The Jarred Trees of Naoko Ito

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The sculptures of Naoko Ito are elegant in their simplicity.  Indeed, these pieces are entirely constructed of only two materials: a tree and jars.  A limb of a tree is cut into several segments and each segment, in turn, is placed in a jar.  Naoko carefully arranges the jarred pieces to reconstruct the shape of the limb.  A subdued commentary on the relationship between humans and nature, the imagery is immediate all the same.  Though the shape and size of the tree limb is intact, the jarred branches are nearly gloomy.

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The Library Dioramas of Marc Giai-Miniet

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These aren’t photos of bisected buildings. Rather, they’re the carefully constructed dioramas of artist Marc Giai-Miniet.  His little libraries inhabit multi-storied buildings, perfectly suitable for us bookish nerds.  However, many of his pieces almost seem to be hiding something sinister.  The floors become darker, dirtier, more utilitarian the deeper they are in the building.  Soot stained boiler rooms occupy the basement floors along with objects long forgotten.  Perhaps the entire structure is a metaphor for the mind in a way: the diligent ego among the book lined floors and the unconscious hidden down in the dingy cellar.

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Light Sculptures from Diet Wiegman

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Under the typical gallery bright lights these sculptures from artist Diet Wiegman may seem like innocuous piles of trash.  However, these ‘piles’ are meticulously arranged and precisely lit.  The resulting shadows resemble famous works of art, icons, and images.  He creates coveted works of art through refuse in something as elusive as a shadow.  Though various types of ‘light sculptures’ have made their way through art in the past few years, Wiegman is a veteran.  He has been using shadows and light as a medium for nearly five decades.      [via]

Christopher Jonassen’s Planet-Like Pots

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Photographer Chistopher Jonassen‘s series Devour seems cosmic in origin.  They appear to be photographs of planets mottled by millions of years of meteorite impacts and scarred by geological forces.  In reality the series depicts the bottoms of pots.  The worn metal is burnt, scratched, and often just old.  Devour illustrates the destruction, even violence, inherent in eating and nourishment.  On his website Jonassen precedes the series with a quote from philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre: “To eat is to appropriate by destruction.”

Mr.Div’s Mesmerizing GIFs

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Matthew DiVito, also known as mr. div, is a motion graphics designer and aspiring game developer.  Using a cocktail of software DiVito produces these hypnotic gif images.  A popular file type in the 1990’s, gifs are experiencing a resurgence in popularity.  DiVito’s images certainly retain a retro sensibility.  However, gone are the blocky appearance and wonky movement typical of the first wave of gifs.  His work has a certain cosmic precision and elegance making each file slightly mesmerizing.

Existential Before And After Portraits From Ana Oliveira

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Photographer Ana Oliveira‘s Identities II is a touching series of portraits.  She begins with old photographs of her subjects and through similar lighting, clothing, and poses she creates a parallel photograph.  As much as sixty years lies between some of the older and newer portraits.  The two portraits arranged side by side become a sort of existential before and after.  I find myself imagining what took place in the decades between the two photographs, evidence of something in the now more pronounced lines in each sitters face.  Its difficult not to envision expressions of expectation in the younger portraits, and mixtures of disappointment or content in their older counterparts.

The Mangled Wooden Figures Of Aron Demetz

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Aron Demetz‘ newest work shows him to be extremely adept at sculpting in wood.  His figures seem stand atop stumps, perfectly carved from tree trunks.  However, their sanded smooth skin is in stark contrast to parts of their figure that seem mutilated and mangled.  While the figures’ faces are peacefully inexpressive, there is an underlying violence to the sculptures.  The bare wood of the pedestals hint at the natural world and the sculptures at human’s often turbulent interaction with it.  [via]

Andrew Myers’ Portraits Made of Screws

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Andrew Myers‘ uses unique medium to interesting effect.  His pieces are built of many carefully placed screws – up to nearly 10,000 in just one piece – inserted to just the right depth.  He then uses oils to pain the image on the heads of the screws.  Myers accepts the challenges of depicting soft surfaces, movement, and light with a material as hard and utilitarian as screws.  The result is an intriguing mix between painting and relief.  The screws add to the depth to that typically found in oil painting.