Geometric Street Art Made From Wool Yarn

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On his website, the street artist Spidertag describes his work simply by writing “It´s all about nails + pure wool + geometry + abstraction + streets + abandoned”.  It can hardly be described more accurately.  Using nails and wool yarn, Spidertag installs geometric abstractions in beautifully lonely locations.  The work, as pure abstraction, doesn’t appear to reference any figurative object (except perhaps spiderwebs).  Though maybe burgeoning trend within street art, this type abstraction and material sets Spidertag’s work apart as understated and unique.

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Photographer Gives Roadkill Proper Burial Ceremonies

Fox, from the series At Rest

Owl, from the series At Rest

Pheasant, from the series At Rest

Emma Kisiel‘s series of photographs At Rest is as intriguing as it is simple.  Kisiel happens upon animals that have died, typically roadkill, and sparsely decorates the site.  Simply by placing stones and flowers around the carcass, Kisiel draws attention and returns a certain dignity to each animal.  Typically these animals are only seen from inside a car as it momentarily passes.  Kisiel says of her interaction with the animals in the series:

“They are happened upon, visited with, remembered, and left to return to nature.”  [via]

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Clever Street Artist Uses A Cement Truck’s Spinning Mixer To Create Striped Painting

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Italian artist Mimmo Rubino, also known as Rub Kandy, plays with the city.  His art’s relationship with the city and its citizens is interactive, even fun.  His newest project is simple but imaginative.  Rubino uses an urban mainstay as a canvas for his spray paint work: a cement truck.  While the mixer spins, Rubino keeps a spraying can of paint steady.  Repeating the process with various colors eventually covers the mixer in near perfect stripes.  Appropriately, the piece is titled Revolver.

Hypnotic Kaleidoscopic Video Of Major Cities

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Mirror City Timelapse from Michael Shainblum on Vimeo.

Film maker and photographer Michael Shainblum captured familiar city scenes in a way you’ve likely never seen them.  Shainblum captures time lapse sequences of cities such as Las Vegas, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Chicaog, then folds it in on itself.  The urban landscapes are seamlessly divided and replicated into four segments.  In a strange way, this hypnotic abstraction of the city nearly seems to make it easier to see the city as whole.  Each metropolis appears to pulse and glow as if it were a living being or complex computer system.  The video allows the viewer to step back and see the city as a complex collective system.  [via]

Pure Color Glows In Fog Installation

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Some of Ann Veronica Janssens‘ work is clearly and singularly about color.  For a number of her installations, Janssens’ uses a color film that transforms the light shining through it.  She then fills the space with an artificial fog which seems to glow with color.  The fog acts as a vehicle to carry the light and spread it into the air of the space; a way to experience color and only color.  There is no depth, texture, or line but just color and its saturation.  The installations create a dreamy atmosphere when any medium between color and the eye seems to disappear.

Artist Reconnects Illegally Cut Trees To Their Stumps

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The site specific installations Reconnected 1 and Reconnected 2 by artist Philippe Handford can be found on England’s Pendle Sculpture Trail.  The pieces are a sort of memorial to the area’s gruesome past.  In 1612 Pendle Hill was the site of a witch trail that ended with the execution of ten people.  Handford began his work with illegally felled tree.  He reconnects the trunk each tree to the stump supported by metal hardware.  The trees, though fallen, don’t seem entirely dead or gone.  They strangely bend to the toward the earth as if resting.

Violently Chaotic Installation Using Over 3 Miles Of Black Tape

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We’ve seen innovative art made from tape before.  The work of Monika Grzymala, though, is ambitious, seemingly chaotic, and even violent.  Using over three miles of black tape, Grzymala inundate’s the gallery space.  The tape wraps around corners and seems to splatter on to the wall as if it were liquid.  Grzymala’s work adds dimensionality to a usually flat material in a way that is surprising and nearly disturbing.  By appearing to forcibly occupy the gallery space, the installation compels the viewers to interact with the space in a new way.

Beautifully Lit Heaps Of Trash At Night

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There’s something at once lighthearted and sad about Benoit Paillé‘s photographs in the series Jour du Déménagement (translates from French as “Moving Day”).  Discarded furniture, boxes, mattresses and other household items sit in piles waiting to be picked up by the garbage truck.  The photographs are taken in the dark, seemingly in the middle of the night, and the trash lit by a single bulb.  Little attention is paid to garbage on the curb; at night while everyone is sleeping it’s completely forgotten.  Regardless, items we’ve lived with often for years quietly sit there all night.  The scene is reminiscent of food in the refrigerator, and wondering what happens when the door closes and the light goes out.