Néle Azevedo’s Ice Figurines Melt In The Streets To Remind Viewers Of The Dangers Of Global Warming

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In 2009, Brazilian artist Néle Azevedo created 1000 men and women figurines made out of ice for the completion of her Public art installation, The Minimum Monument (Melting Men). Throughout its life in the outdoor space, the ice figurines slowly melted until their disappearance. Originally placed in Berlin’s Gendarmenmarkt Square, the piece was to bring awareness of Global Warming. Minimum Monument was then installed in Ireland as part of the Festival of Queens; there, the artist, recreated the original in order to visually remind people of the melting ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. Since then, the installation has travelled to many cities around the world and it remains internationally known as ‘climate-change art’.

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Johnson Tsang’s Surreal Sculptures Of Frightening Babies

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Honk Kong-based artist Johnson Tsang creates alternative ceramic creations that spook viewers. Employing a realist yet surreal sculptural technique, Tsang looks to produce exaggerated, almost cartoonish, bizarre human forms that look very convincing (and very disturbing). Besides his famous creepy, chubby, porcelain babies–whom he calls his own ‘children’–Tsang is known for his ability to morph both functional objects and the human body to put forth an alternative line of work that challenges the craft oriented world of ceramics. Much like Beccy Ridsdel Dissected Ceramics, Tsang has the ability to make ceramic pieces that in a way remain functional, but still work as a conceptual piece of art.

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Amy Friend’s Magical Re-Makes Of Vintage Photographs

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I employ materials and surroundings that are familiar to me using them as starting points for my investigations. These materials become the substance I use to inform the work I create. In my practice I tend to work within the medium of photography, however, I am not concerned with capturing a “concrete” reality. Instead, I aim to use photography as a medium that offers the possibility of exploring the relationship between what is visible and non-visible.

Alex. S. Maclean’s Aerial Photographs Of American Leisure Spots

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Boston based pilot and photographer Alex S. MacLean captures aerial images of playgrounds, parks, and other American leisure spots. The simple shots expose an interesting variety of colorful compositions that gather an almost abstract and often painterly representation of modern urban planning. His compositions are often unintentionally metaphorical and insightful, as their lively presence unofficially represent the types of things that these landscapes stand for: beautiful, fun, and often pleasurable places to be in and to look at.

“It really is about combining art and information. Some of it is sort of subliminal – you can’t quite put your finger on it but it sort of draws you in and engages you.”

(via FastCo Design and It’s Nice That)

Sara Landeta Drawings Of Birds Juxtaposes The Natural World With Prescription Medication Packaging

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Madrid-based artist Sara Landeta juxtaposes the natural world with the chemically engineered by using medicine boxes as her canvas to creates beautiful ornithological drawings inspired by the work of 19th-century artist John James Audubon.

By using the bird as her prime subject, the artist looks to explore the idea of freedom, or lack there of, in constricted and open spaces, and the notions of a natural world that is dependent on the synthetic to survive.

The progress on Landenta’s ongoing series can be seen through her Facebook page or on her personal blog. (via Steal Mag)

Maja Daniels Photographs The Surreal Resemblance Of Identical Twins

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Maja Daniels, a Swedish photographer based in London, compiled the series “Monette & Mady”, a photo collection of identical twin sisters, Monette and Mady.

Daniels approached the identical twins in 2010 after years of watching them from afar in the streets of Paris. The photographer was intrigued by their way of being and coexisting with each other. Neither Mady nor Monette have married or had children, they always eat the same kind of food in identical portions, they dress the same, and they move in similar ways. If they ever go out dressed in different outfits, people stop and ask why they argue- there is no room to be different from each other.

With the beauty of the Parisian sidewalks as her backdrop,Daniels shoots photos of the twins’ interactions and eerie resemblance. Some may look at the collection as a classy lookbook, others may find that there is something quite peculiar and surreal about their ways with each other. Many will wonder about the mysterious bonds between twin siblings.

This addition of fiction makes for a dreamy atmosphere, a bit like a mirage that reflects my initial impression of them. The streets of Paris make the perfect backdrop for such ambiguity to be played out, confusing us with its references to fashion, film and art. It makes the documenting of everyday events somewhat surreal.

 

Eilon Paz Photos Of Massive Record Collections

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Iranian photographer, Eilon Paz takes photographs of over 130 vinyl connoisseurs and their collections in the most intimate of environments, their record store rooms. Paz, a record collector himself, thought it might might be interesting to explore the people around him whose record collections are both larger and weirder than his own.The stunning, candid photos look at a variety of well-known vinyl champions as well as a glimpse into the collections of world-renowned and lesser-known DJs, producers, record dealers, and everyday enthusiasts.

In a 416-page coffee-table book, Dust and Grooves, Paz’s photographs are grouped together with compelling essays that closely examine the records and the people whom collect them. The book is divided into two main parts: the first features 250 full-page photos framed by captions and quotes, while the second consists of 12 full-length interviews that look deeper into the collectors’ personal histories and vinyl stories.

Tonya Corkey Creates Portraits Out Of Lint

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Canadian artist Tonya Corkey creates portraits made out of lint on canvas. Through her choice of material and subject, the artist looks to investigate an unavoidable aspect of human nature- precisely, the the need to collect memories and reconstruct the past. The series, “See You In the Future,” looks to further analyze this desire to recollect objects and moments of the past through a medium that encompasses the essence of loss and decay over time.

My work hybridizes the discarded material of lint with the second hand image – the iconic school photograph – to conceptualize my interests. Materiality conceptually layers the work. As a byproduct of society, lint consists of fibers, hair, dead skin and other debris, and thus directly referencing people and their daily activity. Lint and cast off photographs are both discarded materials – materials that reflect the idea of a decaying memory. Our desire for memory in absence is triggered by sensations of smell and touch, a trait of my work.

(via The Jealous Curator)