Shanti Grumbine Manipulates Imagery From The New York Times In Waves Of Textural Pixels

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

No matter what the medium, artist Shanti Grumbine manipulates her work by slicing it into fractals of distorted imagery. In her series titled Looking Awry, she uses front-page images from the New York Times, and prints them in large format. She then cuts and divides the image into hundreds of smaller pieces and rearranges them before mounting the squares onto wooden dowel. Each square resembles a pixel, creating a strange mix of visual information since they are not placed in their original spot. This hodgepodge of colors and shapes are referencing a digital file that is corrupted, in which we can no longer see what is originally intended to visually display. Although altered and skewed, we can still make out some of the original image in Grumbine’s work. If you look closely, you can see a woman’s face or remnants of a human body. Grumbine explains her journey while creating her wall reliefs.

These wall reliefs become monuments to the untold levels of mediation between my creative acts and the rest of the world.

Much like digital files move across digital highways or frequencies, Grumbine’s work seems to travel across the composition in waves. As each cut out “pixel’ is mounted on a wooden dowel, the dowels are all different lengths, creating a wall relief. These varying levels, confronting the viewer, form a new textural and visual element.  Further engaging the viewers are small, square mirrors that Grumbine integrates into each piece, replacing some of the “pixels.” Now, each captivating piece is not just reaching out at you in waves of visual complexities, but also include fractals of the viewer and its surroundings. You are now a part of the piece, a part of an endless source of aesthetic, digital information.  A master at carving new meaning into different materials, this Brooklyn-based artist also has a series of incredibly detailed newspaper cut-outs titled Zeroing, also utilizes New York Times newspapers. New visuals are sliced into each word, and even a wall relief in the shape of an orb is formed from its text.

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel

Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panel Shanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panelShanit Grumbine - basswood dowels, anodized die, pigment print, mirrors, wood panelShanti Grumbine - de-acidified New York Times, jade glue Shanti Grumbine - de-acidified New York Times, jade glue

 

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