Vik Muniz’ Huge Scrap Metal Animals

Vik Muniz installation6 Vik Muniz installation7

Vik Muniz installation1

Brazilian artist Vik Muniz created these images of animals using scrap metal.  You can get idea of the huge scale of Muniz’ work by looking at the first image – notice the pile of car doors on the left.  Much of Muniz’ art is an accumulation of what many would consider garbage to create fine art.  He creates huge ‘collages’ from these objects, photographs them, and returns them to their smaller scale.  You may recognize Muniz and his work from the acclaimed documentary Wasteland in which his process was detailed. [via]

Advertise here !!!

Do Ho Suh’s ‘Infinitely’ Repeating Sculpture

Do Ho Suh Sculpture6 Do Ho Suh Sculpture5

Do Ho Suh Sculpture4

Korean artist Do Ho Suh has often explored thoughts on collective strength (and perhaps weakness) in his work before.  However, his new sculpture Karma addresses a more personal collectivity.  This enormous sculpture seems to stretch on perpetually.  At the sculpture’s base a man stands with his eyes covered by another man crouching on his back.  That man’s eyes are also covered by another man crouching on his back and this pattern appears to repeat ad infinitum.  Perhaps a literal visual interpretation of the concept of karma or even the saying ‘history is doomed to repeat itself’.

[via]

Advertise here !!!

The Luminaria’s Colorful and Inflatable Architecture

Architects of Air1 Architects of Air10

Architects of Air6

Luminaria by Architects of Air is a touring inflatable structure.  The ‘building’ has made stops internationally since 1992.  Visitors to the Luminaria remove their shoes and enter an air lock.  Once through the airlock visitors are free to roam the structure.  The Luminaria is built of inflated PVC.  Sunlight from outside shines through the various colors of PVC creating an otherworldly glow.  The highly saturated colors coupled with the gently curving walls and floor give the Luminaria a subtle biological nature.  Interestingly one visitor describes the structure as ” Somewhere between a womb and a cathedral.”

Pinched, Pulled And Crumpled Wood Sculptures From Cha Jong-Rye

Cha Jong-Rye sculpture5 Cha Jong-Rye sculpture6

Cha Jong-Rye sculpture2

The work of Korean artist Cha Jong-Rye looks like anything but wood.  Her large pieces hang on the wall as if they were draped cloth, strange liquids, and geological formations.  Her peculiar choice of medium undoubtedly references these and other ideas of nature and the home.  She painstakingly carves her work from wood, often from hundreds of small pieces.  She seems to crumple, pinch, and pull a material that’s especially rigid, typically found as a tree or house.  They’re temptingly tactile – if no one in the gallery noticed I’d nearly be enticed to drag my fingers across their surface. [via]

Ana Bidart’s Amazing Paper Roll Sculptures

Ana Bidart sculpture5 Ana Bidart sculpture4

Ana Bidart sculpture2

Ana Bidart‘s sculptures resemble small geological models.  She wears away layers and layers of paper to create each piece.  Reminiscent of rolls of receipt paper or even toilet paper, her medium in this series usually has a particularly utilitarian purpose.  Her sculptures emphasize the objects’ more poetic characteristics.  Though solid and consistent in appearance Bidart exposes the many layers that form the whole.  Her work easily lends itself to various metaphors.

The Cotton Candy Installation of Erno-Erik Raitanen

Erno-Erik Raitanen installation1 Erno-Erik Raitanen installation7

Erno-Erik Raitanen‘s site specific installation, Cotton Candy Works, is built to crumble.  For the installation Raitanen builds a wall of cotton candy.  Visitors lick or pull off the cotton candy.  Within hours the entire installation returns back to its original nature – the fluffy sugar reverts back to its crystalline form.  The installation is definitely playful and looks like for gallery visitors.  Its more serious ideas of creation and destruction can’t be ignored.

The Gracefully Surreal Photography of Noell Oszvald

noell oszvald photography4 noell oszvald photography2

Young Hungarian photographer Noell Oszvald creates elegantly surreal images.  Her black and white photographs resemble mid-century fashion photography as much as it does the work of her surrealist influences.  Severe contrasts between light and dark create graceful lines and a definite composition for each piece.  In this way each image is intriguing, not only for its dreamy content but also because they are simply pleasing to look at.  Perhaps what is most surprising, though, is the fact Oszvald’s relationship with the camera is relatively new.  Only twenty-two years old Oszvald has only been using the medium for a little over a year. [via]

Scott Young’s Punk Rock Veggies

scott young photography3 scott young photography1

The work of Scott Young is a playful turn on food photography.  His fruits and vegetables seem not so much delicious as rebellious.  Young photographs various produce covered with studs usually found on clothing.  He mixes the language of punk rock fashion with that of food photography to in a way that each undermines the other.  The simple idea is strangely amusing.  The disparate context of each crash together to create a new one that seems to somehow make sense in its own way.