Over 14,000 Illustrations From The French Revolution Depicting Battalions, Guillotines And Royal Satires Are Now Available Online

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Printed cards illustrating French Revolution scenes. These and another 14,000  illustrations were made available on the French Revolution Digital Archive thanks to the collaboration between Stanford University and the French National Library (Bibliothèque Nationale de France). It’s a mix of caricatures of revolutionary vilains and heroes, key symbols such as the ‘guillotine’ and documents as serious as parliamentary deliberations.

It took several years to bring together the multitude of documents which are now grouped at the French Revolution Digital Archive. It’s been divided into two categories: Parliamentary Archives and French Revolution images dating from 1789.
The data is easily searchable by either random intellectuals or passionate historian. The documents browsed on the site take the form of prints, medals, coins and other elements.

When they don’t represent guillotines instruments or costumes of the time in total seriousness, the illustrations as colorful and amusing. In one of the cards for instance, the people of France, the ‘enemy’ are depicted as a multi-headed beast attacking the aristocracy and the battalion. White, blue and red, tones of the French flag, are mainly used to color the hand drawn cards. A constant reminder, despite the satirical drawings, of the omnipresence and importance of French patriotism at that time.

More illustrations are available on the French Revolution Digital Archive. (via HyperAllergic)

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Robert Buelteman Scalps, Electrocutes And Paints On Flowers To Create Exquisite Camera-Free Pictures

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Flowers and plants glowing in the dark. These pictures are the result of a titanesque work performed on each nature based element by Robert Buelteman. The California based artist is not using anything else than flowers, photographic films, electricity and a fiber-optic probe to create his work. The result is captivating and intriguing.

Robert Buelteman starts his process by picking fresh flowers and plants from a field. He lays them onto a photographic film in darkness after scalping them until they are sheer. He then throws a 80,000 volts current with his car battery, illuminating their unique energy field and exposing the film to their ultraviolet corona.
The artist painstakingly applies the fiber-optic probe, which is the size of a human hair. By tracing over the shapes, some light is reflected, some absorbed, but the light that penetrates the subject exposes the film with the color and form of its’ source. This method requires, for a one successful picture at least 150 tries.

This camera-free, non-digital process only uses the natural and genuine energy of the plants. A statement dear to Robert Buelteman, a former classic photographer, who decided to counteract the growth of digitalized photography by going back to simplicity and craftsmanship. His is attempting to demonstrate that creativity is in the hands of everyone, for the ones that are willing to put the work. And that a piece or art doesn’t need to have a particular meaning. He prefers to let the electrocuted flowers speak for themselves.

Robert Bueltman’s pieces will be displayed at Adler & Co Gallery in San Fransisco until December 28th 2015

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Made With Color Presents: Pop Culture And Vintage Comics Colide In The Work Of Emmett Potter

Emmett Potter - Design 40Emmett Potter - Design 36Emmett Potter - Design 35Brawl_BlackFinal.jpgWe’re glad to introduce, via the website building platform Made With Color, new artists weekly. Made With Color is an interactive website builder helping creative people design their portfolio without a complicated set up. The templates are minimalistic in their structure and their colors, allowing the eyes of the readers to focus on the art pieces.  This week we’re excited to share the work of Made With Color user Emmett Potter.

Vibrant colors and figurative shapes live in Emmet Potter’s art pieces. The artist uses mid 20th century comic graphics, advertisements, found objects and photography. His subjects therefore become mixed media pieces blending collage and paint. He calls them ‘handmade ready-mades’. Characters in action involving guns, missiles, love and war in a vivid and  expressive environment. The content depicted by Emmett Potter is inspired by Pop culture and Jungian archetypes. A chosen process to help increase communication with the mass and unfold collective consciousness. The rendering takes the form of traditional canvas paintings or unusual sculpture composition.

Hargreaves + Levin Explore The Beauty Of Symmetry With Their Mesmerizing Photos Of Patterns Made With Fruits And Vegetables

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Shapes that appear familiar displayed in a symmetrical manner and playing with our imagination. Photographer Henry Hargreaves and food stylist Caitlin Levin have come together once again under Hargreaves + Levin to collaborate on a food project. This time using only fruits and vegetables and grouping them by monthly harvest.

January: endive, radicchio, kale, turnips, leeks
February: papaya, radish, onions, clementine, oregano, passion fruit, chive flowers
March: asparagus, artichoke, broccolini, greens, string beans
April: spring onions, purple potatoes, fingerling potatoes, carrots , herbs
May: carrots, limes, peas, garlic shoots, zucchini
June: fava, chives, apricots, cherries, plums, sugar snaps, peaches, blueberries, strawberries, radish
July:, figs, plums, oregano, ochre , greens, raspberries, onions
Aug:, tomatoes, basil
Sept: corn, garlic, beans, Mexican sour gherkins, ground cherries , sunchoke, dill
October: mushrooms, greens
November: purple cabbage, bok choy, shallots, cauliflower , tangelo, pomegranate seeds, sunchoke
December: pears, potatoes, sage, rosemary, brussel sprouts, persimmons, shallots, nutmeg, mandarins, cranberries

From far, the whole picture looks like a perfectly arranged combination of shapes and harmonized color tones. Some of the shapes seem familiar until we come closer and discern the fruit and veggies one by one. We’re then able to see every curve, nook and cranny in detail. The mirrored images help create a symmetry. This process allows the fruits and veggies to become a design, a pattern within the picture.

The rendering is both astonishing and intriguing. On each small surface of the photograph, with the help of imagination we can envision creatures, insects and creative characters. Acting just like the Rorschach test, the combination of fruits and veggies trigger the mind to explore the picture and come up with a unique vision. The purpose of the project designed by Hargreaves and Levin is to ‘explore symmetry, natural beauty, and the way imperfections and inconsistencies often become the most breathtaking examples of nature’s artistry’.

The photographs above and below this text have been displayed to match the monthly order of the year.

Daisuke Tajima’s Images Of The Ultra-Detailed Cities That Live Within His Mind

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Daisuke Tajima’s paintings are vertiginous in all aspects. They depict ultra-detailed never-ending tall buildings. The artist is placing the perspective from above, as if we were flying amongst the city. But the beauty of these paintings lies in the fact that they are all imaginary.

To get lost into his art. This seems to be the aim of the young artist. The paintings are massive and the features of the city landscapes so small. The rooftops are particularly intricately detailed. From the pipes and machineries to the hoists. The repetition of these elements form a pattern which appears regularly throughout the painting and which makes the whole picture look claustrophobic. Daisuke Tajima says he feels comfortable in this world. He seems to dominate what is around him. An escape which he purposely created in order to be able to feel safe and in control.

“I wanted to hide away in my own world to ease the loneliness and insecurity I felt from not belonging. This piece is a world I can believe in.”

Daisuke Tajima just recently graduated in Japan. His talent was rewarded by a prize of 10 million yen (about $83K) for the cityscape series “gokinchotaikoku II”. Although this sounds like a rich outcome, it doesn’t look like success will stop the prodigy from creating sensitive and meaningful art pieces. Loosing himself into the depth of an imaginary city is Daisuke Tajima’s symbolic hideaway. (via Juxtapoz)

Street Artist Hula Takes A Break From The City To Paint Hyper-Realistic Women’s Portraits In The Middle Of Water

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Hula balances his paddle board on the water the same way he balances the hyper-realistic paintings of women he depicts above the surface of that same water. The artist chooses abandoned sites and approaches the walls of his future murals by paddling on his surf board and carefully bringing his paint and brushes along with him.

Sean Yoro, a.k.a. Hula, represents women gracefully enjoying the contact of the water. The colors used are natural, dissolving with the stone color tones of the murals and the grey/green tones of the water. Geometric pastel signs are drawn onto the naked parts of their bodies such as the neck, shoulders and arms. The rest of their bodies is covered with water as Hula depicts only the top parts of the women’s bodies. The reflection of the pictures onto the surface of the water creates a double image, accentuating the peaceful and intimate moments caught by the artist.

Hula captures the smiles of pleasure and well being the women are experiencing in hidden places. Leaving the viewer wondering who these women are and if they even exist. Away from the city of New York, with nothing but his paint and his women, the moments spent scouting locations and painting in solitude in the middle of nowhere confers a meditative break to the artist.

Ron Nagle Uses Doo-Wop Music And Hot Rod Painting To Create His Unusually Seductive Ceramic Sculptures

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Ron Nagle makes mini sculptures using a variety of colors and shapes. He takes ceramics to another level, transforming utilitarian pottery into abstract modern art. In the ‘Five O’Clock Shadow’ series he presents innovative forms mixed with saturated colors.

He uses different methods to produce his pieces such as slip-casting and hand-molding. Dealing with traditional and non-traditional materials, including glazed ceramic, Sculp-metal, polyurethane, and epoxy. Ron Nagle always lays his inspiration on paper. Transferring the sketch into a 3 dimensional piece. The sculptures are never more high than a few inches. The shapes are figurative and translate the artist’s passion for tea cups, its handles and bowl volume. His gets inspired by the works of Giorgio Morandi, Philip Guston, Japanese Momoyama ceramics, and George Herriman.

Ron Nagle injects in his art pieces a glimpse of pop art and a dash of music. He is a ceramist as well as a confirmed singer. The sculptures seem to be on the verge of moving. At any moment, they can get moving. The top parts, which are almost all twisted and contorted are waiting for the signal of the viewer to maliciously escape from their pedestal.
The artist wants to trigger new sensations from the viewer. His work is meant to be singular. According to him, there’s no point in looking at a form of art for which we already felt something. Emotions generated from his work has to be fresh and possibly never been experienced before.

Ron Nagle is represented by the Matthew Marks gallery in New York. (via Sweet Nation)

Cayce Zavaglia’s Portraits Appear As Hyper-Realist Paintings When They are In Fact Detailed Embroideries

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Portrait paintings or portrait embroideries? Cayce Zavaglia wants us to wonder and question the technique she is using. ‘About-Face’ is actually a series of embroideries. And they depict exclusively the artist’s close friends and family members. When flipped around, the portraits become abstract art pieces. “an attempt to show both sides…in hopes of initiating a dialogue about the two sides we each possess: the presented and the private self.’

As a former painter Cayce Zavaglia knows the impact of a brushstroke on the canvas and is therefore able to meticulously transfer the effect onto the tapestries. She begins the process by roughly taking a hundred pictures of her futur subject. She wants to catch the right expression. After selecting just one picture she starts working with one-ply embroidery thread on Belgian linen. She is able to render via fabric and thread the intricate details of blended colors and the texture that imitates oil painting.

The artists wants to create a dialogue between the viewer, the subject and herself. From far, the viewer might perceive the hyper-realist portraits as paintings and that’s ok. Up-close, they realize the mean used is embroidery. And by looking at the reverse side of the piece the viewers can begin to connect with the subject. The back of tapestries were historically never shown to the public. Cayce Zavaglia is making an exception. Because abstraction blurs the boundaries between the viewer and the art piece he/she is looking at and that’s when the dialogue begins to become interesting.

Cayce Zavaglia’s work will be displayed at Lyonswier Gallery in New York from November 5th until December 6th 2015. The artist’s daily process is updated on her Instagram account.