Sohei Nishino’s Collaged City Maps

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Photographer Sohei Nishino creates unique maps to document memories more than geography.  An avid traveler, Sohei snaps countless photographs on his trips around the world.  By hand, he recreates the city from his many images as one large collage.  Not intended to be accurate representation, the ‘map’ is a record of the city as he experienced it.  He’s recorded trips to cities such as London, Paris, Jerusalem, Istanbul, Osaka, Berlin, and more.  To get an idea of the way the concept works check out the first two images – a ‘map’ of New York and details from the collage.

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Chinn Wang’s Screen Printed Wood Heraldry

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Chinn Wang creates an eye-catching brand of pop art.  Primarily working in screenprinting, she’s executed these piece directly on wood.  The work retains a charming flatness associated with screen printing while adding depth by printing on wood.  Her mix of new and old imagery and contrasting colors makes her art hard to pull away from.  Her Heraldry series is an excellent example.  Just as medieval heraldry made use of complex symbolism, Wang crests likewise make use of modern imagery.

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Beth Galton’s Photographs Of Cut Soup, Doughnuts, Coffee And More

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Beth Galton‘s series Cut Food is a side of food photography rarely seen – the inside.  Galton is a prolific photographer specializing in food.  While she works primarily in advertising and commercial photography, Cut Food is one of several conceptual projects from Galton.  The series captures common foods, though some not so commonly sliced in half.  Canned soups and a cup of coffee seem to rest perfectly in half of a container.  In order to catch some of these Galton replaced the liquids in the foods with a gelatin.

Anya Gallaccio’s 10,000 Dying Roses

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Anya Gallaccio‘s installation Red on Green may leave elicit a different reaction depending on when you catch the show.  Gallaccio plucked the heads of 10,000 roses and arranged them into large neat rectangle.  At first the installation may resemble a grand romantic gesture.  However, Gallaccio’s interest is piqued by what the installation becomes.  In a way Red on Green turns into a type of natural performance as the field of red shifts to brown.  She utilizes the loaded symbol of the rose as a starting point for investigating the natural processes of death and decay.

Rhinestoned Fish And Painted Taxidermy

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The artwork of Cassandra Smith exists in the space between juxtapositions.  Taxidermied animals are often a bit creepy.  However, Smith’s stuffed forest friends are also playfully decorated – fish covered in rhinestones, and fur in bright paint.  The natural plays with the synthetic, old with the new, and utilitarian with the decorative.  She says of her work:

“My work  is about manipulations and transformation. It is about exploring the ways that I can enhance and change found objects to give them something they did not have in their former life.”  [via]

Nonotak’s Glitchy And Aggressive Audiovisual Installation

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The audiovisual installation titled Isotope v.2 was created Nonotak – an art duo made up of Noemi Schipfer and Takami Nakamoto.  Light projections are projected on and through a box approximately thirteen feet on each side.  Accompanied by sound the projection begins rather subdued.  Low drones match lights moving and changing slowly.  Soon, however, the light and sound seems to quicken its pace, become glitchy, even aggressive.  Watch the video after the jump to see the Isotope v.2 in action.  The installation is a reference and response to Fukushima and its now infamous power plant.  Following the tragic 2011 earthquake control over the Fukushima power plant quickly deteriorated.  Using this as a metaphor for the human relationship with nuclear energy, the installation creates a type of immaterial prison.  Walls of light surround the visitors becoming ever more imposing as the projection progresses.

Chainlink Fence Transformed Into Shimmering Light Installation

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This installation by artist Soo Sunny Park is appropriately titled Unwoven Light.  Several sections of chain link fence have been connected and draped throughout the gallery.  The wave-like sections of fence are filled with small pieces of Plexiglas.  Light from the galleries many lamps and the sun at various angles fall through the glass projecting a multicolored pattern more impressive than the installation itself.   Park uses the light as a medium, unfurling from the fence and fully splayed on every gallery surface.    [via]

Nerhol’s Multilayered “Moving” Cut Paper Portraits

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The two artist collective known as Nerhol is made up of Yoshihisa Tanaka and Ryuta Iiada.  Their work focuses on pulling two dimensional work into the three dimensional realm.  These portraits, rather than a single image, are actually piles of photographs.  The subjects were asked to sit still for three minutes while a camera took photo after photo.  The photographs were then stacked and cut to reveal the numerous layers of portraits.  This layering effect reveals the subtle movements of each subject as if it were slowly warping a single image.   [via]