10 Street Art Images You Need To See

Justin Nether

Justin Nether

Pasha183

Pasha183

Insa

Insa

Each week we’re bringing to you ten street art images culled from the internet that you definitely need to see.  This week we have pieces of two current event pieces: one of Trayvon Martin by Justin Nether, and another touching on Edward Snowden by PosterBoy.    There’s also pieces that will mess with your perspective from artists Meres and Atou.  You’ll also find an awesome GIF/Mural hybrid from INSA, an actual fiery torch holding mural by Pasha183, and a pizzeria cloning mural from Escif.  Finally check out a wonderfully creepy piece from Dan Witz and entire two story painted gold and covered with a mural by the Hygienic Dress League.

Advertise here !!!

Colorful Abstractions Transformed Into Street Art

SONY DSC

Xuan Alyfe street art8

Xuan Alyfe street art7

The pieces of Xuan Alyfe arrive from a variety of influences rarely found in street art.  His work is largely abstract, but peppered with figures and other recognizable objects.  The murals seems to subtly reference minimalist, surrealist, and even graphic design styles.  Aylfe’s art even seems to piece together various influences of other street artists into his own distinct style.  Perhaps appropriately, then, he has exhibited and painted murals worldwide.

Advertise here !!!

Assembly Line Creates Product That Only Functions To Choreograph The Assembly Line

Cohen Van Balen performance3 Cohen Van Balen performance4

75 Watt – trailer from COHEN VAN BALEN on Vimeo.

Experimental design/art studio Cohen Van Balen‘s new project 75 Watts features an actual factory, assembly line, and workers.  However, the product the assembly line workers are constructing does absolutely nothing.  Well, almost nothing.  The purpose of the product is simply to choreograph the movements of the workers as they construct it.  75 Watts illustrates the complex dance of production, consumption, and the human relationships therein regardless of the product.  The project received its name from a rather creepy quote from the book Marks’ Standard Handbook for Mechanical Engineers: “A labourer over the course of an 8-hour day can sustain an average output of about 75 watts.”  Check out the video to see the dance of the pointless product.

Lee Hadwin Creates Art While Sleepwalking

Lee Hadwin drawing2 Lee Hadwin drawing8

Lee Hadwin drawing5

Some artists are so talented they seem to be able to do it in their sleep.  Lee Hadwin, though, can only do it in his sleep.  Since he was an early teenager, Hadwin would draw or paint on tables, walls, clothes all while sleep walking.  While awake he would show no sign of interest or talent in art making.  Now Hadwin is prepared at night – he sets art materials aside before going to bed.  Much of his work is elegantly simple, while other pieces are strangely intricate.  Peculiar symbols and recurring shapes seem to appear in much of his work making one wonder whats going on in the mind of sleeping Lee Hadwin.

Glitch Art Transformed Into Blankets And Tapestries

Phillip Stearns textiles2 Phillip Stearns textiles3

Phillip Stearns textiles4

New Media artist Phillip Stearns contrasts two mediums in a way that also conjures unexpected similarities.  Stearns has considerable experience with glitches – he’s the author of a Tumblr blog that presented a different glitch screen shot each day.  He went on to combine the cold digital spattering of glitches with warm textiles such as blankets and tapestries.  The pixels translate strangely well from screen to weave, the glitches not being lost in translation from one medium to the other.  Stearns says about his project:

“The Glitch Textiles project was started in 2011 with the goal of exploring the intersections of textiles and digital art. The idea was simple: Transcode glitches in the cold, hard logic of digital circuits into soft, warm textiles.  Following a successful funding campaign on Kickstarter in 2012, Glitch Textiles has grown to include a range of woven and knit wall hangings and blankets whose patterns are generated using images taken with short circuited cameras and other unorthodox digital techniques, including data visualization aided by the use of tools developed for digital forensics.”

Over 130 Gallons Of Paint Dumped In Busy Intersection

Iepe Rubingh street art2

Iepe Rubingh street art4

Dutch artist Iepe Rubinigh and the  Anonymous Crew took the term “street art” very literally with their piece Painting Reality.  The group, equipped on bicycles, purposely spilled over 130 gallons of eco-friendly water soluble paint in a Berlin’s busy Rosenthaler Platz intersection.  The cars then acted as brushes spreading the various colors through street.  An abstract painting detailing the fluid-like flow of traffic unfolded over the next several minutes and 2,000 cars.  Painting Reality introduced pleasantly bright color to otherwise drab asphalt.  More than that, though, the “strokes” of paint documented the moving life of a city.  Check out the video to the see paint drop and spread.

Geometric Light Patterns ‘Dance’ In Streets Of Tokyo

Tao Tajima 1Tao Tajima

Night Stroll from tao tajima on Vimeo.

Night Stroll is a new digital short from Japanese filmmaker Tao Tajima.  In the film, quick moving abstract light patterns pulse through otherwise quiet Tokyo streets.  The light patterns are impressively realistic and almost resemble the light painting of still photography.  Bright bursts of shapes are reflected in wet streets and cast shadows from behind trees and street corners.  Though there is little information regarding the film’s production, Tajima seems to have skillfully created the light patterns digitally.  He executes a simple idea very well – simple but realistic light dances as if it were alive and alone in the city.  Check out the video to see what the GIFs only preview.

People In Google Street View Turned Into Life Size Posters & Posted In Same Location

Paolo Cirio street art6 Paolo Cirio street art10

Paolo Cirio street art3

We each seem to know someone caught on Google’s Street View – even I can be found in my driveway on the online map.  While its surreal finding a part of real life online for anyone to see, artist Paolo Cirio brings it back to real life again with his series Street Ghosts.  Cirio finds images of people in Google Street View and prints life size posters of them.  He then wheat pastes each person in the physical location he found them on Street View.  Cirio makes a point of mentioning that the wheat pastes were printed and posted without authorization.  This underscores that these images of various were acquired without permission to begin with.  The series raises questions and concerns in regards to salvaging privacy in an increasing technological and commercial world.