Sculptural Portraits Made From The DNA Left On Your Trash

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Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg‘s project, Stranger Visions, is a wonderful mix of science and art.  Dewey-Hagborg turns a poetic attention to the seemingly innocuous artifacts of life: a hair, chewed gum, a cigarette butt.  Beyond sight, though, the DNA remains of each unique person inhabits these “artifacts”.  She picks up these remains up throughout Brooklyn and brings them to a nearby biology lab.  Dewey-Hagborg extracts the DNA from the object, then information from the DNA.  She runs the information through a program she has written herself that is able to determine physical features such as eye color, hair color, gender, nose width, and so on.  That information is then exported to a 3D color printer to create a sculptural portrait of the unwitting donor.  [via]

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A Laser Cut Plane Crash By Mezzapelle And Deriu

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There is something especially frightening about Lara Mezzapelle and Giacomo Deriu‘s sculpture, Dirittura d’Arrivo.  The sculpture freezes the moment a plane rips in half, about to plunge from the sky.  All of the ensuing chaos – panicking passengers, flying luggage, mangled metal – is caught completely and eerily in white.  A fear of flying has been a common modern phobia.  However, as critic Olivia Spatola points out, a plane crash in a post 9/11 world reflects the more modern fear of a new kind of violence.  In a way Mezzapelle and Deriu capture this modern fear in their medium and process.  The sculpture is planned using 3D modeling software, and cut from nylon using prototyping lasers.

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Shadow Street Art Portraits Using Kitchen Strainers

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Strainers are tools not often seen outside of the kitchen, much less in the art studio.  However, artist Isaac Cordal puts them to use in a series of street installations titled Cement Bleak.  For the series Cordal sculpts human faces into the mesh of the hand held strainers.  The strainers are then inserted into the ground.  Sunlight or streetlights pass through the strainers and project a shadow portrait onto the sidewalk.  The nature of strainer’s mesh allows for a strangely realistic face from several angles of light.

Manon Wethly’s Flying Beverages

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Photographer and designer Manon Wethly has been experimenting with a series of photographs that is almost certainly as fun to shoot as it is to look at.  Wethly flings beverages of all sorts into the air and photographs the flying liquid.  The floating globs of wine, juice, coffee, and milk which are in midair for a moment are instead frozen for a single image.  These flying spills resemble abstract glass sculptures.  They’re color against the blue sky and swirling shapes make these “accidents” artful.  [via]

Textile Mugshots By Joanne Arnett

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Artist Joanne Arnett‘s artwork reproduces mugshots in a uniquely meticulous way.  She painstakingly recreates these images as woven textiles.  Mixing thread a wire, the result is similar to a shimmering newspaper photograph.  Mug shots are generally thought of as utilitarian, empty of aesthetic, and quickly forgotten.  Arnett wittily juxtaposes this against the form of a tapestry – valuable textiles often passed on as heirlooms.  Interestingly, the title of each piece is the accused’s sentence.  For example, the title of the first image is “Two Years and a Fine of $2,000”.

Lunar Cycle Installation Examines The Relationship Between The Moon And The Ocean.

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Pool, The Alchemy of Blue by Australian artist Lizzie Buckmaster Dove poetically celebrates the relationship between the moon and the ocean.  The stone-like pieces found in these images are the remnants of swimming pool found near the ocean in Dove’s hometown of Coledale.  The nearby ocean was slowly destroying the pool with each tide.  The two installations pictured here are a kind of homage to the powerful force of the moon on the ocean below.  She constructed the circles below with her friends to coincide with the lunar cycle.  One arrangement featured the concrete fragment’s blue hued side facing up for the corresponding blue moon.  Dove and her friends organized an empty circle with the concrete at its perimeter for another arrangement to coincide with the new moon.   [via]

Amazingly Realistic Drawings Of Franco Clun

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The work of Italian artist Franco Clun may lead you to believe he’s a photographer.  Clun’s artwork, though, are created simply by putting pencil to paper.  Clun carefully crafts each drawing to an unbelievable realism.  Each drawing he completes seems to expand on the skill of the previous one.  He says, “For each new drawing I dedicate more time and attention and I try to push forward my technical limitations.  I learn something new every time I take a pencil in my hand.”  [via]

Alessandro Lupi’s Blacklight Bodies

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Artist Alessandro Lupi seems to capture ghosts in his eerie sculptures.  Lupi begins with simple thread to create his artwork.  He paints each strand one at a time with fluorescent paint.  The threads are then arranged and lit with black lights.  Lupi often arranges the thread in the form of a figure – a person that at once seems to inhabit a space and in the process of disappearing.  He calls his work ‘Fluorescent Densities’.  The designation alludes to the way he uses his medium to “investigate” and play with light and space.