The Functioning Hydraulic Powered Sculptures James Capper

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These sculptures by artist James Capper are working hydraulic implements.  Their primary colors, spare design, and steel build make the pieces out to be purely utilitarian construction tools.  However, these aren’t actual power tools and they don’t necessary build anything.  Instead they sit menacingly with feeling like of the premonition of violence.  You can almost hear the hiss and huff of air powering the blades.  Perhaps the tools are a hint at the violence implicit in production and progress.

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The Highly Detailed Precarious Painted Cities of Amy Casey

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The cities of Amy Casey exist precariously.  Buildings tower, tilt, and balance about to topple.  Much like actual city life, the metropolis’ in Casey’s paintings can seem like a hard-fought existence bound by community.  Further tying her paintings with actual cities are the buildings that actually inhabit both worlds – amazingly, every single home and building in Casey’s paintings is based on one of her numerous photographs of actual structures.  In her statement, Casey says of her work:
“Cities are fascinating creatures that I am just beginning to scratch the surface of.  The work and organization that goes into a city’s creation and evolution, the constant shifting and adaptations, and the sometimes hidden history of these changes and a city’s dependence on civilian cooperation are things I like to think about.”

Also, check out a short documentary on Amy Casey here.

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Beached Whale Is Actually A Hyper-realistic Installation

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It would probably be prudent to begin by letting you know this whale is not real.  Rather, the whale is a highly-detailed site-specific installation and the “scientists are actors organized and created by a Belgian collective known as Captain Boomer.  The installation was on the banks of the river Thames and in conjunction with Greenwich + Docklands International Festival – an outdoor festival.  The installation (which pops up on various river banks throughout Europe) stir up and disrupt entire communities just as real beached whales do.  The collective sets out to educate communities on whale the beaching of whales and the larger issues tying humans to nature.  Regarding viewers’ unique reaction to their installation, Captain Boomer describes:

“During our beachings, we see an intensive interaction among the crowd. People address each other, speculate and wonder. They offer help and ask for information. The different layers of perception create funny games. Some audience members know it is a work of art but feed the illusion to other people.”

Dreamy Sculptures Based On Familiar Objects From Artists Home

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Canberra, Australia based artist Jacqueline Bradley creates artwork that is perhaps best described as dreamy – sleepily strange.  Her sculptural work is squarely based on familiar objects that recall a house and the home life inside.  Yarn, glasses, dinnerware all seem to diverge subtly but perceptibly from normal use.  In this way the sculptures seem more like playful memories of objects than the actual objects themselves.  Bradley’s work explores the home as a place and the way people engage with it.

Huge Paper Kite Installation By Jacob Hashimoto

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The installations of Jacob Hashimoto are at once huge and delicate.  Here, Hashimoto fills the gallery with hanging paper kites. Though the space is saturated with the kites, they seem to be nearly floating as a giant flock, weightless for a moment.  As is found often in his work, the kites appear to reference the natural world.  Some kites sway like an ocean with images of water printed on them.  Others are purely white and float in scattered bodies like clouds.  At times, the large flowing installation even resembles a school of fish. [via]

Walk ‘In Orbit’ 65 Feet Off the Ground In Tomás Saraceno’s New Installation

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Artist Tomás Saraceno just opened his newest installation on June 21 at K21 Staendehaus (see his work previously here).  He is known for creating sprawling interactive installations.  However, In Orbit is his largest and most complex piece to date.  Saraceno’s newest work is situated 65 feet over a piazza.  It consists of multi-tiered netting which visitors can wander through.  The installation is scattered with clear and metallic orbs, some nearly 30 feet in diameter, resembling planets floating in space.  [via]

Pixelated Portraits Hand Painted In Watercolor

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Nathan Manire‘s work may seem more akin to printing than painting.  These water color on paper pieces pleasantly blend digital and handmade imagery.  The bleeding and absorption of paint into the grain of the paper reveals the passing of an artist’s hand.  However, the paintings refer to the pixelized image.  In a strange way, stepping back from each painting seems to reveal more detail, while stepping forward again turns the piece into a nearly abstract work.  His skillful painting has won him high profile clients such as Nike, Wired magazine, and Cosmopolitan magazine.

Black And White Illustrations Of Imaginary Environments Transformed Into Sculptures

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Artist and illustrator Kevin LCK seems to stick to illustrating, even when crafting work in three dimensions.  Like his illustrative work, the sculptures are in spare black and white and made using paper. His Object series consists of a number of electronic appliances, such as a computer, microwave oven, and a television set.  Inside each appliance is a carefully crafted home setting.  Explaining the thought behind the series Kevin says:

 

“I seeked to detach the audience from the real world temporarily, provide them with a space to rethink and reconsider the way we behave and think about the relationship between ourselves, objects and environment with technology in a more conscious way.”