Florentijn Hofman’s Giant Sunbathing Bunny Sculpture

Florentijn Hofman-Sculpture Florentijn Hofman-Sculpture Florentijn Hofman-Sculpture

Florentijn Hofman, mostly known for her interactive, cutsey and giant sculptures of children’s toys (ie. Rubber Duck, Max), has created Sunbathing Hare, another eye-catching and adorable installation for everyone to find their inner child with, yet again. It was taken down yesterday Oct.13th, 2013 as it was part of the Netherlands Bilateral Year and the Russian public arts program and was only allowed to be on site for a few months.

With outstretched arms, the over-sized lazy creature suggests a lazy, happy pose, as it lays on the green grass of Hare Island near the St. Peter and St. Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg, Russia. It has contagious vibe; people lie and sit next to it with intentions to relax and forget about their problems for a moment.

Sunbathing Hare measured 15 meters long by 8 meters wide and 2.5 meters high. It was made out of plywood boards, a pink painted nose, eyes, and smile with a touch of charm and humorousness. (via designboom)

“My sculptures cause an uproar, astonishment and put a smile on your face. They give people a break from their daily routines. Passers-by stop in front of them, get off their bicycle and enter into conversation with other spectators. People are making contact with each other again. That is the effect of my sculptures in the public domain.”

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Selina Roman’s Burqa Project Offers Viewers Lateral Perspectives

Growth

Growth

Memories of Childhood

Memories of Childhood

Pink Float

Pink Float

The Burqa, full-body cover up worn primarily by Islamic women of faith, has been subject of much controversy for decades, especially in Western societies. Many say that the garment oppresses women, leaving them astray and without a voice in a world were men dominate them.

Selina Roman‘s Burqa Project takes the Burqa and turns its literal meaning around through the medium of photography and visual composition in order to challenge the viewer’s mainstream knowledge of it.

Roman, a former reporter, hopes to offer her audience a different view point, a new way of seeing, she comments on her artist statement.

Although the Burqa is shrouded in religious significance, I take it out of this context in an attempt to explore these other attributes. Instead of showcasing it as an oppressive garment, I place the Burqa in idyllic Florida landscapes to let it float and billow. In turn, it becomes an ephemeral and weightless object removed from its politicized context.

Apart from Roman’s obvious emphasis on the beauty and femininity that these garments project,  she also wants to shed light on the qualities that we often forget to acknowledge. There are many interesting characteristics that the Burqa provides to any that wears it- i.e anonymity, security, and power.

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Petros Chrisostomou’s Photographs Trick Your Sense Of Scale

Chrisostomou, Photography

Chrisostomou, Photography

Chrisostomou, Photography

Petros Chrisostomou, a New York based photographer, plays with scale, mass-produced and ephemeral objects, and hand-crafted mini architectural models in order to challenge the viewer’s visual certainties, and visual signifiers of contemporary mass culture.

The multi-faceted works resemble lively assemblages of what seem to be large-scaled mundane objects in exaggerated interiors – some resembling wreckage, and others referencing the extravagance of a Rococo palace.

Christosomou’s photographs become the field for mixing the high- and the low-brow, mass culture and genre painting, the luxurious and the expendable, as indications of social class distinctions. At the same time, the relations between the real and the imaginary in his oeuvre are a commentary on the mediated images of contemporary mass media that distort the natural and immediate dimension of our relation to reality, determining, among other things, the conditions for viewing and receiving art. 

The relevance of this body of work does not completely rely on its technical complexities, and cultural commentary, but also in its visual power. We know that the artist is not fabricating monumental sculptures resembling stiletto shoes, instead he is fabricating small-scaled architectural spaces- that play out with the objects, making them look bigger than they seem. It is important to notice, as curator Tina Pandi points out that “the alteration of scale and reversal of the relation between object and environment, between imaginary and real space.”

(Photos via Ignat Quotes via Artist’s Website)

Zanele Muholi Explores Representation Of Lesbian African Women

 Zanele Muholi

Katlego Mashiloane and Nosipho Lavuta, Ext. 2, Lakeside, Johannesburg 2007

Zanele Muholi photos

Nando Maphisa and Mpho Sibiya, Sasolburg, Johannesburg 2006

Zanele Muholi photography

Busi Mdaki and Malesedi Nthute, Katlehong, Johannesburg 2007

Zanele Muholi, a South African activist and visual artist, explores and re-imagines the intimate portrayal of the lives of black lesbian women in South Africa.

Moreover, Being, the title of this collection, according to Muholi, aims to question the construction of sexuality “and then [the] deconstruct of ourselves […] in order to see the parts that make up [the] whole.”

Black women and sexuality, in conjunction, have always been topics of heated conversation, as it not only refers to sexuality, but also a matter of colonialism and white patriarchy.

The artist is concerned with her sexual identity coming off as ‘un-African’ – perhaps a product of years of stigmatization on behalf of white colonialist and patriarchal societies, deeming the black female sexual identity as one that is hyper-sexualized and strictly heterosexual- or even then, the image of a black female to “reproduce” heterosexuality and white patriarchy.

Clarissa Bonet’s Somber Reconstructions Of The Urban Landscape

Clarissa Bonet

Clarissa Bonet Photography

Clarissa Bonet Photography 1

Everyone has a different perception of the city, to some it might feel luxurious and culturally rich, to others it might appear to be dirty and smelly, and to many natives, including Chicago based artist Clarissa Bonet, the city is this somber, anonymous, and emotionally charged space.

Bonet’s acclaimed on-going series, City Space, captures her personal perception of the urban landscape and its relationship to the ones that inhabit it.

“The Urban space is striking. Its tall and mysterious building, crowds of anonymous people, and endless seas of concrete constantly intrigue me,” the artist says.  

Her images are reconstructions of her perceptions/past experiences in the cityscape. Some may seem overly dramatic- as her play with lights and darks and muted colors, as she mentions in her artist statement on her website, are both visual strategies she is interested in working with.

On her artist statement, she also mentions that she reconstructs “the city as a stage to transform the physical space into a psychological one. The images […] do not represent a commonality of experience but instead prove a personal interpretation of the urban landscape.”

One of the most interesting elements in this body of work is her ability to transfer what would seem to be a mundane act on the streets to a scene that speaks of the human psyche, and emotion in general. Her subjects, most with their head down or covered, seem to purposely appear anonymous, giving the viewer a sense of them not being there, as they blend with the rest of the composition. Could this be cultural commentary/criticism on behalf of the artist? That is not out of the question, as these powerful and somber, yet beautiful images do make the viewer question contemporary living in the cityscape.

Photographs Reveal Before And After Transformations Of Drag Queens

Heidi Glum

Heidi Glum

Vivienne Pinay

Vivienne Pinay

Adriana LeGlam

Adriana LeGlam

Leland Bobbé, a New York based photographer, has compiled a series of stunning and complex images that further examine the drag queen persona, what it consist of, its controversies, and multifaceted physical aspects.His ongoing project, ‘Half-Drag . . . A Different Kind of Beauty’, has made a huge impact. Consequently, landing the photographer several awards and features in international art fairs.

The collection provides the viewer with an interesting perspective. These photographs, composed and stylized through the power of hair and makeup, are captured in one snap, and are not digitally composed- which is a lot to take on, knowing that the process could have been much easier having used Photoshop or other editing programs.

I think that Bobbé artistic choices say a lot about the points he is trying to convey with this collection of images. Moreover, there would only be this much vulnerability and honesty if the images were captured this way, and in this way only. Having his sitters pose with their two identities up-front and exposed is one hell of a statement. The sincerity, humble approach of the photographer and sitter alike, lets us in on the queens’ little secret and questions gender constructs, current law, human right initiatives and the possible lack-there-of.