Ave Pildas’ Nostalgic Photographs Capture The Lively Characters Of Hollywood Boulevard During The 1970s

Teenagers Bus Bench -©1974

Bus Bench – Teenagers ©1974

Halloween - Trannies ©1974

Halloween – Trannies ©1974

People on Stars - Sundance Massage ©1973

People on Stars – Sundance Massage ©1973

Halloween - KKK ©1974

Halloween – KKK ©1974

Bus Bench - Jesus ©1974

Bus Bench – Jesus ©1974

In a series of black-and-white photographs taken between the years of 1973 and 1975, Ave Pildas provides a fascinating glimpse into how, over the span of four decades, the streets and people of Hollywood Boulevard have both changed and remained curiously the same. Pildas moved from Ohio to Los Angeles in 1971, when Capitol Records hired him to design album covers and take pictures of talent. After 6 months, Pildas left to begin his own design company called Plug In and embark on his Hollywood Boulevard project.

“This place is incredible,” Pildas said when we spoke over the phone. “People escaping the winter [and] US tourists lean towards the west — and all the nuts roll towards the west as well, stopping short of the ocean in Hollywood.” Intrigued by these people who came seeking adventure (and perhaps fame in movies and music), Pildas began to collect their portraits. “My style is to interact with people,” he said, explaining his approach. He would wait until an unknown person would walk into the light, engage with them, and then request to take their picture. Some people would pose and smile, and others would hold up their hands in rejection. “For the most part, I was treated well,” Pildas said in good humor.

Among the images you will see a whole cast of characters posing excitedly (or reluctantly) for the camera. There are apathetic teenagers at the bus stop, suave fashionistas, a chef, and, rather controversially, two people dressed up as KKK members for Halloween. In comparison to present-day street photography, which favors strong contrasts, Pildas would minimize shadows by shooting on overcast days. The result is a collection of images that are nostalgic as well as beautifully muted and almost surreal in appearance.

While some of the images look a bit dated (such as the cavalier and inappropriate attitudes of the KKK Halloween-goers), they also show how some things haven’t changed. “The costumes have changed,” Pildas observed, referring to how the fashion has inevitably shifted over the decades — but many things persist. He talked about what could still be seen: the Broadway Building, as well as the variety of restaurants, head shops, trashy lingerie stores, Scientologists, and street people hanging out. What has remained fundamentally the same is the adventurous and eclectic spirit that characterizes Hollywood Boulevard.

In an exhibition titled Hollywood Boulevard: The 70s — which opened at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE) on July 1st and runs until September 13th — Pildas has compiled an exciting collection of 51 photographs from the series. The images are made from scans of the original negatives, some of which hadn’t been seen in forty years and required repair. By opening the images to the public, Pildas offers a delightful journey into the lively history of Hollywood Boulevard and its people. Check out his website and Facebook page to learn more.

People on Stars - Chef ©1974

People on Stars – Chef ©1974

People on Stars Planet Hollywood ©1974

People on Stars – Planet Hollywood ©1974

People on Stars - See's Candies 2+1 ©1974

People on Stars – See’s Candies 2+1 ©1974

Bus Bench #1 ©1974

Bus Bench #1 ©1974

Halloween - Trick or Treat ©1974

Halloween – Trick or Treat ©1974

People on Stars - Young Crips ©1974

People on Stars – Young Crips ©1974

Halloween - Little Devil ©1974

Halloween – Little Devil ©1974

Photomat - Patch Jeans ©1974

Photomat – Patch Jeans ©1974

Photomat - White Boy ©1974

Photomat – White Boy ©1974

Photomat - Mom and 3 Boys, 1 Angry ©1974

Photomat – Mom and 3 Boys, 1 Angry ©1974

 

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