Artist Duo Write And Draw Naughty Things All Over Your Grandmother’s Fine China

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Kris Aaron and Andy Walker are slightly modifying the purpose of fine China dishes. It’s now decorated with messages and gay illustrations. “Shit again”, “Cock monster”, “I’m going to fuck you” and pornographic images are hand drawn onto plates and kitsch ceramic ornaments. They either paint slogans or sexual images on small objets such as a tiger or a swan or desert plates. The couple just wanted to check “how cute it would be if they were more gay.” 

All the pieces in the Pansy Ass ceramics series are one of a kind. Already collectors of similar items, they redoubled their research in thrift shops and vintage flea markets to find the perfect antique China dishes for their collection. Their intention was to accentuate the kitsch side of plates and objects. “For instance, we have this swan that’s the gayest thing I’ve ever seen,” Aaron says, “and we thought it’d be funny if we painted ‘masc’ (like masculine) on it.” The result is a weird combination of classic patterns and graphic scenarios.

Ideally, the artists would want their embellished dishes to be displayed at Macy’s. From porno chic to porno kitsch there could a part of the market interested in inviting their grandmother to a fancy cucumber sandwich tea party. (via Lost At E Minor).

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3D Digital Creatures Designed To Repulse And Intrigue

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Colorful, textured creatures imagined by designers Andy Reisinger and Ezequiel Pini from The Six and Five Studio. The series called “Morbo” is a rendering of 3D printing and digital coloring. The result is bluffing. Easily mistaken for real existing sculptures or hyperrealistic paintings, the designers have had to explain themselves a lot about the disturbing aspect of their work.

Pushing the limits of art and design, the Argentinian duo Andy Reisinger and Ezequiel Pini like to explore the three dimensional world. Stranded on the beach after an apocalyptic episode, the creatures are found as they are presented to us. Raw, shapeless and twisted by the centrifugal force of nature, they mix elements which has nothing to do with each other. Hair, coral, gelatinous paste, plastic, porcelain and more are harmonized in objects that, in the end, make sense to the eye.

At first glance, the creatures seem ugly. Part of it is due to the fact that we can envision a living hairy animal coming out of it. Once the process of creation is understood, the look on it changes. The designers are interested in that shift. From unpleasant to attractive, our curiosity grows as we discover that these fantasy ‘things’ do not really exist. Leaving us wondering if beauty is better off restrained within our minds instead of being exposed out there. (via booooooom)

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Andrew Valko’s Astonishing Hyper Realistic Paintings Of Drive In Movie Theaters Will Take You Back In Time

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A drive in movie theater and its silver screen. The scene looks real: parked cars, dim-lights, sunset and in the background a celebrity playing her best role. Andrew Valko is fooling us. The scenery could have been mistaken for a photography of a painting representing a celebrity. The artist is used to depict fragmentary narratives in hyper realistic paintings. Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Amanda Seyfried, Angelina Jolie or Anthony Hopkins are taking part of this set up.

Andrew Valko creates a glowing contrast between the portraits and the surroundings with details meticulously painted. Playing with the flare and shadows of the street and car lights accentuates the expressions on the faces. Each painting represents a different parking lot with a different background. The feeling of nostalgia due to the context is palpable. There’s a will to go forward, represented by the contemporary actors. Yet the old school drive-in scene is taking us back to the past.

In the artist’s paintings, our eyes take turn alternatively as viewers and voyeurs. We start off as being the viewers, as if we were participating in the scene, comfortably watching from our car. And we quickly become the voyeurs; standing afar from the whole scene, watching the viewers watching the movie. This juxtaposition is interesting in the work. Clearly Andrew Valko manipulates us until the end. Therefore we could investigate and go as fas as wondering if the use of Hollywood stars is a pretext to entice us into the paintings. (via Design Boom)

Marc Quinn Creates Haunting Self-Portrait Sculptures Made Out Of His Own Blood

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Sculptures of the artist. By himself. Made from his own body. Marc Quinn creates self-portraits with his blood. Every five years he makes a fresh one. Keeping track of his aging throughout the years. The process can appear gory and frightening but it is as close to reality as a portrait can be.

He repeats the operation by making a plaster mold of his face and by going to the doctor to get his blood drawn. The equivalent of a pint is drawn every week (not at once). The blood is injected into the molded face and preserved in a frozen environment. It could not sustain another way.
The first realization that blood is actually sitting in front of us can be disgusting and intolerable. It’s really the process that is intimidating. Once it’s understood then the concept behind this idea can be perceived, analyzed and accepted.

Marc Quinn’s intention is not only to make an organic piece but to keep it alive. By manipulating the scientific world to obtain what he wants he opens a new angle. He is redefining the limits in terms of means of expression. Ice and blood in that case coming from the same person making his auto-portrait dematerialize the notion of infinity. There’s also a melancholic feeling. When an artist depicts a self-portrait, the tone is usually neutral or positive. Considering that Marc Quinn chooses to represent himself as a volume of blood interrogates on what are the real motivations behind such a work and the artist’s inner self-regard. (via Ignant)

Heart-warming Photographs Of Superman Falling, Failing And Chasing His Dreams

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Superman meets our ordinary daily laborious life. Ole Marius Joergensen depicts in his pictures the super hero trying to fly and making his dreams come true. An unusual situation here, as we witness Superman failing. We watch the struggle and identify with the character.

The series called ‘No. Superhero’ is inspired by comics and Norwegian values. The fantasy world created by Ole Marius Joergensen is grounded and disciplined. Halfway between a painting and a photography, the color scheme is colorful yet soft. The artist chooses to represent the super hero with different kinds of men and keeps the red and blue costume as well as the cape. He is climbing a high ladder, landing on a tree, falling headfirst on the snow or appearing lost in an empty field.

Failing and holding on until success is reached is part of human life. The unusual appearance of Superman within each scenes makes the introspection interesting. Are we dreaming too much and that’s why we are failing? Or is it necessary to fall and learn in order to progress and attain our goals? Ole Marius Joergensen seems to project his hopes and aspirations. Bringing reality to anyone who doubts of its capacity to make dreams come true. Creating a space for errors and multiple attempts appears necessary according to the artist, apparently even Superheroes fail from time to time.

Ash Thayer’s Raw Photographs Document Her Years As A Punk Rocker Who Lived In NYC Squats

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Ash Thayer photographs are the reflection of her life. Portraits, landscapes and places that represent the beginning of her life as a young woman braving the intense city of New York. ‘Kill City’ is her memoir through those years. It’s a compact diary comprised of photographs taken when she was living in the See Skwat squat after she got evicted from her first apartment in the city. The pictures are raw and incredibly emotional. It’s not a wish to uncover a way of living, it’s a desire to extract the beauty that lies inside the characters and scenes she witnessed.

At 19 years old, Ash Thayer found herself evicted. With no resources and no family, she found in a Lower East Side building a shelter, a roof to call home. She surrounded herself with a new family, punks surviving just liked her. Soon realizing that she was deeply touched by social activism and protest movements she took part in defending and documenting the subculture she was living in.

The subjects of her photographs are simple and honest. People from her daily life posing naturally under the dim lighting of the squat. There’s no intention in claiming a harsh living situation or showing off extreme conditions. In her pictures, the artist depicts vulnerable sincere souls supporting each other. “On the street [people saw us as] street hustlers, trouble makers, vandals—that just wasn’t really the case. We were hanging out, drinking and watching 90210 around one TV, like 15 of us”.

Ash Thayer’s photographs will be exhibited at Superchief Gallery in Los Angeles starting September 19th 2015. The ‘Kill City’ book is available for purchase here.

Maxine Helfman Tackles Complex Racial Issues By Taking Photographs Of Black Models Posing In Flemish Traditional Costumes

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Black models dressed up in traditional Flemish costumes. Maxine Helfman takes photographs the way Old Masters would have portrayed high society in the 17th century. In this series called “Historical Correction”, the artist offers the option of a reverse history. She wants to create a past that never existed. Her purpose is to create a dialogue with the viewers.

Using the same white collars, hats and black tunics. Even the poses are similar, mostly directly looking into the camera, only portraits and a use of lighting which features the faces. She doesn’t use a frame in order to keep the focus on the portraits. Maxine Helfman confirms that she was very careful on how approaching this project. Being a white women herself, she didn’t want to create confusion around a sensible subject.

By creating fictional narratives, she gives another outlook on history and culture. She directs the issues of race by looking at a different society in another time. The photographs are an indirect testimony that race and class are nowhere to be parted. Using art as a mean to express an idea, to make a statement; her series is not to be looked at as a final fact. She opens the door to a discussion about race, equality and how these issues are dealt within their country, wherever the viewers are. “All of my projects begin with that concept….it is the conversation that is generated that is fascinating…..positive and negative”.

Artist Duo Designs 100 Ceramic Mugs In 100 Days Guaranteeing That You’ll Find The Perfect Beverage Holder

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100 mugs in 100 days. The creative duo Charlie and Blair rose to the challenge. The result is a collection of ceramic mugs, hand made and hand painted. Passionate about their work, they were able without any difficulty to create the mugs in a conventional and less conventional way. Adrian ‘Charlie’ is the one making the shapes, while Heather ‘Blair’ paints. The project nourished their excitement and enthusiasm, striving to stay focused and creative at the same time. “It’s that passion and drive that keeps you motivated to create day in and day out”.

The design of the mugs started as commercial. Adrian says the greatest challenge was to innovate. To encounter the risk of facing self doubt, anxiety and failure during the process. Therefore, there’s a clear exploration of shape, form and function. Some pieces end up not representing at all a conventional mug. The paintings on the mugs were inspired by travels to Turkey, Korea and Japan. Heather translated architecture and decorative patterns on mosques, tiles and jewelry into the ornaments of the mugs. She mostly used quirky designs and doodles. There’s an intention to contrast the original and singular shapes with classic color tones. Making each piece unique and one of a kind.

Discover more of Charlie and Blair’s projects on their website and Instagram.