Artist Peter Combe Creates Stunning 3D Portraits Using Paint Swatches From The Hardware Store

4.jpg 11939379_1638206819754400_1850549353_n 12139659_911928988881417_1461929145_n blue_eyed_sam_2015

Artist Peter Combe transforms household paint swatches to create stunning 3D portraits. Using the full color spectrum of 1,100 colors, the artist prepares his palette material by manipulating the swatches either into tiny discs by punching or miniature strips by shredding.  He often works in series of repetitions, allowing him to recreate the same image with the aim of experimentation. The potential of each renderings is endless as he uses color based on tonality and not on hue and can transform each work quite drastically depending on his choices. Combe is interested in “how the implementation of a single colour, when applied to a small incremental tonal range, can transform a work either subtly or substantially.”  His work, formulated through an intense and meticulous layering process, can be compared to a pointillistic method of translating color, tone, and space. His work is also reminiscent of early printers, xerox and copy machines, in which images are built through a separation of color, resolving the picture one hue at a time. Another aspect of the work, Combe explains, “is the constant change and flux that is mostly produced by the viewers changing vantage points, an effect that is difficult to imagine whilst not being present before the work. These artworks do not photographer well. It is Impossible to capture the kinetic element – an element whereby the viewer’s motion or movement dictates the artworks transformative component.” There is a notion of fleeting reality when experiencing the work— just as each portrait is in of itself physically fragile — each image, as it becomes manipulated through movement, light, and space, becomes precious, as the viewers’ experience of the work is consistently shifting, making every interaction with the work unique. 

Advertise here !!!

Georgia Russell Uses Her Scalpel On Images Of Naked Bodies To Bring Them To Life

Georgia-Russell- Sculpture 11_565x458 Georgia-Russell- Sculpture 5_565x462 Georgia-Russell- Sculpture 10_565x484 Georgia-Russell- Sculpture 4_565x885

A naked body lacerated by regular and organized cuts. The paper sculptures of Georgia Russell are full of expression and poetry. Using just her scalpel to create motion on two dimension pictures.

She collects magazines and newspapers. And browses flea markets to find books to cut. Originally from Scotland, she moved to France after graduating and that’s when she started tearing out books she found on the docks of the Seine in Paris. The artist found in the act of cutting that she was liberating the books from their sculptural forms. Humanizing and creating a connection between the books and the viewers.

Georgia Russell is drawing with her scalpel. The repetitive patterns she designs on the paper look like brisk brushstrokes. Blending with the background, creating texture mimicking feathers blown by an imaginary wind. She gives a voluptuous movement to the cutouts. Circles and waves are embracing the position of the naked bodies.
The artist thinks of cutting paper as a mean to express her feelings. A freedom of speech she uses to captures strong emotions into her pieces. The notion of destruction is omnipresent in her interpretation of the use of the scalpel. However, it’s a positive one. From an abandoned piece of paper and her scalpel, she transforms her turmoil into an organic and vibrant art piece. (via INAG)

Advertise here !!!

Brandon Muir’s Moving Collages Are What Nightmares Are Made Of

1446749999tumblr_nwt7osC4rr1qb2rcfo1_r2_5001446749998tumblr_nwapbvIvuq1qb2rcfo1_r1_500 1446749998tumblr_nwdr9vPmWF1qb2rcfo1_500 1446749998tumblr_nwk0lasE8F1qb2rcfo1_500

Artist Brandon Muir creates dark, creepy, digital collages. With creatures such as a vintage pilot whose nose seems to have been burned off, a smiling blue child with red melting eyes, and a boy with a mutated head including a third eye complete with tentacle arms, Brandon Muir’s potential patrons of hell are truly what nightmares are made of. They are reminiscent of The Twilight Zone meets The Munsters meets Basket Case (1982). They are undoubtedly demonic, however, the work also has this sense of playfulness (perhaps solely because they are displayed using the lighthearted platform of the GIF). Muir’s work has an of aura of jest, perhaps taking notes from the type of kitsch found in 1950s horror films. In his own words “[My] one intention with these animations is to ride the line between a disgusted cringe and a smooth chunky chuckle” (source). His process begins as any collage artist’s would — he collects images taken from magazines such as National Geographic and LIFE magazine. After he creates his more traditional collages, he then uses programs such as Photoshop and AfterEffects to formulate the digital rendering. By placing the work into a digital format, Muir allows himself to explore more complex textures, colors, and juxtapositions, creating striking images you can’t seem to get off your mind. (Via The Creators Project)

1446749999tumblr_nwlnza7geP1qb2rcfo1_500 1446749999tumblr_nwspbkcUZs1qb2rcfo1_500 1446749999tumblr_nwuu0diyIV1qb2rcfo1_500

 

Anne Lemanski Creates Quirky Sculptures Of Postmodern Animals

9a19e0d976318af48483a34ef29cf5951ea8390e212947605f2e9fe02731388a 2f61bdbf6a67de1fceabb7e7e2535ce2 7c76ed48fd9b2cb76b885e4488df0208

American artist Anne Lemanski creates quirky, conceptual sculptures of animals. She begins by creating a copper rod amateur which she then cuts, manipulates, and braises together to create what she refers to as a three dimensional line drawing. She then uses various materials, such as prints created from images of her own collages, leather, and vinyl. These works act as a further adaptation of her collage practice. Her sculpture aesthetic roots from images she has been familiar with for years. As the Alumna Artist-In-Residence at the McColl Center for Arts + Innocation in Charlotte, North Carolina, Anne Lemanski developed her practice between both her collage and sculptural elements, leading her to create her newest exhibition, Simulacra. As the artist moved between techniques of meditative cutting and pasting to the physicality of creating a structure, she began to realize that ultimately, despite the difference in the materiality of the work, what was creating was the simulation of animals. By creating a falsified “double” of something that is in fact real. Lemanski allows herself to enter the postmodern discourse of the notion of “simulacra,” a concept associated with French philosopher Jean Baudrillard. Within the philosopher’s work Simulacra and Simulation (1981), Baudrillard argues that by creating “copies,” society has replaced all meaning with mere symbols. Thus, the human experience has become hyper-real, as all meaning is just a simulation of what once was. Lemanski notes that her own practice replicates the same notion, as she creates the simulacrum of nature. She allows two dimensional imaging to become three dimensional. This process allows the viewer to then experience the simulated, while channeling the real.

Melissa Smyth Powerfully Juxtaposes Self Portraits, Bob Dylan Lyrics, And Texts From Her Rapist

screen_shot_2015-10-21_at_123430_pmscreen_shot_2015-10-21_at_123527_pm screen_shot_2015-10-21_at_123642_pm screen_shot_2015-10-21_at_123705_pm

Melissa Smyth’s photo series, Lay Lady Lay, portrays a set of eighteen self portraits taken with Fujifilm FP-100C instant film. Each picture is preluded by lines from Bob Dylan’s classic love song, Lay Lady Lay, and subtitled with text messages from her rapist. At first glance, her images seem like whimsical coming of age depictions of confused and painful love. Yet, while further committing to the work and understanding each image within its context, the series begins to unravel a intricate, subdued truth. There is a raw honesty that allows the viewer to enter into a realm of undeniable complexity. The work almost allows the viewer to follow a stream of psychosis and true disillusionment as he or she grasps the words written by the rapist. While entering back into the portraits, the viewer must then re-imagine those words not just from him, but then through her, who, despite being the victim, has been forced to address blame. There is a constant shift of consciousness in the work, truly getting to the heart of an endlessly difficult subject. Even further, Bob Dylan’s Lay Lady Lay,  allows her to illustrate another layer of convolution. When re-appropriated into this series, the love song begins to take on new meaning. Through the isolation of the lines, a subtle forcefulness is revealed, noting that there is a dark, perhaps unspoken, overlap between love and obsession.

Melissa Smyth‘s series acts as a genuine representation of a deeply complicated issue, that regrettably, is not uncommon and often not spoken about. She uses her work not only as a means to create a discourse on the topic, but also as a means for self recovery and empowerment. She states;

“I use photography to understand and express the ways in which looking and desiring can make an object of the body, and the ways in which images can be used to resist this. To photograph my own body allows me to not only reclaim control over my self-image, but also to comment upon the objectification that occurs though forceful violence and emotional manipulation. The project ultimately is not about my rapist’s actions, but about my strength and growth. I’ve been inspired by other survivors of sexual abuse and gender-based violence, and hope to add to the voices speaking in solidarity and in strength for all of our liberation.”

 

João Ruas Paints Arcane Scenes Of Dark Mythology And Mysterious Symbols

Joao Ruas - painting Joao Ruas - painting Joao Ruas - painting Joao Ruas - painting

João Ruas is a Brazilian visual artist who paints esoteric scenes of ghostly bodies and mysterious symbols. Each image appears to be filled with a chiaroscuro-like fog that dissolves form into shadow. Recurring motifs include animal skulls, red tattoos, and medieval weapons that drift amongst hooded figures and undead dogs. There is a sense of arcane mythology mixed with everyday banality, for intermingling with strange and ancient-looking objects are scissors, helmets, and electrical cords.

By unfolding layers of time and myth, Ruas’ paintings emit a deep emotional timbre, unsettling the soul with their dark scenes. A boy with what appears to be animal ears growing down his face evokes something akin to despair and alienation, while a blindfolded woman on the back of a red horse (a reference to Lady Godiva) emanates with vulnerability, fear, and strength. With mystifying combinations of symbols, Ruas’ paintings function like open tomes that can be inscribed with the viewer’s own imagination and spiritual significance.

Visit Ruas’ website, Tumblr, Instagram, and Facebook page to learn more. Click here to view a timelapse video of his painting “Escudo” (2014).

Meredith Woolnough Embroiders Complex Patterns Found In The Fragile Beauty Of Coral, Lily Pads, And Flower Petals

Meredith Woolnough - Embroidered ThreadMeredith Woolnough - Embroidered ThreadMeredith Woolnough - Embroidered ThreadMeredith Woolnough - Embroidered Thread

Australian artist Meredith Woolnough uses embroidery to create her delicate and intricate depictions of different plants. With some thread and a sewing machine, she forms different complex patterns found in nature, such as the veins of a leaf, patterns found in coral, and even lines and shapes found in red cabbage. Each fragile piece displays the small beauty found in the fine details of nature. What would be small, fragile beauty that the average person may overlook, Woolnough finds inspiration. Patterns from shells, petals, and lily pads are given new life in each breathtaking piece. The artist treats her artwork like specimens, as she carefully pins them under glass in shadow boxes for display.

Using vibrant colored thread, she builds up a density of embroidered patterns that become almost three-dimensional. In some cases, like in her embroidered bowls, the work really does have volume as it holds the shape of a bowl. Because of the method in which the artist creates her work, it demands an intense patience that can be seen as meditative. The repetitive patterns and natural quality of Woolnough’s work is like that of a Mandala, holding sacred qualities.

The work maps the frameworks of the various veining systems found in nature to create work that explores the balance, harmony and connectivity of life on Earth. Inspired by the patterns, structures and shapes found in plants, coral, cells and shells Meredith’s embroideries represent both the robust beauty and elegant fragility of life.

Nicola Samori Scratches The Surface Of His Dark And Intense Paintings To Unveil Previous Layers Of Work

Nicola Samori - Painting 1 Nicola Samori - Painting 2 Nicola Samori - Painting 3 Nicola Samori - Painting 7

The work of Nicola Samori depicts dying corpses and mysterious portraits scraped, scratched and torn on the surface, unveiling layers of contrasting paint. Dark and intense paintings, covering layers of existing work, like flesh covering the accumulation of past experiences and traumas. The artist chooses to damage his previous paintings on purpose. He feeds the canvas, daily; until the texture becomes ’intense and palpable’. Using his fingers or a knife to destroy the apparent layer, the result of what feels like a painful process is a magnificent harmonized agony. By scraping his paintings, Nicola Samori tries to search for true identity. A person’s face on a painting is not a valid representation of who this person really is. It doesn’t give a true essence of its inner personality and soul. Exploring what’s underneath the surface is the purpose of the artist.

Body, death and painting are, for Nicola Samori, subjects of obsession. By punishing the three altogether on the canvas, he opens the wound and sets himself free. His layered macabre creations are the structure for his catharsis (act or process of releasing a strong emotion into an art form or any extreme change in emotion that results in renewal and restoration).
Apart from the fact that the artist doesn’t fancy working with colors, according to him; the source of darkness does not reflect a state or a belonging; what is made from it is what’s interesting. A rough process symbolizing metamorphosis of deep emotions into meaningful and empowering art pieces

Nicola Samori’s work will be exhibited at Galerie Eigen+Art Leipzig in Berlin until September 2015. (via Empty Kingdom)