White Noise, The Digital Sculptures That Mixes Fashion Photography And 3D Animation

marie_05_04_marie-flipflop-wire_01 marie_05_black_4 snapshot09_0

Fashion photographer Per Zennstrom & 3D artist Torsten Weese collaborate on a multimedia project, White Noise Shores, that juxtaposes 3D technology with old-school photography in order to create sculpture compositions.

These beautiful shots resemble human bodies that mesh with what seems to be the digital fabric of what makes the basic 3D animation. The stunning compositions are strictly rendered in neutral colors and, at times, its vague composition is reminiscent of early abstraction (in that it is not fully abstract since it is somewhat figurative).

After the real-life photoshoot, the 40-50 still frames captured were uploaded into the free AutoDesk 123D Catch software which allows anyone with an internet connection to create real 3D models of virtually any object. The software stitches the images together and produces a 3D model in about 30 minutes.

The model acquired through the AutoDesk was then“sculpted by hand” in Sculptris to refine and enhance the digital sculpture. The next step was to hand the model over to Thorsten Japser Weese and his team at Recom-CGI for processing and editing. The camera flight and the rendering for the ANIMATION is done inf VRED professional and the passes were comped in NUKE and got little FX in After Effects. The team at Recom rendered a number of stills, video and 3D models which were then brought back to Per Zennstrom for final editing in Premiere and After Effects.

(via Eternal Optimist)

Advertise here !!!

Marcel Christ’s energetic photographs feature colorful powder explosions

MarcelChrist Powder7 MarcelChrist Powder6 Marcel Christ Powder5

Marcel Christ creates a series of photographs in which he tries to deviate from his usual commercial photographs. With clients like Sony, Nokia, Samsung, Evian and L’Oréal-Chirst is used to photographing still lives, essentially objects arranged in interesting and appealing but static ways. In his latest artistic series, Christ extends his modern, clean lighting and sense of composition (characteristics that resonate with his commercial photography), but takes it to the next level. Christ aims to transform what would be a static representations of colorful powders to something that is undeniably energetic- everything moves, jumps, and flies.

Christ succeeds at photographing unpredictable action. The powder’s movement and expansion are the main characters; they sporadically spread throughout the composition.

I think my work has some heritage from Dutch tradition, in its choice of props for instance – the vase. But different in its own way at the same time. Because it is not ‘still’ at all. It’s frozen in time, but very energetic in its appearance.

(via TreadHunter)

Advertise here !!!

Daniel Zvereff’s Stunning Photographs Of The Arctic Come In Unexpected Hues Of Violet,Red And Blue

DanielZvereff02

DanielZvereff10
DanielZvereff16

DanielZvereff03

Discontinued film stock has become an obsession amongst fine art photographers, and pretty much everyone else (at least the imitation of it even–think instagram filters). New York-based photographer Daniel Zvereff is no exception. In one of his recent series, Introspective,  Zvereff uses some of the last remaining supply of expired Kodak Aerochrome film in 120 format and takes it to the Arctic–a place as endangered as the film itself.

A travel journalist and photographer, Zvereff looks for the picturesque and the mundane- a good mixture of the two brings forth an interesting and stunning collection of photographs from all over the world- including the ones found here, which were taken in very remote parts of the Arctic.

The usage of the expired film showcases brilliantly unusual but beautifully colored mountains, graveyards, and highways in the brief, verdant Arctic summer are stained in otherworldly pinks and purples.

The now discontinued Aerochrome, was originally developed for the military to help them detect camouflage from helicopters: It responds the chlorophyll in plants and reverses green colors into lavenders and magentas and browns into deep blues.

“The Arctic will essentially be the next frontier for mining natural resources, and with a warming climate it’s safe to say it will soon be transformed as we know it, forever, It only seemed appropriate to photograph its incredible natural beauty using a film that is no longer in existence.”

(via FastCompany)

Joseph Marr’s Life-Size Sensual Sugar Sculptures

Joseph-Marr-7sugar sculptures sugar sculptures sugar sculptures

Australian artist Joseph Marr creates remarkable human-sized sculptures that are made out of sugar. The translucent candy-like texture gives the naked bodies a sensual feel and its color and whimsical appeal.  Marr colors the sculptures with ingredients like cola and raspberry fruit; don’t try eating them, though—most are protected by a layer of polyurethane.

Marr uses the delicious medium in order to convey that sexually charged aura that accompanies the stripped down sculptures. According to TreadHunter, the juxtaposition between the sugary syrup and the naked bodies represents the way that sexual relationships can be sweet and satisfying, but also the way in which people get themselves into sticky situations over lust and desire.

Sex sells and so does candy- the combination of both is bound to create extra appeal to the already wonderful creations.

Joseph Marr was born in 1979 in Australia and now lives and works in Berlin.(via Tread Hunter)

Ji Lee Disrupts Advertising By Sticking Clown Nose Stickers On Them

slide_341844_3530566_freeslide_341844_3530569_freeslide_341844_3530568_free

slide_341844_3530571_free

New York-based designer Ji Lee brings humor to mainstream street ads in NYC’s subway stations by covering the actors/models in the ad with removable stickers that look like red clown noses.

“Ads are definitely more fun with clowns in them, I believe everyone wins with this, especially the advertisers, because now they will get more looks to their ads than before.”

Lee looks to create temporary marks on these temporary public images. He takes on the job of ‘enhancing’ instead of ‘subtracting’ or ‘erasing’ the original image, which is by nature, a bit different than most types of vandalism.

“I live in NYC and I walk, bicycle or ride the subway everyday. There are lots of ads everywhere, so I wondered how I can make my commute little bit more fun for me and for everyone around by simply transforming these ads that have become so ubiquitous. When I place these stickers, people often laugh and give me a ‘thumb up’. I think people enjoy them.”

This isn’t Lee’s first foray into the world of creative street art projects. He’s also the brain behind “Mysterabbit,” the adorable urban invention that brought miniature rabbit statues to the streets of cities across the world. To check out more of Lee’s work, check out his site.(via HuffPost)

Kim Keever’s Stunning Photographs Turn Water Into Psychedelic Smoke

KimKeeverAbstractLiquids2 KimKeeverAbstractLiquids9 KimKeeverAbstractLiquids1 KimKeeverAbstractLiquids8

New York-based artist Kim Keever creates these abstract compositions by experimenting with colorful tinted paints and water. As a former thermal engineer for NASA projects, Keever tends to veer his work towards the scientific and experimental.

The beautiful, luscious and colorful forms are produced by the mixing and mingling of various amounts of color drops into water; as part of the process, the scientist-turned-artist documents the swirling liquids in hopes that something visually stunning happens in the midst of the experiment. Keever uses an enormous 200-gallon fish tank as the setting for much of his work; it, offers plenty of space and possibility for these stunning and unpredictable reactions to emerge.

These abstract formations are similar to Kevin Cooley’s Controlled Burns, a series of images that also explores the formations and movements of organic materials; although in his case the artist experiments with smoke and fire- which primarily leaves us with more natural color palette. While filled with bright, artificial hues, Keever’s creations still evoke images of breathtaking natural phenomena and earthy material (i.e quartz gemstones, stones, precious mineral stones, ocean tides,etc). (via My Modern Met)

Stunning Portraits Of Breast Cancer Survivors By Charise Isis

7.The_Empress Breast Cancer Survivors

12.Eponina Breast Cancer Survivors

6.Mater_et_Filia Breast Cancer Survivors

Charise Isis‘ Grace”, a series featuring portraits of women who are breast cancer survivors and have experienced Mastectomy Surgery, is a stunning compilation of images that simultaneously reinvents feminine beauty and inspires courage in women with similar experiences. The project’s process and presentation allows both subject and viewer to access a place of acceptance and beauty.

The photographic project is influenced by Hellenic sculpture (Greek). Its influence serves as a visual reference for the portraits; the draped cloths and the poses the women are photographed in are very indicative of the feminine portrayal in these hellenic sculptures (i.e “Venus De Milo” and “Nike of Samathrace”). According to the artist statement, the reference is also to implicate notions of  the survival, adoration, beauty  of old ‘artifacts’.

Furthermore, “Grace” is a continuation of the artist’s ongoing exploration of the feminine body and its perception of beauty in contemporary culture.

Pip&Pop Creates Miniature Worlds Made Out Of Pastel-Colored Candies

Pip&Pop

Pip&Pop

Pip&Pop

Pip&Pop

Nicole Andrijevic and Tanya Schultz, an Australian artist duo, Pip&Pop, collaborate to create delicious-looking installation in various galleries around the world. The constructions, intricately intalled in a gallery floor, is made out of colourful sweets mixed with glitter, beads, modelling clay, wax, polystyrene, wire, toys, sand, and other equally vibrant found objects.

This mini candy wonderland, a cartooonish looking maquette, is heavily influenced by Japanese pop culture.

“Throughout history there has been a long tradition of depicting journeys through, and in search of, imaginary lands and utopian worlds[…] the work draws on this rich history of other worlds as told through mythologies, Japanese folk tales, video games, cinema, children’s literature and ancient cosmologies.”

(Via Feather of Me and HuffPost)