donkelaar

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Spring is in full bloom in the work of Anne Ten Donkelaar, as she breathes new life into fragile shards of flora. Using photos of flowers, she collages together lush bouquets of plants in combinations that are unlike any you may find in the wild. Each bloom and root this Netherland based artist creates is mismatched with another. She even combines black and white nature photography with color, creating a striking affect. Donkelaar’s emphasis of the faint, subtle lines of the roots and stems moving through the composition beautifully compliment the flourishing flora. Her magical specimens are delicate and ethereal, as they seem to float in their frame. In fact, her work is suspended above the background by small pins, casting a contrasting shadow behind it.

“Weeds become poetry, each unique twig gets attention, nature seems to float.”

Donkelaar’s work shows off an eclectic assortment of plant types, as she displays cactus, succulents, and fungi amongst the layers and layers of wildflowers. The large variety of hue and color combined with the widely diverse nature in her work creates overwhelming visual detail and beauty that will have you searching through every leaf and pedal. The artist treats each piece with such love as to show the faint detail of each small bud that transforms and evolves into a new and thriving creation.

“By protecting these precious pieces under glass, I give the objects a second life and hope to inspire people to make up their own stories about them.”

Bozka Creates Enchanting Illustrations And Pop-Up Art Of Dream-Like Ecosystems

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Bozena Rydlewska (aka Bozka) is a Polish artist who creates enchanting nature illustrations blooming with life. Her works resemble dream-like visions of a fairytale forest: ornate plants burst and divide across the paper, creating patterns and symmetry; animals from different habitats (frogs, birds, and tropical fish) intermingle harmoniously. Bozka has turned some of her illustrations into mesmerizing 3D pop-ups, intricately layered and rich with illustrated texture. From bright, buzzing jungles to mysterious gardens at dusk, the vibrant color schemes give each ecosystem a unique energy.

For many of us, Bozka’s works may be attached to a sense of nostalgia; they remind us of those children’s books that engrossed our imaginations by springing to life as we turned the pages. Bozka has taken this art a bit further, of course, in the divine complexity of each piece. Some of her pop-ups resemble theater sets, like elaborate stagings celebrating the harmony and geometry of nature; we expect at any moment for the birds and butterflies to explode into a synchronous movement. Check out Bokza’s website and Facebook page for more imaginative creations. (Via Hi-Fructose)

Isobelle Ouzman Turns Discarded Books Into Sculptural Works Of Art

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Illustrator Isobelle Ouzman upcycles would-be discarded books into sculptural works of art. She cuts back the pages and draws nature scenes that together, create an alluring new narrative. The primarily black-and-white images have spots of color added to them, and they hearken the viewer into this special place.Ouzman calls her creations Altered Books.

Using an X-acto knife, Micron pens, watercolor paint, and a lot of love, Ouzman breathes new life into these objects. “Every book that I alter was found by a dumpster in Seattle, a recycling bin, a thrift store, or was given to me by someone who no longer wants it,” she writes. “Rather than have these discarded books sit out in the rain or in some store to gather dust, I’m striving to make good use of them. I love books very much and would never carve into one that was valuable. I just want to give them a new life and a second chance to mean something again.

Ouzman takes commissions on these Altered Books in her Etsy shop. (Via Hi Fructose)