The Wildly Warped Sculptures of Jonty Hurwitz

Much of the work of Jonty Hurwitz plays with perspective.  This is perhaps most obvious in the art pictured here.  Hurwitz creates severely warped sculptures that are snapped back to shape in the reflection of a cylindrical mirror.  He does this by scanning objects, digitally manipulating them, and fabricating the digital models.  This explanation, though, is extremely simplistic.  On his process, Hurwitz says:

“I usually start by expressing a concept using mathematical tools, often involving billions of calculations and many months of preparation. I then explore ways to manifest these formulae in the physical world.” [via]

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Doing Chores 20 Feet above the Sidewalk

Artist Angie Hiesl‘s site specific pieces blend installation and performance.  Her X-Times People Chair series elevates senior citizens to traffic-stopping heights.  Hiesl installs a steel chair on the fascades of buildings about ten to twenty feet off the ground.  Performers typically between sixty and seventy years old perch themselves on the chair.  The perching senior citizens perform mundane daily routines such as reading the paper or folding clothes for the duration of the perfomance.

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Jana Maré in Ruins of a Home

The new work from Australian photographer Jana Maré in a way presents different relationships.   Maré’s nude body is found throughout a deteriorating house, interacting with various rooms and structures.  The physical relationship expressed in the photos at once recalls the structure’s past incarnation as a home and emphasizes its current dilapidation.  At the same time, though, Maré, in using her own body and refusing to use digital manipulation seems to have a nearly uneasy relationship with the camera and viewer – her posing a kind of performance that has been frozen.

Ahn Jun’s Photography at Dizzying Heights

The photographic images of artist Ahn Jun unfold at dizzying heights.  Ahn captures her self-portraits perched atop ledges and windowsills.  The frightening heights don’t act as a gimmick it does in the current Russian fad that may come to mind.  Rather, Ahn uses the elevation more as a narrative tool.  While clearly referencing suicide, she pushes the story beyond that also.  She nearly seems not only to be involved in an inner drama but interacting with the cityscape as a whole – she looks as if to be addressing the city personally.

The Film-Like Photography of Tajette O’Halloran

The photographic work of Tajette O’Halloran is narrative rich.  Each image seems stolen from a story in progress.  The photographs borrow filmic qualities not only in its storytelling  but style lighting and composition.  Indeed, O’Halloran had spent time as a location scout for Australia’s film industry.  She’s kept her eye for location and sense of drama.  The self-portrait series featured here is set in an abandoned house in Barre, Massachusetts.

O’Halloran relates of the experience, “While staying here in this environment I felt compelled to create a photographic story of captivity, abandonment and surrender. I wanted to explore the fragility, torment and eventual freedom of the mind  when left alone with yourself and your thoughts.”

Justin Bettman’s Bagel Project

Photographer Justin Bettman‘s Bagel Project is much more than a series of well produced photographs.  Bettman meets with homeless people throughout California and exchanges a bagel for a story.  He then documents each story with a photograph.

Bettman admits, “The homeless in our cities are often forgotten, as after a while they become a part of the city themselves; blending in like streetlights and bus stops, or any of the other things we walk by hundreds of times a day.”

His images, though, reveal incredible depths of narrative in simple subtle facial expressions.  He goes on to say, “I’ve been continually surprised by the fact that these people are content with their lives; if anything, they are happier to have a friend to talk to rather than the food provided.”

Bettman’s blog accompanies each photo with a story – an extremely interesting read that is difficult leaving.

The Light Machines of Conrad Shawcross

It is difficult to define the Lightwork series of Conrad Shawcross – sculpture, installation, perhaps even performance.  His pieces are typically large machines that move and spin bright lights in a manner that is somehow at once mechanistic and human.  The sculptures are built of elaborate machinery similar in appearance to factory robots.  However, in a way Shawcross juxtaposes the utilitarian appearance of his machines with their art-making purpose.

He says, “I really like them as unfinished objects. The minute they turn, you are left in a much easier position of ‘ok, that’s about a spinning light bulb’. But before they operate, you have to be more aggressively thoughtful to try and work out what they are for.” (via)

Scott Dickson’s Hidden Monuments

The name of Artist Scott Dickson‘s series Moment Monument, like the artwork, is a juxtaposition of sorts.  Using vintage postcards as collage material, Dickson obscures the monuments that are the intended subject of the photographs.  Using the vintage photos and geometric forms, Dickson relieves the monuments of their narrative and posterity.  This allows a second look at the monuments physical context – it’s pedestal, its surrounding, the space it in inhabits.  More importantly, though, it encourages a second look at monument’s conceptual context – the meaning of commemoration and memory through sculpture.