Genevieve Lawrence

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Is Genevieve Lawrence a Theosophic occultist?  Using secret, mystical insight to call home the star-walkers who built the multidimensional Pyramids?  Is she conjuring devious spells with strange hieroglyphs?  Based in abnormal, impious, and non-Euclidean geometry, the pictures come together around glowing cubes and patterned triangles.  This feels like the same dark magic on the one dollar bill or the Egyptian Book of the Dead.

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David Hornung

To S.P The woodlands, backyards and mountain fields David Hornung paints can feel like elegies for lost friends.  Conversely, much of the work is contagiously, imaginatively playful.  These paintings can be read in contradictory ways; simultaneously flat and deep, both graphic and luminous.  Hornung does this purposefully, because “picture making can be as paradoxical as life itself.”  The invented settings evoke “memory, the flow of time, and, for lack of a better phrase, the sheer enigma of existence.”  The light breaking on the horizon in “To S.P.” (above) is both beautiful and heartrendingly sad.  What does it say about us when a sunset begs to be personified?  You can see David’s work at Flowers Gallery in Chelsea from June 30 to July 31.

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Interview: Dan Attoe

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When I met Dan Attoe we were both starting the MFA program at the University of Iowa.  I’ve known him for eight years now, and even though Dan lives in Washington State and I live in New York we have maintained our friendship through collaborations, especially with the art group Paintallica.

While at school we became friends – I’ve noticed Dan sort of collects weirdos like me.  Before coming to grad school Dan had created a studio practice that involved making a painting a day, and was already working on paintings that have a relationship to his current work.  While in school Dan wasn’t stuck on some notion of an ideal practice, he just worked while everyone else was talking about how to work, he wasn’t terribly concerned with theories; he has a background in psychology and knew to trust his own creative faculties.

While everyone else was screwing around with their identities, Dan had already settled into a kind of self-knowledge.  I don’t know if his gnosis came from growing up in the deep woods with a forest ranger for a father, or from one of the experiences he had growing up that caused him to study psychology and art.

Being alive you meet a lot of bull shitters and have to play a lot of stupid games, but rarely do you meet someone as genuine and considerate as Dan.

Alexi Worth

6 FormalistsAlexi Worth’s playful paintings have an on-again-off-again relationship with photography, illustration, and art history.  The above painting is titled “The Formalists,” and it’s a very formal painting.  On one hand the composition is geometric, and on the other the people are wearing black-tie, on the third hand they’re about to get intimate.   Is it me or are those panties like a black hole?

Dan Attoe

Accretion 39 (Dumb Babies)

Combine the variety of Hieronymus Bosch and the weirdness of David Lynch; add a pinch of skateboarding and two d-cups of death metal and you’ve got a good recipe for taking in Dan Attoe’s newest painting, “Accretion 40.”  Placing multiple small scenes over an end-of-days landscape, he touches on everything from a drawing monkey (self-portrait?), to strippers, Christmas, and going to Hell.  Dan put the finishing touches on this yesterday, and he’s about to move and have a kid, so this is going to be the last big painting for a little while.

Rinus Van de Velde

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Rinus Van de Velde’s virtuoso charcoal drawings are eye-catching, to say the least.  I hate to use a sports metaphor, but this is the charcoal equivalent of “nothing but net.”  Van de Velde is a finalist for the Sovereign European Art Prize, and has a show opening in Nuremburg at the Instituts Für Moderne Kunst on June 19th.  All images are courtesy of Galerie Zink.

Theis Wendt

TW_Circle_(inspection)_140x180cm_2010The characters in Theis Wendt’s paintings are looking for something.  Taking place at night, his explorers throw ghostly beams from flashlights.  What are they looking for?  Houses radiate from secret sources.  Giant boats rake the coastline with spotlights.  The subject seems to be a philosophical kind of looking, and reminded me of Pink Floyd’s Ummagumm album cover.
 

Peter Cross

Steam Locomotive 1A Peter Cross makes pencil drawings to salivate over, precise and delicate, they bear witness with photographic verisimilitude to times and places that have never existed but seem weirdly deja-vu-ish.   Cross worked for over twenty years as an art handler and then as a registrar in Manhattan galleries.  Much of that time was spent with Leo Castelli, where he worked with artists like Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenburg and Roy Lichtenstein.  When I first got to NYC Peter hired me to install shows, and despite my being nosy and persistent, has always been extremely secretive about his drawings.  I finally got him to email these. Peter doesn’t have a website just yet, so if you want to contact him – leave some way to be reached in the comments section.